Scythe's New Mine 2 HSF Has Eight Heatpipes

Monday Scythe announced the impressive Mine 2, a CPU cooler using a twin-cooler layout, eight copper heatpipes, and enough fins (via two cooling blocks) to resemble a miniature skyscraper towering over the surrounding motherboard components.

Available worldwide sometime in February, the Mine 2 will feature a 140-mm Slip Stream PWM & VR fan residing between the two towers, pulling air into one side of the layout and blowing the heat pulled up by the heatpipes out the other side. Scythe designed the lower part of the installed fan to cool the devices around the CPU socket, such as voltage regulators and RAM. The overall cooler design can also accommodate up to two additional fans by using fan clips which are sold separately.

"Although the fan supports the PWM feature, the user can manually adjust the PWM bandwidth between 470 to 1,370 rpm and 740 to 1,900 rpm," the company said. "Despite the changed bandwidth, the fan is still controlled by the PWM signal from the motherboard, allowing an individual but also dynamic fan control. Alternatively it is possible to disable the PWM function. Instead the fan can be controlled manually in a range of 500 to 1,700 rpm. This gives every user the option to optimize the Mine 2 CPU cooler for performance or low noise according to own preferences."

Scythe said that the CPU cooler uses the new Flip Mount Super Backplate 3 (F.M.S.B.3) mounting system "for safe and stable attachment." For Intel-based motherboards, the Mine 2 is compatible with Socket T / LGA775, Socket LGA1155, Socket LGA1156 and. Socket LGA1366. For AMD-based boards, the CPU cooler is compatible with Socket AM2, Socket AM2+ and Socket AM3. The overall device dimensions are 5.51 x 5.51 x 0.98-in (140 x 140 x 25-mm), and weighs 40.57-oz (1,150-g).

The Scythe Mine 2 will be available soon for around $68 USD (50.50 Euro). For a detailed list of specs, check out the product page here.

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  • plznote
    Weighs more than a kilogram!
    2
  • eklipz330
    i think this design of HSF is going to be seen more and more often... if the top of the CPU has evenly distributed heat, than this design seems good, but if two heat pipes are trying to offset heat more than the other heatpipes, those heatsinks should be larger

    anyone get what i'm trying to say?
    3
  • Marco925
    It looks like a block of high rise flats in the soviet union.
    7