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Indie Android Console OUYA Has Over 481 Confirmed Games

By - Source: Engadget | B 22 comments

OUYA has over 481 confirmed games.

If there's one thing clear about the next console generation, it's that the Big Three may not be enjoying their position on high for much longer. Kickstarter darling OUYA and Valve's Steam Box both focus on a console experience that is no longer quite as locked down as it once was. With Valve's position as a digital service provider sealed with Steam, the company's in a great position to launch a console and provide it ample software support. Despite OUYA's sterling array of personnel, it's a new and untested company. Though its Kickstarter was a roaring success, the crowdfunding site is no guarantee for success. Good software support is a key factor in swaying customers onto a console, something that's rather up in the air for a new console developer. Plenty of indie console developers in the past have done the same song and dance, only to have their projects fail miserably because they fail to woo software developers.

With OUYA's impending release, software support will be key. The Android-based console's already landed Robert Bowling and Robotoki's post-apocalyptic Human Element, but one triple-A developed title is hardly going to be the swaying factor. An OUYA forum member compiled a list of confirmed games for the console, and the list clocks in at 481 titles. Most are unknown games, but there are a few gems such as AirMech, Double Fine Adventure, and Final Fantasy III. Hawken, Fatal Theory, Canabalt, among other titles, are still rumored for an OUYA release. Still, getting 481 titles onto a console for launch is no small feat, and the list will only grow as OUYA's release date gets closer. 


 

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  • 14 Hide
    Junoh315 , February 25, 2013 2:27 PM
    merikafyeahA console being released with tons of games ready for it? All console releases should be like this.


    This seems to be an okay system but a lot of their games will be classic games brought back. One game that was announced was Final fantasy 3. That game is older than I am but it looks like they're using the DS version.
  • 10 Hide
    merikafyeah , February 25, 2013 2:05 PM
    A console being released with tons of games ready for it? All console releases should be like this.
Other Comments
  • 10 Hide
    merikafyeah , February 25, 2013 2:05 PM
    A console being released with tons of games ready for it? All console releases should be like this.
  • 1 Hide
    Elwenil , February 25, 2013 2:11 PM
    481 games and probably 450 of them are all casual shovelware crap. Why buy a console that only plays games you can play on your phone or tablet?
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , February 25, 2013 2:16 PM
    @Elwenil

    You go ahead and play Hawken on your phone then.
  • 14 Hide
    Junoh315 , February 25, 2013 2:27 PM
    merikafyeahA console being released with tons of games ready for it? All console releases should be like this.


    This seems to be an okay system but a lot of their games will be classic games brought back. One game that was announced was Final fantasy 3. That game is older than I am but it looks like they're using the DS version.
  • -6 Hide
    brickman , February 25, 2013 2:32 PM
    500 games then you got a deal :p 
  • 9 Hide
    back_by_demand , February 25, 2013 2:44 PM
    merikafyeahA console being released with tons of games ready for it? All console releases should be like this.

    To be fair, Final Fantasy 3 is hardly a new game
  • 8 Hide
    therabiddeer , February 25, 2013 3:04 PM
    Number of games does not mean it is good.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Action_52
    52 games on 1 cartridge for nintendo?! It couldnt be bad! But it was horrible....
  • 4 Hide
    friskiest , February 25, 2013 3:10 PM
    I think that many people that would get the Ouya on release simply based on the support it got from Kickstarter and open-source developers, but this uses mobile phone hardware minus the screen and battery- it'll suffer the same as real game consoles in that they're already outdated at release; not even considering how fast the development is in mobile technology.

    Save for people who would use this to play homebrew games or those who simply want to play "retro" games rather than the latest mobile titles; better buy a phone with decent/better specs and use it as its supposed to be than shell out $100 every year for this.

    And please don't even consider this as a another threat (aside from the mobile gaming industry as a whole) to serious game consoles (PS, Xbox) heck, even against the Wii.

  • 4 Hide
    esrever , February 25, 2013 3:14 PM
    if you buy a PC, it will have millions of games released and more coming. This is more of a very very limited PC than a console.
  • 3 Hide
    joecole1572 , February 25, 2013 3:31 PM
    I impulse backed the project...and I may be starting to regret it. I have been on the ouya subreddit since it was announced and as most people pointed out, 90% of those games are shovelware. I'm all for the indie game scene, but most developers are trying to get away with really lame looking games. I was excited for FFIII and some of the other high quality mobile game studios throwing their support behind the system, but ever since the funding ended, not one well known major or indie studio has given their support.

    If I can find 10 or so games that I actually want to purchase by the end of its lifetime, I'll consider an acceptable purchase. I am starting to fear that this may never happen....

    P.S. I am really sick of people saying that the Big Three should look out for this. This machine seems like it will get a cult following at best. I don't think the general consumer wants to play slightly better resolution smartphone games on their TV (only I would want to do that :p ).
  • 2 Hide
    loops , February 25, 2013 3:34 PM
    For the price, I can see this thing doing well against a Wii. I'd get one for the kids if they were old enough.

    It must be able to do hulu and nexflix tho. IT must.
  • 3 Hide
    zyberwoof , February 25, 2013 3:49 PM
    It's funny to hear all of the bashing on here. This is a very hacker-friendly device. What's to stop you from putting a custom ROM like Cyanogenmod on it? Nothing. In fact, I think that it is encouraged to mod the heck out of it.

    AppleTV's sell for $100 also, and they don't play games or come with a controller. Also, how may $100, small form factor, low power PC's out there can you find that play games that are being actively developed today?

    Shelling out $100 a year for the new version of this isn't necessary. Just like it isn't necessary to get a new phone or PC each year. However, at $100 a pop, it wouldn't be that bad either. When you buy your new one for you family room, move the older one to your bedroom TV for web browsing, video streaming, or light gaming. Heck, you could probably also make an older one it into a decent NAS with a USB hard drive.

    The Ouya isn't a competitor to PC, Xbox, and Play Station games in the sense that you will get much better performance from the big boys. But, just like the Wii was a competitor to everyone else and spread marketshare, the Ouya or something like it could take the market by storm.

    When Minecraft exploded in popularity, it was ugly and buggy. However, it was cheap, open, different, and fun. Ouya is the first 3. If it can get the "fun" part down, the doors will swing open for Android consoles.
  • 3 Hide
    Cazalan , February 25, 2013 3:57 PM
    Low quality games/graphics is really only tolerable for portable gaming systems and phones.
  • 1 Hide
    jhansonxi , February 25, 2013 5:41 PM
    Some of the games on that list were Kickstarter campaigns and haven't been released yet (like Forced by Betadwarf).
  • -1 Hide
    Immoral Medic , February 25, 2013 6:31 PM
    None of which, I will play.
  • -1 Hide
    bustapr , February 25, 2013 11:17 PM
    Elwenil481 games and probably 450 of them are all casual shovelware crap. Why buy a console that only plays games you can play on your phone or tablet?

    because the console does not play games meant for your phone. the android OS is just that, an OS. the games on it are meant to be played on a controller. it just so happens that alot of the games on it were originally on phones first. but the games on it are modified to be played with controller. this is meant for the indie developer and the emulator gamer.
  • 0 Hide
    dalethepcman , February 26, 2013 12:06 AM
    Elwenil481 games and probably 450 of them are all casual shovelware crap. Why buy a console that only plays games you can play on your phone or tablet?

    You obviously never saw sales figures for the Wii....
    benberstler48 my co-worker's sister-in-law makes $75 an hour on the internet.

    I am your father's brother's nephew's cousin's former roommate, and I make $75 an hour on the internet too!! (bonus cookies if anyone knows where that's from)
  • 0 Hide
    IndignantSkeptic , February 26, 2013 12:12 AM
    Android games on mobiles should already be designed to play with a joypad since ages ago. It's a shame that the OUYA has to exist and fail solely for the purpose of forcing Android game developers to stop being idiots and make all their games joypad compatible.
  • 0 Hide
    Onihikage , February 26, 2013 12:25 AM
    friskiestI think that many people that would get the Ouya on release simply based on the support it got from Kickstarter and open-source developers, but this uses mobile phone hardware minus the screen and battery- it'll suffer the same as real game consoles in that they're already outdated at release; not even considering how fast the development is in mobile technology.Save for people who would use this to play homebrew games or those who simply want to play "retro" games rather than the latest mobile titles; better buy a phone with decent/better specs and use it as its supposed to be than shell out $100 every year for this.And please don't even consider this as a another threat (aside from the mobile gaming industry as a whole) to serious game consoles (PS, Xbox) heck, even against the Wii.

    1) With a higher capacity for cooling and no battery to cater to, they can clock its hardware much higher than an equivalent phone.

    2a) In terms of power, EVERYTHING is "outdated" mere weeks after it comes out. Unless you are constantly upgrading and always have the best hardware (which 99% of PC gamers definitely don't do), you will always be gaming on so-called "outdated" hardware, and PC developers primarily code with that 99% in mind. Getting the best of the best is usually just a tactic to allow one to delay upgrading as long as possible.

    2b) Being "outdated" is irrelevant when we're talking about a console that's meant to be low-power from the start. Sure, a game should have a pleasant and consistent visual aesthetic, but what the lasting popularity of many older and indie games has shown is that solid gameplay is far more important than having amazing graphics.

    3) This console is far more hackable than any that has come before it. People will find incredible uses for this outside of gaming, you can count on that.

    4) You could shell out $500 for a new unlocked iPhone or Galaxy every year, because those are the latest and greatest in the series, but do you? I doubt it - you probably wait 2 or 3 years because that's how long it takes for new versions to become significantly more powerful than your current model; also, new versions are typically marketed towards either new entrants to the ecosystem or as upgrades from significantly older models. All of this will apply to Ouya consumers, but one thing that the Ouya has over phones is that buying a new Ouya doesn't render your old one useless; you can pass it on to a family member or friend who doesn't have one at all, or use some open-source application to turn it into something that isn't for gaming - perhaps a NAS as one user suggested.
  • 0 Hide
    teh_chem , February 26, 2013 3:18 AM
    Onihikage1) With a higher capacity for cooling and no battery to cater to, they can clock its hardware much higher than an equivalent phone.2a) In terms of power, EVERYTHING is "outdated" mere weeks after it comes out. Unless you are constantly upgrading and always have the best hardware (which 99% of PC gamers definitely don't do), you will always be gaming on so-called "outdated" hardware, and PC developers primarily code with that 99% in mind. Getting the best of the best is usually just a tactic to allow one to delay upgrading as long as possible.2b) Being "outdated" is irrelevant when we're talking about a console that's meant to be low-power from the start. Sure, a game should have a pleasant and consistent visual aesthetic, but what the lasting popularity of many older and indie games has shown is that solid gameplay is far more important than having amazing graphics.3) This console is far more hackable than any that has come before it. People will find incredible uses for this outside of gaming, you can count on that.4) You could shell out $500 for a new unlocked iPhone or Galaxy every year, because those are the latest and greatest in the series, but do you? I doubt it - you probably wait 2 or 3 years because that's how long it takes for new versions to become significantly more powerful than your current model; also, new versions are typically marketed towards either new entrants to the ecosystem or as upgrades from significantly older models. All of this will apply to Ouya consumers, but one thing that the Ouya has over phones is that buying a new Ouya doesn't render your old one useless; you can pass it on to a family member or friend who doesn't have one at all, or use some open-source application to turn it into something that isn't for gaming - perhaps a NAS as one user suggested.

    Re. 1)--Everyone who counters the argument of "mobile phone platform" uses this response, but I have yet to see any indication of how much faster the Tegra 3 in the OUYA is vs. any other comparable platform. Sure, you don't have the framebuffer effects of tegra 3 in a screened platform, but at the same time, how much as T3 been clocked up in OUYA vs. most other T3 devices? I'm not saying that you can't clock up a platform more when you don't have to consider batteries or thermal impacts of small form-factor enclosures, but I would also like to say "show me." And also, how much performance does one net with clock increases with T3?
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