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Uh Oh, Comcast CEO Says TWC Merger 'Full Steam Ahead'

Hardly a day goes by when we don't hear something about the conundrum with ISPs in the U.S., and today is no exception. We've spent a long time waiting, but Comcast CEO Brian Roberts gave an update on what will happen with the TWC/Comcast merger by saying that it's going "full steam ahead."

The merger was proposed back in February, and it will take place as a stock swap, with Comcast buying all of TWC's shares for $45 billion. The merger would result in the biggest broadband cable provider in the U.S., which many feel should not happen. Many believe it would give Comcast too much power over the ISP space, with some going as far as suggesting that the merger is monopolistic behavior.

Comcast's defense against the monopolistic behavior argument is that Comcast and TWC do not operate in the same areas anyway, with only a very small coverage overlap area.

Many related companies have also expressed clear disapproval of the merger, including Netflix, which flat out asked the FCC not to permit the deal. This is because the ISPs have been asking content providers such as Netflix to pay additional fees in order to give their traffic the same priority as other web traffic over their networks, which goes against the net neutrality stance. Perhaps if Obama's statement on net neutrality gets implemented, the merger won't bother content providers like Netflix as much, although that doesn't make it ideal.

The merger between Comcast and TWC and the fight for an open Internet are two separate issues, although if both sway the wrong way the U.S. broadband industry will certainly have leaped to the dark side.

We're still waiting for the FCC to announce whether it is approving or blocking the merger. The review is expected to be completed in early 2015. Considering that we don't know the outcome of this yet, we're curious how Roberts can be confident enough to say that the merger is going to happen.

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  • blaint
    If the FCC permits the merger, I'm cancelling TWC immediately. Too many horror stories about Comcast customer service. Going to encourage all my friends and family to do the same.

    Unfortunately I think my only other option is ATT, but it's the principle of the matter. I encourage all of you out there to do the same, hit em in the wallet.
    Reply
  • coolitic
    Merger is a bad idea.

    ISP is already anti-competitive enough, so please don't make it worse by allowing this monopoly.
    Reply
  • Altheran
    "Comcast's defense against the monopolistic behavior argument is that Comcast and TWC do not operate in the same areas anyway, with only a very small coverage overlap area."

    I kinda agree with that :/ How is it an issue if they don't really compete against one another anyways ...

    Is it not better to have 3-4 Big Pan-American Telcos Competing each other everywhere rather than 20 that never get on each others lawn ???

    Try menacing to go to a competitors for bad service/price when at your address, there is no other option :/ Wut ? U gonna move ? lol
    Reply
  • thor220
    14580631 said:
    "Comcast's defense against the monopolistic behavior argument is that Comcast and TWC do not operate in the same areas anyway, with only a very small coverage overlap area."

    I kinda agree with that :/ How is it an issue if they don't really compete against one another anyways ...

    Is it not better to have 3-4 Big Pan-American Telcos Competing each other everywhere rather than 20 that never get on each others lawn ???

    Try menacing to go to a competitors for bad service/price when at your address, there is no other option :/ Wut ? U gonna move ? lol

    There are two problems with your idea. First is that Comcast and Time Warner do not compete as it is now. If they currently aren't competing, it only makes it worse when they combine. The second is vertical leverage. If the merger goes though they will pretty much be able to dictate the pricing for services over the internet. Seeing as both companies have media investments, you can imagine that they will charge competitors an arm and a leg. In addition to that, what's the point of increasing internet speed for Comcast? They can block any small startups and they are the only cable provider in town. They could charge $100 for 10Mbps if they wanted.

    They say that this merger won't reduce competition but that's only because there's none in most areas to begin with. I only have one choice for high speed in my area. Doubling the worst company in america's size have bad written all over it.
    Reply
  • somebodyspecial
    This better get blocked. We need more competition not less and not competing on the same turf is exactly the problem here. THEY SHOULD BE! This does nothing but hurt customers even more than already with these two controlling as much as they do now alone.
    Reply
  • eklipz330
    im gonna convince my sister to get fios so fast
    Reply
  • turkey3_scratch
    Monopoly? No. Oligopoly? Yes.
    Reply
  • Eli_M
    I say, give hem everything they ever wanted, all at once. Everything in a single day with a small timeline to go ahead and fully take advantages of all the new gains.

    Then sit back and watch the beast first vomit and then stagger off and die form a ruptured stomach.

    They cant help themselves, give them everything and its absolutely inevitable they will start trying to pull the biggest fleecing imaginable and then THAT will be impossible to ignore, even for a company shill installed to regulate them.
    Reply
  • MessengerofDeath
    The big stock holders of TWC need to step up and step in to shake the company up. Fire the CEO and everyone who's leading it now. Then hire new people that will hopefully make the company more competitive and profitable for the future.
    Reply
  • nbelote
    Windstream has a monopoly where I live; they bribe their way into keeping other providers out. Their service is terrible and their technicians do nothing about it. If even Comcast, with their terrible customer service, were to come down my street, they'd be welcomed with open arms.
    Reply