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Seasonic Connect 750W Power Supply Review: The Solution To Cable Management Problems

Seasonic Connect is the first PSU with a backplane.

Seasonic CONNECT Comprise PRIME
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Seasonic)

Protection Features

Check out our PSUs 101 article to learn more about PSU protection features.

Protection Features

 

OCP

12V: 87.8A (141.61%), 12.027V
5V: 27.9A (139.5%), 4.972V
3.3V: 27.6A (138%), 3.252V
5VSB: 6.1A (203.33%
), 4.958V

OPP

1069.34W (141.63%)

OTP PSU / Connect Module

✓ (132°C @ 12V Heat Sink)
✓ (155°C @ VRMs Heat Sink)

SCP

12V: ✓
5V: ✓
3.3V: ✓
5VSB: ✓
-12V: ✓

PWR_OK

Proper Operation

NLO

SIP

Surge: MOV
Inrush: NTC Thermistor & Bypass Relay

The OCP and OPP triggering points are set quite high. This might be a capable platform, but we would prefer to see within 130% thresholds. On the other hand, the over-temperature protection is configured correctly in both the power supply and the Connect module. 

DC Power Sequencing

According to Intel’s most recent Power Supply Design Guide (revision 1.4), the +12V and 5V outputs must be equal to or greater than the 3.3V rail at all times. Unfortunately, Intel doesn't mention why it is so important to always keep the 3.3V rail's voltage lower than the levels of the other two outputs.

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(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

DC Power Sequencing Scope Shots

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The 3.3V rail is always lower than the other two, so there is no problem here.

Cross Load Tests

To generate the following charts, we set our loaders to auto mode through custom-made software before trying more than 25,000 possible load combinations with the +12V, 5V, and 3.3V rails. The deviations in each of the charts below are calculated by taking the nominal values of the rails (12V, 5V, and 3.3V) as point zero. The ambient temperature during testing was between 30 to 32 degrees Celsius (86 to 89.6 degrees Fahrenheit).

Load Regulation Charts

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(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Load Regulation Charts

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Efficiency Chart

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Ripple Charts

The lower the power supply's ripple, the more stable the system will be and less stress will also be applied to its components.

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(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

Ripple Suppression Charts

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Infrared Images

We apply a half-load for 10 minutes with the PSU's top cover and cooling fan removed before taking photos with a modified FLIR E4 camera able to deliver an IR resolution of 320x240 (76,800 pixels).

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(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

IR Images

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The temperatures are kept at normal levels.

We wanted to see how the Connect module copes with the heat that the DC-DC converters generate, under very high loads, so we applied 100W combined on the minor rails for 30 minutes, and we took several IR images.

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(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

IR Images - Connect Module

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We pushed the VRMs of the Connect module hard. Still, the temperatures at its internals were kept at low levels, proving that you won't have any overheating issues in any real-life usage scenarios. 

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  • Phaaze88
    I was curious about this one. Not bad, but there's room for improvement.
    Reply
  • Math Geek
    i missed this one some how before it was released. but i like the idea and do hope we get more and more of these. is a solution to something i never even thought of as a problem, but now can't imagine doing without!!
    Reply
  • Myrmidonas
    An idea better than RGB in my opinion. Implementation can be improved though.
    Reply
  • bit_user
    Thanks for the thorough and comprehensive review, Aris!

    I don't have a problem with their existing modular setup. I have 3 Seasonic modular PSUs (and one semi-modular) and have swapped two of them between machines, on a couple occasions. It was very nice to be able to swap PSUs without having to unplug, reroute, and reconnect the cables from everything - just disconnect them at the PSU end. I also like being able to borrow cables that came with one PSU to use with another.

    With that said, I would use this style of setup under two conditions:
    Actual PSU performance should equal or exceed their conventional models.
    Cable compatibility should be retained with their existing modular PSUs.
    Otherwise, I'll just stick with what's been working just fine for me, as long as they continue to be available.
    Reply