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BenQ XL2420G G-Sync Monitor Review

Even though FreeSync is starting to appear, G-Sync is still the go-to tech for gamers seeking an image free of frame-tearing. Today we’re checking out BenQ’s latest feature-laden display – the 24-inch XL2420G.

Packaging, Physical Layout And Accessories

BenQ packs its gaming monitors in substantial lay down-style boxes with lots of protective foam to protect the contents. The top tray contains everything you need to run at 144Hz and use G-Sync. You get a USB cable, DVI and DisplayPort connectivity, a nice vinyl dust cover, a headphone hook for the upright and the S-Switch OSD controller. The upright snaps onto the panel and the base is attached with a captive bolt.

Product 360

The panel is protected by an anti-glare layer just like BenQ's other screens. Displaying test patterns and finely-detailed content shows excellent clarity without any graininess or other unwanted textures. The bezel contains touch-sensitive controls along the lower-right edge that light up when your finger comes close. They respond to light pressure with a beep and aren’t too finicky.

You can also control the OSD with the S-Switch, which plugs into its own dedicated port. The switch can be attached to either side of the base magnetically, or it can sit freely on your desk like a mouse. One quirk we hadn’t seen before – the S-Switch doesn’t work in G-Sync mode.

BenQ includes a solid stand with the XL2420G offering a full range of tilt, height, swivel and portrait adjustments. All of the movements exude quality, including ideal resistance and zero wobble. This is a high-end monitor for sure, and it demonstrates the construction to match.

The USB ports and headphone jack are on the left side panel. We’re disappointed to see only second-gen connectivity when so many other vendors enable USB 3.0. At least the headphone jack is easily accessible.

From the back you can see a racy red trim around the cable management cut-out and the headphone hook, which arrives already installed. If you don’t want to use it, snap it off. The handle on the upright’s top is metal and very solid. It easily supports the weight of the XL2420G. If you want to use your own 100mm VESA-compatible bracket, simply unsnap the upright to expose the bolt holes.

Inputs are exclusively digital, including a single DVI, two HDMI and one DisplayPort connector. G-Sync works only over DP, and you need to use that or DVI for 144Hz operation. The HDMI inputs support 60Hz-only. At the far left is the S-Switch's dedicated connection. We recommend hooking your computer up via DisplayPort and HDMI simultaneously for reasons we’ll get into on the next page.

  • bloodshotlol
    For $500+ I was expecting at least 1440p, pretty over priced tbh.
    Reply
  • Wisecracker
    I can understand why the display folks thread lightly, here. This price point is a minefield and miss-mash of tech. This monitor might be a bargain at $300.

    Otherwise, $500-$600 is Eyefinity/Surround, HD Projector, 60-inch Plasma TV territory. It's a tough sell for a display port-capable monitor these days in Adaptive/G -Sync, being that we are only moments before the flood.

    And, the market is not in the high-end, at least, not for long. It's back where us poor slubs with 'pitiful' $200 gaming cards :lol: need the help.

    Reply
  • bogda
    Finally a G-Sync monitor with more inputs than one DP. Now give me 1440p resolution and price below 500 and I will consider it.
    Reply
  • DarkSable
    Just throwing out there - saying that the brighter the monitor the better is absolutely far from the truth. If you're in an office environment under florescent lighting, then sure, but if you're interested in a gaming computer, it's probably in your room or a den, and, well... brighter is only better if you only game at night, or have every possible light on while you do.

    From all the gripes about how the monitor gets so dim, that's actually a HUGE benefit for me - nobody every bothers to test what the minimum brightness a monitor can achieve, and many monitors, especially gaming monitors, fail miserably. I'd much rather have less eye strain than picture-perfect colors when I'm gaming at night.
    Reply
  • PaulBags
    DP has better bandwidth, so why does the HDMI here have better contrast and colour accuraccy?
    Reply
  • Shankovich
    Here's that $200 nVidia premium kicking in. Could have made it IPS or 1440p guys come on...
    Reply
  • blakphoenix
    I'm sorry but there is no way this monitor could be classed as having "professional-level color accuracy". For starters it doesn't even get 100% sRGB, let alone the terrible sub 70% AdobeRGB performance. Is it good enough for games? It may well be. Is it professional level colour? Not even close!
    Reply
  • bystander
    Just throwing out there - saying that the brighter the monitor the better is absolutely far from the truth. If you're in an office environment under florescent lighting, then sure, but if you're interested in a gaming computer, it's probably in your room or a den, and, well... brighter is only better if you only game at night, or have every possible light on while you do.

    From all the gripes about how the monitor gets so dim, that's actually a HUGE benefit for me - nobody every bothers to test what the minimum brightness a monitor can achieve, and many monitors, especially gaming monitors, fail miserably. I'd much rather have less eye strain than picture-perfect colors when I'm gaming at night.
    Brightness does have one important use; ULMB. In ULMB, because the backlighting pulses, it causes these monitors to be very dim. Extra brightness helps to counteract this issue, but I do agree, testing the minimum might be useful, as there are some people out there that have to play at nearly the lowest levels due to headaches.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    Wow very sweet for a monitor. I would highly consider this monitor if I can afford it. Since I use my computer for both work and play.

    However, for that price I'm disappointed it's only 1080P. I hope they come out with a free sync 1440P version that's cheaper than this monitor.
    Reply
  • Bezzell
    1080p, TN, $550? No thanks.
    Reply