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Sharp Beginning Production on Three New IGZO Displays

Sharp has begun production of high-pixel density IGZO LCD panels for notebook computers that will offer some of the industry’s highest pixel densities and will be available in 11.6-, 14- and 15.6-inch models with compatibility for "stylus input" touchscreens.

The IGZO panel technology utilizes smaller, thin-film transistors and increased light transmittance which offers two important benefits. First of all, the higher pixel density allows the display of high quality images and crisply rendered fine text. Second, the technology allows greater energy efficiency by reducing the amount of power required to drive liquid crystals during the display of still images.

Size11.6 inches13.3 inches14 inches15.6 inches
Resolution2560 x 1440 (WQHD)3200 x 1800(WQHD+)3200 x 1800(WQHD+)2560 x 1440(WQHD)
Pixel Density253 ppi262 ppi235 ppi221 ppi

Production is scheduled to commence in June 2013 at Sharp's Kameyama Plant No. 2 along with the company’s 13.3 inch IGZO panels that are currently in production.

  • house70
    The floodgates are open.
    Reply
  • iggyman
    IZGO? You probably mean IGZO. 2560x012440? You probably mean 2560x1440, right?
    Reply
  • segio526
    Odd that the resolution dropped when it got to 15.6". Given how the industry is going, I wouldn't be surprised if they also announced a 24" with 1920x1080 resolution!
    Reply
  • ubercake
    Why can't they get us 3200x1800 with 120Hz refresh, little to no input lag and 1 or 2 ms response times on a 35" desktop monitor? That's what I want.
    Reply
  • vmem
    guys, size is actually the main limitation. it's very difficult to make a 4K panel 24-30 inch in size at high yield. there is currently an extremely high rate of failure, which will drop as the technology matures.
    Reply
  • ubercake
    10822796 said:
    guys, size is actually the main limitation. it's very difficult to make a 4K panel 24-30 inch in size at high yield. there is currently an extremely high rate of failure, which will drop as the technology matures.

    Oh. That makes sense. But I think it's kind of funny how they continue to cram tinier pixels and more pixels into smaller screens. My eyes have their limitations, you know?
    Reply
  • lamorpa
    Your dpi numbers are all wrong. The correct figures are:
    11.6" 316dpi
    13.3" 276dpi
    14.0" 262dpi
    15.6" 235dpi
    Reply
  • IndignantSkeptic
    WTF?! still no OLED?!
    Reply
  • warezme
    about time.
    Reply
  • warezme
    about time.
    Reply