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LaCie CloudBox Stores Data Locally & in Cloud

By - Source: CNET | B 15 comments

Here's a 100 GB hybrid device that will store your files both locally and in the cloud... for a fee, naturally.

Earlier this week, LaCie revealed a hybrid network-based storage device that backs up data both locally and to the cloud. Called the CloudBox, it initially uploads up to 100 GB of data over a long (long) period of time. After that, new and altered files are backed up on a daily basis.

"Just copy and paste your files to your CloudBox, and they will automatically be backed up online daily," reads the product description. "It’s that simple: your data is backed up on a local hard drive and again in the cloud for double protection. The CloudBox includes a one-year online backup contract for 100 GB, which can be easily renewed."

As previously started, the CloudBox connects to an existing home or business network. Using the provided software, consumers then back up their data to the device's internal 100 GB HDD. The CloudBox then silently uploads all that data on its own, leaving the end-user free to shut down the computer or play long stretches of Farmville uninterrupted.

As CNET points out, backing up 100 GB of data will seemingly take forever. For example, a dedicated, full T1 upload connection (1.5 Mbps) would take around one week to completely upload the entire load. In the real world, a non-dedicated T1 connection will likely take 30 to 60 days to upload 100 GB worth of data. Still, once everything is backed up in the cloud, users can "set it and forget it" until they need to retrieve the data again in case of damage or theft... as long as the subscription is kept active, that is.

According to Lacie, the CloudBox features military-grade 128-bit AES encryption. "Your password is truly secure and not stored online, so no one - not even LaCie - can access your online backup. What’s more, every file is encrypted with military-grade 128-bit AES before being uploaded," the company said. "You can be confident that all of your data is safe and secure in the cloud, no matter what happens to the CloudBox itself."

The LaCie CloudBox hasn't arrived here in the States as of this writing, but interested consumers can head here to sign up for notification when it arrives. The device will sport a $199.99 pricetag, compatibility with both PC and Mac machines, a 2-year warranty and a free subscription for one year. After that, users will be required to shell out $100 per year for the 100 GB cloud storage.

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  • 0 Hide
    rohitbaran , June 24, 2011 1:33 AM
    It is expensive, $100 a year for 100 GB. Well, cloud services will get cheaper with time hopefully. Nice concept though!
  • 0 Hide
    Gamer-girl , June 24, 2011 1:56 AM
    mozy already does this, you can use any external hard or usb stick.
  • 0 Hide
    someguynamedmatt , June 24, 2011 3:51 AM
    ...or, I could just have my data happily humming beside me in a RAID 10 array, and not give these people any of my money whatsoever. That sounds like a better plan to me. I've got bigger things to worry about if my system spontaneously combusts.
  • 0 Hide
    alidan , June 24, 2011 7:25 AM
    rohitbaranIt is expensive, $100 a year for 100 GB. Well, cloud services will get cheaper with time hopefully. Nice concept though!


    well its an offsite backup, and you have to imagine that there are at least 3 mirrors of the data on their servers, so its realistically 300gb of storage and 200gb of that is redundancy.
  • 1 Hide
    back_by_demand , June 24, 2011 10:28 AM
    I guess the 8Tb of storage I have in a big fat dedicated NAS would take between 6.5 and 13 years.

    Cloud storage may be a good idea in principle but face it, as soon as someone gets over 1Tb of data the time to upload it makes using the Cloud an unfeasible option until internet speeds go up by a factor of at least 100.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , June 24, 2011 12:13 PM
    @someguynamedmatt
    RAIDs do not protect data in case of a fire or if data corruption (such as a virus) which only offsite storage does

  • 1 Hide
    loutech4free , June 24, 2011 1:22 PM
    "... and you have to imagine that there are at least 3 mirrors of the data on their servers, so its realistically 300gb of storage and 200gb of that is redundancy."
    If they do it correctly and not like some LMFAO rainforest Ossi cloud company
    http://www.watoday.com.au/technology/security/4800-aussie-sites-evaporate-after-hack-20110621-1gd1h.html
  • 0 Hide
    kriminal , June 24, 2011 2:01 PM
    WOW at that link!
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , June 24, 2011 2:55 PM
    For $100/year you can buy approx 3 100 GB hard drives, make copies of your data, and store them at your friend's house.

    I realize that this is a poor comparison, as what you are paying for is obviously not storage space, but the convenience of having a completely automated off-site backup solution. This is obviously good for data that is being worked on / updated very often, but probably a poor choice for static types of content such as collections of photos or music.
  • 0 Hide
    huron , June 24, 2011 3:03 PM
    back_by_demandI guess the 8Tb of storage I have in a big fat dedicated NAS would take between 6.5 and 13 years.Cloud storage may be a good idea in principle but face it, as soon as someone gets over 1Tb of data the time to upload it makes using the Cloud an unfeasible option until internet speeds go up by a factor of at least 100.


    I'm not arguing for against the cloud, but really it's not the cloud that is the problem, but the network connection to get there. Here's hoping that bandwidth will increase for a lower price at some point soon, or cloud adoption will be difficult to sell to the masses.

    The $100 for 100GB seems a bit high myself. Again, hopefully the cost will come down over time.
  • 0 Hide
    ltbob , June 24, 2011 4:46 PM
    Wow say good bye to my bandwidth if I get this
  • 0 Hide
    Da_Man , June 26, 2011 4:42 PM
    wow imagine if i use that service, my upload speed is only a mere 128kbps (16KB/sec) lmao
  • 0 Hide
    eddieroolz , June 27, 2011 5:45 AM
    This is obviously predicated on having a good upstream bandwidth, but unfortunately users outside East Asia don't.
  • 0 Hide
    fir_ser , June 27, 2011 10:26 PM
    This is a new type pf hybrid storage.
  • 0 Hide
    fir_ser , June 27, 2011 10:35 PM
    The price tag of $200 is expensive.