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Desktop Vendors Not Keen on Using Chrome OS

By - Source: DigiTimes | B 32 comments

Unnamed vendors have said that Google needs to provide more resources and support if it's serious about Chrome OS on desktops.

DigiTimes reports that desktop PC vendors seemingly turned their nose up at Google's Chrome OS during executive chairman Eric Schmidt's speech in Taiwan on Wednesday. He was reportedly promoting Chrome OS as a high-profile option to Windows 7 and Ubuntu, focusing on the software's fast boot time, a lack of virus issues and the fact that it will be offered free of charge. He urged vendors to give Chrome OS a try.

But unnamed vendors on Wednesday said that if Google really wants to cut into the PC sector, then it will need to provide more resources and support than it has with the current crop of Chromebooks. As it stands now, there has been very little demand for Chromebooks since Acer and Samsung launched their versions back in June. The former company reportedly only sold 5,000 units by the end of July, and the latter Samsung was said to have sold even less than that in the same timeframe.

According to the unnamed vendors, the problem Chrome OS faces is that it's still too idealized. Consumers and businesses have yet to fully embrace cloud computing, storing documents and media locally on their physical drives. Popular applications are just now shifting over into the cloud by way of HTML5, but most highly-used and long-standing applications like Microsoft Office and Adobe Creative Suite are still installed locally and used offline.

The vendors also indicated that Google is mainly pushing Chromebooks in the enterprise market, yet its cloud-based Google Docs applications doesn't meet the needs of enterprise users. On a consumer front, Chromebooks become problematic for users who have a poor connection to the internet, or don't have a connection at all -- the "lite" cloud-based advantage suddenly becomes a huge disadvantage.

That said, it's no surprise that vendors aren't too keen on using Chrome OS as a major desktop platform. While many services and applications are indeed moving up into the cloud, the majority of the enterprise and consumer base hasn't quite shifted away from physical media even though cloud computing is the "trend of the future."

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Top Comments
  • 19 Hide
    chumly , November 10, 2011 8:43 PM
    Seriously, I don't want cloud. What's mine is mine.
  • 12 Hide
    phatboe , November 10, 2011 8:42 PM
    Before Google pushes out Chrome OS they need to lobby to the wireless/Big Telephone companies to lower their their 3G/4G bandwidth prices. Right now Verizon is charging $30 for a measly 2GB/month connection even over LTE. I would assume that since a cloud based OS such as Chrome OS would likely eat through those limits very quickly.

    I am not necessarily suggesting going back to unlimited data bandwidth (although that would be nice) but 2GB a month for $30 is way over priced.
  • 10 Hide
    phatboe , November 10, 2011 8:48 PM
    otacon72"lack of virus issues"...um because Chrome OS doesn't run anything of importance and it has maybe .01% market share. If Linux can't muster more than .1% share who on earth thinks Chrome OS will ever be mainstream.


    Yeah, lets forget about 90% of the worlds supercomputers and the millions of websites and servers which run Linux. Lets also forget about Android which is based on Linux and is the most used consumer mobile OS ahead of both WinMo7 and iOS combined. Yeah Linux will never be mainstream.
Other Comments
    Display all 32 comments.
  • 7 Hide
    Anonymous , November 10, 2011 8:35 PM
    desktop's not so much, it might be a good choice for net tops or lightweight all in one computers.
  • 12 Hide
    phatboe , November 10, 2011 8:42 PM
    Before Google pushes out Chrome OS they need to lobby to the wireless/Big Telephone companies to lower their their 3G/4G bandwidth prices. Right now Verizon is charging $30 for a measly 2GB/month connection even over LTE. I would assume that since a cloud based OS such as Chrome OS would likely eat through those limits very quickly.

    I am not necessarily suggesting going back to unlimited data bandwidth (although that would be nice) but 2GB a month for $30 is way over priced.
  • 19 Hide
    chumly , November 10, 2011 8:43 PM
    Seriously, I don't want cloud. What's mine is mine.
  • 10 Hide
    phatboe , November 10, 2011 8:48 PM
    otacon72"lack of virus issues"...um because Chrome OS doesn't run anything of importance and it has maybe .01% market share. If Linux can't muster more than .1% share who on earth thinks Chrome OS will ever be mainstream.


    Yeah, lets forget about 90% of the worlds supercomputers and the millions of websites and servers which run Linux. Lets also forget about Android which is based on Linux and is the most used consumer mobile OS ahead of both WinMo7 and iOS combined. Yeah Linux will never be mainstream.
  • 9 Hide
    ozzy702 , November 10, 2011 8:56 PM
    phatboeYeah, lets forget about 90% of the worlds supercomputers and the millions of websites and servers which run Linux. Lets also forget about Android which is based on Linux and is the most used consumer mobile OS ahead of both WinMo7 and iOS combined. Yeah Linux will never be mainstream.


    Agreed, linux wonderful for what it is and is everywhere... EXCEPT the desktop PC market. A huge hurtle is DirectX. Microsoft did a wonderful job of locking down the gaming market with dirextX, they're good at business.
  • 8 Hide
    fulle , November 10, 2011 9:29 PM
    So, you make a lighweight Linux distribution, and then give it the gimmick that most of it's applications are stored up on the cloud. Everyone hates it. Casual users hate it, power users hate it, home users, enterprise uses. It's like universally hated... it's hated so much, that it's actually impressive how much it's hated. A couple desktop venders try it out for giggles, and they sell hardly any units because the idea just sucks.

    What do?
  • 5 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , November 10, 2011 9:49 PM
    For now, the cloud is a waste of time, particularly with phone companies charging so damn much for data. If it's going to work AT ALL, we NEED AFFORDABLE unlimited plans.
  • 1 Hide
    andy_newton , November 10, 2011 9:53 PM
    Reminds me of an old familiar OS. I just forgot what it is. Let me think for a while... Oh yeah!!!

    Mac OS X

    Sure looks like Mac OS X.
  • 8 Hide
    drwho1 , November 10, 2011 10:02 PM
    chumlySeriously, I don't want cloud. What's mine is mine.


    This is indeed the bottom line.

    I will never switch from saving/accessing my programs or files to some cloud who knows where.
    I prefer to have them on my own hard drive.

    Need a copy of X or Y?
    That's what backups are for.
  • 0 Hide
    burnley14 , November 10, 2011 10:14 PM
    I tried using their Chromium OS a while back but it was over my head, I couldn't even figure out how to install it. Hopefully this Chrome OS is a little more friendly to the tech enthusiast, and not just the tech professional. If so, I'd totally give it a try on an old laptop. May breathe some new life into it, who knows?
  • -1 Hide
    alidan , November 10, 2011 10:17 PM
    otacon72"lack of virus issues"...um because Chrome OS doesn't run anything of importance and it has maybe .01% market share. If Linux can't muster more than .1% share who on earth thinks Chrome OS will ever be mainstream.


    i do...

    most people use a computer for internet access, watching a youtube video, and maybe writing a document.

    taking out windows would reduce pc cost by what 100$

    so long as chrome os is a fully featured chrome browser, as in everything it can do in windows it can do in chrome, the vast majority of people can switch to it tomorrow and barely notice a difference.

    if chrome os took it a step further and incorporated opengl, and google payed to make opengl versions of top games, chrome os may take off faster than a windows because im assuming chrome os is VERY light weight compared to a windows, and opengl wont force a 150-300$ upgrade to your pc ever (aside from graphics cards, but not an os)
  • 5 Hide
    ta152h , November 10, 2011 10:19 PM
    Cloud computing is someone telling you they want control over what you do, and telling you it's a good thing for you. Something about it makes me more than a little uncomfortable, not the least of which is why they want that control in the first place.
  • 2 Hide
    amk-aka-Phantom , November 10, 2011 10:26 PM
    Squash that BS, Microsoft! Death to the cloud!
  • 0 Hide
    sykozis , November 10, 2011 10:31 PM
    alidani do... most people use a computer for internet access, watching a youtube video, and maybe writing a document. taking out windows would reduce pc cost by what 100$so long as chrome os is a fully featured chrome browser, as in everything it can do in windows it can do in chrome, the vast majority of people can switch to it tomorrow and barely notice a difference. if chrome os took it a step further and incorporated opengl, and google payed to make opengl versions of top games, chrome os may take off faster than a windows because im assuming chrome os is VERY light weight compared to a windows, and opengl wont force a 150-300$ upgrade to your pc ever (aside from graphics cards, but not an os)


    Yes, ChromeOS could reduce the initial pc cost....but it far exceeds that initial cost in extra services that are required to make it usable. ChromeOS requires an internet connection.

    Since Linux supports OpenGL and ChromeOS is linux based, it would be stupid for Google to remove OpenGL support.
  • 0 Hide
    tlmck , November 10, 2011 10:56 PM
    Looks a lot like gOS.
  • 0 Hide
    julianbautista87 , November 10, 2011 11:07 PM
    Google is everywhere nowadays.
  • 0 Hide
    alidan , November 10, 2011 11:16 PM
    sykozisYes, ChromeOS could reduce the initial pc cost....but it far exceeds that initial cost in extra services that are required to make it usable. ChromeOS requires an internet connection.Since Linux supports OpenGL and ChromeOS is linux based, it would be stupid for Google to remove OpenGL support.


    i thought chrome os was the chrome browser but turned into an os...

    you also have to read what i posted, most people are getting a computer for net use. they already have a net connection.

    also i thought chrome os worked offline, it just doesnt sync till online.
  • 2 Hide
    Benihana , November 10, 2011 11:22 PM
    I think most people in IT have abused their power every now and then. Not to do anything really, but just for curiosities sake.

    So no thanks Cloud. I'd rather entrust my data to a 10 year old HDD at the brink of failure than any reliable cloud system. No data is pretty bad. But data in the wrong hands is far worse. And the wrong hands are all hands not my own.
  • 0 Hide
    soundping , November 10, 2011 11:50 PM
    If Google can make COS easy so non-tech people can install it then it will take off.
  • 0 Hide
    sayakbiswas , November 11, 2011 12:18 AM
    internet is'nt cheap enough for cloud.......and i dont see COS winning where proper distributions like Ubuntu,Fedora have failed.
    One must remember two things, a free OS will not generate extra revenue for the vendor(in comparison to Windows)......and Microsoft Office has a monopoly in office enviroments, with few alternatives for sharepoint/onenote etc.
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