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Rumor: Intel Discontinuing Over 25 Desktop CPUs

By - Source: DigiTimes | B 41 comments

Intel is reportedly making room for the flood of new Ivy Bridge CPUs slated to arrive in April.

Unnamed industry sources in Taiwan claim that Intel has updated hardware partners with a new schedule that sees the halt of over 25 existing desktop CPU models. The cease in production will reportedly start in 1Q12 in order to make room for the new 22-nm Ivy Bridge processors slated to launch sometime around April 8, 2012.

According to the sources, Intel has issued a notice to cease production of the following CPUs:

1Q12
 - Core i7-875K/860S
 - Core i5-760/750S/655K
 - Celeron 450/430

2Q12
 - Celeron E3500
 - Celeron E3300
 - Core i7-960/950/930/870
 - Core i7-880S/870S
 - Core i5-661/660
 - Core i5-2300/680/670
 - Core i3-530
 - Core Duo E7500/E7600
 - Pentium G960
 - Pentium E6600/E550
 - Pentium E5700

As previously reported, Intel is slated to launch Ivy Bridge on April 8. On the whole, Intel is expected to release a total of 25 models including 17 CPUs for the desktop and 8 for notebooks and ultrabooks. The first desktop flood will include the Core i7-3770K, 3770, 3770S, 3770T CPUs, the Core i5-3570, 3550 and 3450 CPUs, and the Z77, H77, Z75 and B75 chipsets. Then in May, Intel will unleash the Core i5-3470T CPU along with the Q77 and Q75 desktop chipsets.

As for notebooks, Intel will reportedly release the Core i7-3920QM, 3820QM and 3720QM CPUs along with the HM77, UM77, HM76 and HM75 notebook chipsets (followed by the QS77 and QM77 chipsets in May). Sources claim that other models including the Core i5-3520M, 3360M and 3320M CPUs for notebooks, and the Core i7-3667U and Core i5-3427U CPUs for ultrabooks will officially be unveiled at a later date.

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  • 29 Hide
    TheMaristBoy , January 5, 2012 6:55 AM
    Makes me and my Core 2 Duo E7500 feel old and outdated -___-
  • 17 Hide
    AstroTC , January 5, 2012 9:04 AM
    Personally I hate the new naming scheme for Intel and AMD
  • 15 Hide
    dark_knight33 , January 5, 2012 10:23 AM
    Woah, number confusion here. All the model numbers with very little differentiation, save for a single letter at the end in some cases, does not exactly make it easy for a consumer to know what to ask for, let alone know what he is getting. Pretty short sighted of Intel marketing.

    Take i7 (sock 1366) for example:
    920
    930
    950
    etc

    Pretty clear that an increase in model number corresponds with an increase in performance.

    3770
    3770K
    3770S
    3770T

    I can see the customers in Microcenter waiting to buy a cpu, scratching their head and trying to ask what the difference is, all the while trying not to be embarrassed about having to ask. Even worse, when you get an associate who "knows it all" and instead of just answering the question proceeds to pepper the customer with questions like "Well what are you trying to do with your computer?" I mean really... Just answer the damn question!

    I know what the different model numbers mean, but most people don't. I see it time and time again when I'm in there to buy parts. I feel like I have to answer another customer's questions because it's not already clear.
Other Comments
  • 29 Hide
    TheMaristBoy , January 5, 2012 6:55 AM
    Makes me and my Core 2 Duo E7500 feel old and outdated -___-
  • 14 Hide
    Thunderfox , January 5, 2012 8:36 AM
    TheMaristBoyMakes me and my Core 2 Duo E7500 feel old and outdated -___-

    Lucky you. I still have an E6400 from August 2006. Just waiting for Ivy Bridge...
  • 17 Hide
    AstroTC , January 5, 2012 9:04 AM
    Personally I hate the new naming scheme for Intel and AMD
  • 1 Hide
    ojas , January 5, 2012 10:02 AM
    AstroTCPersonally I hate the new naming scheme for Intel and AMD

    the new naming scheme actually makes sense to me...the only one that didn't was that of the first generation Core i3/i5/i7 procs.
  • 15 Hide
    dark_knight33 , January 5, 2012 10:23 AM
    Woah, number confusion here. All the model numbers with very little differentiation, save for a single letter at the end in some cases, does not exactly make it easy for a consumer to know what to ask for, let alone know what he is getting. Pretty short sighted of Intel marketing.

    Take i7 (sock 1366) for example:
    920
    930
    950
    etc

    Pretty clear that an increase in model number corresponds with an increase in performance.

    3770
    3770K
    3770S
    3770T

    I can see the customers in Microcenter waiting to buy a cpu, scratching their head and trying to ask what the difference is, all the while trying not to be embarrassed about having to ask. Even worse, when you get an associate who "knows it all" and instead of just answering the question proceeds to pepper the customer with questions like "Well what are you trying to do with your computer?" I mean really... Just answer the damn question!

    I know what the different model numbers mean, but most people don't. I see it time and time again when I'm in there to buy parts. I feel like I have to answer another customer's questions because it's not already clear.
  • 13 Hide
    lradunovic77 , January 5, 2012 11:39 AM
    Too many versions. What happened with old days Pentium II 166Mhz, Pentium II 200Mhz
  • 7 Hide
    rflynn88 , January 5, 2012 11:59 AM
    lradunovic77Too many versions. What happened with old days Pentium II 166Mhz, Pentium II 200Mhz


    Well there never was a 166MHz or 200MHz Pentium II, they were 233, 266, 300, 333, 350, 400, and 450MHz. Regardless, after intel got a lot of flak for ramping up clock speeds at the expense of IPC with Netburst, MHz/GHz wasn't cool anymore. Intel jumped on the model numbering bandwagon to make it easier for consumers to select CPUs without having to worry about why a 3GHz Pentium 4 was slower than a 2.4GHz Core 2 Duo. IMO, the model numbers just create a new form of confusion among the uninformed computer buying public.
  • 2 Hide
    dickcheney , January 5, 2012 12:19 PM
    dark_knight33I know what the different model numbers mean, but most people don't. I see it time and time again when I'm in there to buy parts. I feel like I have to answer another customer's questions because it's not already clear.


    If you know your stuff like I do, why are you going to a brick and mortar store to buy a CPU in the first place?

    Tigerdirect, newegg and NCIX. Store are for OEM retail computers.
  • 0 Hide
    SR-71 Blackbird , January 5, 2012 12:31 PM
    In with the new out with the old!
  • 6 Hide
    TeraMedia , January 5, 2012 12:38 PM
    @TheMaristBoy:

    I would be saying, "Wow, makes me and my Pentium D 940 on a 955 Express MB feel old and out-dated." Yeah, I'm amazed that I managed to keep my hardware platform running and usable all the way through Core (I started on a D 830), Core 2, Core i, and now some of Core i 2, along with O/S upgrades from Win XP MCE 2K5 x86 to Win 7 Ultimate x64. With IB and Llano out, it will definitely be high time for an upgrade.
  • 6 Hide
    JohnA , January 5, 2012 1:47 PM
    I'm building a new PC next month, and I've looked hard at going with Intel this time. I'm having second thoughts, though. I built this one 5 years ago, AM2 with a single core Athlon 3500 when I built it. With a bios upgrade, I can still use every new processor in AMD's lineup, other than the FX. How many sockets has Intel gone through in that time? Upgrading has a very short future with Intel. I've saved a bunch of money not having to do the MB with the processor upgrades, and have done proc/video card upgrades for the same kind of money as a proc/mobo upgrade from Intel. The problem is right now an FX proc and mobo is in the same ballpark as an i5 and mobo, and would give me better performance in the SHORT term. But I have no doubt in a couple years the 1155 line wont offer any better choices than I have now. Tough call...
  • 9 Hide
    gigantor21 , January 5, 2012 1:53 PM
    dickcheneyIf you know your stuff like I do, why are you going to a brick and mortar store to buy a CPU in the first place? Tigerdirect, newegg and NCIX. Store are for OEM retail computers.


    Because at Microcenter--the one I live near, anyway--the processors can go for $30-40 cheaper than on Newegg or TigerDirect. And I don't have to wait for it to ship. Power supplies and video cards, meanwhile, are overpriced as all hell, so that's probably where they make up the difference.

    At any rate, I'm surprised they still make 775 processors at all. Isn't that, like, 3-4 generations old at this point?
  • 8 Hide
    TeraMedia , January 5, 2012 2:32 PM
    @JohnA:

    How will an FX beat an i5? If you O/C, the 2500K continues to be a nearly unbeatable value. If you can get an 1155 MoBo that supports IB, then you will have a strong-performing platform that will likely out-do most of AMD's best for at least the next year, as well as a near-term upgrade path to IB that will probably out-do AMD for the next 2 years. You don't need to upgrade the CPU (and go through the hassle of doing so) if your CPU is already sufficient for your needs (and better than most AMD CPUs you could get, anyway).

    I'm not an Intel fan. I have both architectures in-house. But AMD is making it difficult to recommend their CPUs for anything but the most budget-oriented of builds. But don't take my word for it. Check out the most recent 2 SBM series for a more complete picture.
  • 4 Hide
    Netherscourge , January 5, 2012 2:39 PM
    I'm still rocking my i7 920. Runs everything I have without any bottlenecking. (BF3, Skyrim, Crysis lol)

    And overclocks easily.

    I'm riding this thing into the ground, along with my SUV.
  • -7 Hide
    xenol , January 5, 2012 3:13 PM
    JohnAUpgrading has a very short future with Intel.

    I'm in this camp where if you need to upgrade your CPU, you should upgrade everything else. Mostly because when you do upgrade your CPU, you have a part that's just sitting there. A lot of people don't know how to plug one in (or are afraid to) and most that do won't buy it because it's an old part.

    I mean sure, you could buy a cheapo system for that CPU to be housed in, but you've already spent as much or more than what you saved. And you could keep the CPU in the event of the unforeseen, but in my experience, that never has happened.

    So yeah, long story short, I don't get the point of upgrading a CPU.
  • -3 Hide
    srgess , January 5, 2012 3:47 PM
    I didnt know those cpu exist ! At some point they are useless there some cpu that is the best price /$ so why make one between a good one and a bad one if that price is only 20$ difference or so. Its like hard drive pricing before the flood, 59$ for 1TB and 69$ for 2TB and 129$ for 3TB. Why buy a 1TB when for 10$ you get twice.
  • 3 Hide
    misterbutthead , January 5, 2012 4:04 PM
    All these new chips by Intel, yet here I am typing away on my P4 3.6.
  • 5 Hide
    AMD_pitbull , January 5, 2012 4:49 PM
    srgessI didnt know those cpu exist ! At some point they are useless there some cpu that is the best price /$ so why make one between a good one and a bad one if that price is only 20$ difference or so. Its like hard drive pricing before the flood, 59$ for 1TB and 69$ for 2TB and 129$ for 3TB. Why buy a 1TB when for 10$ you get twice.

    The biggest problem with that, being, not all systems would be able to recognize the full capacity of the drives. Also, 2 raided 1tb HDD's would be 20 cheaper, and might be all that person needs. Just to give a retort to the question, not to start something else completely different. Seen enough flaming in regards HDDs lately, especially with all the new SDDs coming out.

    In regards to the Intel naming scheme, all the sub-names (K, S, T and so on) all have different price points. The type of people I've seen that don't know enough about CPUs to understand that, are the same that usually say "well, why is this chip more than this one. They're both quad cores, right?" That being said, people like that who walk into places like microcenter will have no issues as long as the guy there knows wtf he's talking about. The people that don't like asking are the same one's who like to say they know everything and put people down, but, refuse to learn it themselves, and, I say let them get screwed on a deal. For the odd GOOD person that does, it's far out-weighed by the many bad ones that should. I can remember when I started system building. I asked. That's like defending people that wanna put a car together but have no idea what they're doing. You can't say Ford or Chrysler should chance naming of products to accommodate the few that wanna try to show off and know nothing. Long story short, you don't know what you're buying, do the research. If you don't, you're just asking to get taken. It's all in the same line as TVs, Cars, jewelry, etc. Do the homework.

    Cheers.
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