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Intel's Creates New Protection Plan Just for Overclockers

By , Kevin Parrish - Source: Intel | B 37 comments

Intel has announce its Performance Tuning Protection Plan for a worry free overclocking experience.

There's really no need to define what overclocking is all about here at Tom's, but readers know that pushing a CPU too far can result in a useless, burned-up processor and other damaged system components. To some degree, overclocking is good business for Intel and AMD, as it means there's a good chance tweakers will be back for more hardware. But on the other hand, they can't fully endorse overclocking due to liability reasons.

That's where Intel's new program comes in. Intel has announced a pilot program to provide users with warranty protection for when they experiment with the overclocking features of their processor. For a small price, Intel will provide a one-time replacement of certain processors that are damaged through overclocking and/or over-volting. The protection plan is an addition to Intel's standard 3 year warranty on its processors.

The program starts as of January 18, 2012, at 12:01AM PST and last for six months. The first part of the pilot program will include four resellers: CyberPower, Canada Computers and Electronics, Scan Computers, and Altech Computers, with additional resellers being added in February. Intel will make the plan available to its customers any time during the pilot by visiting its website. As with all pilot programs, Intel may decide to cancel the program at any time or continue on past the six month pilot. Intel will honor all plans purchased prior to the date of discontinuation and will be honored according to the terms and conditions accompanying the Plan at the time of such purchase

The Performance Tuning Protection Plan covers the following CPUs:

  • Core i5-2500K - $20
  • Core i7-2600K - $25
  • Core i7-2700K - $25
  • Core i7-3930K - $35
  • Core i7-3960X - $35
     

The number of covered processors seemingly indicates how many chips Intel expects to replace. After all, most chipsets have thermal and voltage safeguards built-in to prevent damage caused by overheated CPUs that are being pushed beyond their breaking point. Usually when a CPU becomes unstable due to overclocking, they return to their default settings before damage occurs. The number of customers who will actually need to use this plan will likely be relatively small, but there's a good chance a large number will purchase the plan anyway just in case. Better safe than sorry, no?  

Read more on the protection plan at Intel's FAQ site.

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Top Comments
  • 12 Hide
    __-_-_-__ , January 19, 2012 3:16 PM
    not bad $20 :o  I'm think gonna use this... time to burn my cpu :D 
  • 11 Hide
    geekapproved , January 19, 2012 4:26 PM
    Pray for AMD to continue in the desktop market, otherwise Intel will just charge you $1000 for an overclockable cpu like they used to.
  • 10 Hide
    GreaseMonkey_62 , January 19, 2012 3:38 PM
    Money, money, money. And Intel's revenue continues to go up. Nice play Intel.
Other Comments
    Display all 37 comments.
  • 12 Hide
    __-_-_-__ , January 19, 2012 3:16 PM
    not bad $20 :o  I'm think gonna use this... time to burn my cpu :D 
  • 3 Hide
    asukafan2001 , January 19, 2012 3:19 PM
    This is actually a pretty good deal for the price. Especially if you are purchasing a higher end CPU or a Sandy Bridge e.
  • -9 Hide
    g4114rd0 , January 19, 2012 3:31 PM
    LOL the obligatory CPU insurance is being after all these years.
  • -2 Hide
    theuniquegamer , January 19, 2012 3:37 PM
    Just in time. I was planning to buy a i7 3930k and x79 with CM HYDRO H100. Now i can get it beyond 4.6 ghz on my new h100 without worrying about warranty for 1 time only. Intel should extend this type of programe more than 6months so that more overclockers could use the capabilities of upcoming ivy bridge in march or so without worry about warranty.
  • 10 Hide
    GreaseMonkey_62 , January 19, 2012 3:38 PM
    Money, money, money. And Intel's revenue continues to go up. Nice play Intel.
  • -3 Hide
    molo9000 , January 19, 2012 3:56 PM
    6 months isn't a very long time frame.
    How many people actually kill their CPU in the first 6 months? This is just for people, who do extreme overclocks.

    I guess one benefit is, that you can get a replacement if your particular CPU doesn't overclock well. Just fry it and ask Intel for a (hopefully better) replacement.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , January 19, 2012 3:57 PM
    This is great decision by the marketing folks at Intel. By introducing this safe guard Intel is encouraging novices and people that are generally careful to try out overclocking with confidence for only a small price premium. As a long term offering i can only imagine that such a option would generate more sales as novices take the plunge in order to develop the skills. One could read all of the how-to's on the internet but no-one has become a master Overclocker without cracking a few eggs in the process.
  • -1 Hide
    gm0n3y , January 19, 2012 3:58 PM
    Maybe I'm missing something, but can't you just return a fried CPU under warranty even if it was overclocked? How would the retailer know?
  • 2 Hide
    clonazepam , January 19, 2012 4:04 PM
    I'm already done experimenting with the 2600k. I pushed it up to 5.1xx ghz with 1.42x volts and squeezed out some super pi times. If I paid $25, the only reason would be to try for 5.5 and have a safety net. I'll pass. The thrill isn't the same w/o some danger and consequences.
  • 5 Hide
    JasonAkkerman , January 19, 2012 4:06 PM
    Hmm.. get your chip home to find out it's not a good overclocker. Burn it with some crazy voltage (I have always wanted to do this), get a new. Profit!

    Seriously though, in all my years of OCing I have never lost a CPU or graphics card. I can't see myself buying this.

    Once you get to the point of needing this protection plan, you have overclocked your CPU so far you aren't just entering into the land of diminishing returns, you are practically drag racing though it.
  • -1 Hide
    geekapproved , January 19, 2012 4:25 PM
    Laughable way for Intel to bend you over yet again.

    They can't fully endorse overclocking due to liability reasons??? Then what are the unlocked processors that they charge extra for????

    As if an enthusiest's/overclocker's need warranty after 3yrs anyways, what a joke.
  • 11 Hide
    geekapproved , January 19, 2012 4:26 PM
    Pray for AMD to continue in the desktop market, otherwise Intel will just charge you $1000 for an overclockable cpu like they used to.
  • -7 Hide
    Jprobes , January 19, 2012 4:38 PM
    clonazepamI'm already done experimenting with the 2600k. I pushed it up to 5.1xx ghz with 1.42x volts and squeezed out some super pi times. If I paid $25, the only reason would be to try for 5.5 and have a safety net. I'll pass. The thrill isn't the same w/o some danger and consequences.


    I know the feeling. The only reason I own a gun is to play Russian roulette with it. But as fun as that is, its only thrilling when I knowingly do it without having health insurance....
  • 7 Hide
    intel4eva , January 19, 2012 5:06 PM
    There's no way in hell I'm not buying this plan.... Now the enthusiast community can get a significant amount of data on what long term (6 months) safe voltages for enthusiast chips are. You have NO IDEA what a big thing this is on expensive chips. Few will try to take a 3930 or 3960 to the max and see if it still works in 6 months, and their reports are too few in numbers to mean anything. If this program keeps up, it will make safe overclocking easier for those who have no intention of burning their chip.
  • 3 Hide
    NuclearShadow , January 19, 2012 5:21 PM
    A good friend and I have a idea for liquid cooling this would make the prototype much less risky.
    We would no doubt push the CPU's to the limits while testing. This can save us quite a bit of money. Time to call him up and get started.
  • 1 Hide
    victorious 3930k , January 19, 2012 5:22 PM
    molo90006 months isn't a very long time frame.How many people actually kill their CPU in the first 6 months? This is just for people, who do extreme overclocks.I guess one benefit is, that you can get a replacement if your particular CPU doesn't overclock well. Just fry it and ask Intel for a (hopefully better) replacement.

    Expect me to (maybe) do that.
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