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Apple Hires Former Windows Security Hacker for OS X

By - Source: Wired | B 27 comments

Apple has brought in the big guns.

For a long time, Macs were generally considered fairly safe in terms of malware because there wasn't very many Macs out there. The fact that the number of Macs was relatively small compared to the countless PCs deployed in universities, offices and homes around the world meant Windows machines were a much more likely target for cyber villains. However, as the Mac brand has grown in popularity, the machines are more at risk for malware attacks.

In an apparent effort to bolster Mac OS X security, Apple has hired a security expert that previously worked on locking down Microsoft's Vista OS. Kristin Paget was hired by Microsoft, along with a few other hackers, to try and find bugs and holes in Windows Vista. Now it seems Piget is working with Apple.

Wired reports that Paget's LinkedIn currently has her listed as a core operating system security researcher at Apple. While she wouldn't comment on the nature of her work (Apple also declined to elaborate on her employment with the company), the title would suggest she's lending a hand to keep OS X air tight.

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Top Comments
  • 27 Hide
    A Bad Day , December 9, 2012 12:17 PM
    What? Apple's not going to stick to their cover-up policy?
  • 21 Hide
    sixdegree , December 9, 2012 12:13 PM
    Finally, they starts to address the fact that OSX platform can have virus and malware. This is a step to the right direction.
  • 13 Hide
    A Bad Day , December 9, 2012 2:18 PM
    shahrooza security expert that previously worked on locking down Microsoft's Vista OS.....


    Vista's security is better than XP's given the new additional features.
Other Comments
  • 21 Hide
    sixdegree , December 9, 2012 12:13 PM
    Finally, they starts to address the fact that OSX platform can have virus and malware. This is a step to the right direction.
  • 27 Hide
    A Bad Day , December 9, 2012 12:17 PM
    What? Apple's not going to stick to their cover-up policy?
  • 12 Hide
    nforce4max , December 9, 2012 1:07 PM
    His work is going to be fairly easy for a while searching for holes and exploits in OSX given just how weak the security is in that os. The only thing that stops most from making malware for osx is that there is no existing wealth of scripts, how to guides for writing malware for osx, and that the os is vastly different from windows as well linux when it comes to the commands. Simple phishing and spyware programs will likely be the biggest threat to Mac users in the future.
  • -9 Hide
    shahrooz , December 9, 2012 1:54 PM
    a security expert that previously worked on locking down Microsoft's Vista OS.....
  • 13 Hide
    A Bad Day , December 9, 2012 2:18 PM
    shahrooza security expert that previously worked on locking down Microsoft's Vista OS.....


    Vista's security is better than XP's given the new additional features.
  • 1 Hide
    SoiledBottom , December 9, 2012 2:28 PM
    This is why I love Tom's

    Kristin "Paget" was hired by Microsoft....before

    Now it seems "Piget" is working with Apple....after



  • 2 Hide
    COLGeek , December 9, 2012 3:01 PM
    So many uninformed haters and nothing will ever change that. Any OS can be made unsafe or secure (at least more secure). The operator/user is the major problem that needs to be "fixed".

    Think about it.
  • -7 Hide
    bak0n , December 9, 2012 3:03 PM
    Apple is very secure. They only let you do limited things with their hardware and software so by default it is secure.
  • -7 Hide
    gerchokas , December 9, 2012 3:18 PM
    Mac OS is a derivative of BSD, which is like a cousin of linux. Even if its not a very original OS (Microsoft created their OS entirely by themselves) it has the strengths of BSD in terms of security - which is very high
  • 5 Hide
    madjimms , December 9, 2012 3:54 PM
    gerchokasMac OS is a derivative of BSD, which is like a cousin of linux. Even if its not a very original OS (Microsoft created their OS entirely by themselves) it has the strengths of BSD in terms of security - which is very high

    Umm... you do know that the version of BSD that was used was REAAAALLLLYYY old right?
  • 8 Hide
    house70 , December 9, 2012 4:08 PM
    They probably got tired of having their system be the first to bite the dust and every white-hat conference.
  • 0 Hide
    ashwinsinghgr8 , December 9, 2012 4:11 PM
    nforce4maxHis work is going to be fairly easy for a while searching for holes and exploits in OSX given just how weak the security is in that os. The only thing that stops most from making malware for osx is that there is no existing wealth of scripts, how to guides for writing malware for osx, and that the os is vastly different from windows as well linux when it comes to the commands. Simple phishing and spyware programs will likely be the biggest threat to Mac users in the future.

    He changed his gender, he is now a she. https://www.google.co.in/search?q=Chris+Paget&sugexp=chrome,mod%3D0&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=wtPEUJ2KC8XqrQe-h4DgBQ&biw=1366&bih=643&sei=x9PEUKaNF8r5rAefmYG4Dg
  • 3 Hide
    house70 , December 9, 2012 4:14 PM
    nforce4maxHis work is going to be fairly easy for a while searching for holes and exploits in OSX given just how weak the security is in that os. The only thing that stops most from making malware for osx is that there is no existing wealth of scripts, how to guides for writing malware for osx, and that the os is vastly different from windows as well linux when it comes to the commands. Simple phishing and spyware programs will likely be the biggest threat to Mac users in the future.

    Actually, I believe that the main reason why people have not bothered to create malware for OSX is simply because that's not where the money is; it's used by a handful of architects, artists and that's about it. Individuals using whatever OS for personal computing have never been the target of real hacking, instead large companies have been attacked because that's where a profit can be made. Currently, nobody gives a frack about OSX and it's small user base.
  • -1 Hide
    gerchokas , December 9, 2012 4:20 PM
    What I mean is that it inherited the idiosyncrasies of the BSD/linux OSes which make them more secure than other OSes from the start, like for example the division between User and Superusers: only a superuser (or a user part of the Wheel group) can change system configs or even install software. That very simple (an old) feature cripples malware posibility of infection.
    The original code has surely been modified 100% since that time, but the general "architecture" is still there.
  • -9 Hide
    kellybean , December 9, 2012 4:40 PM
    gerchokasMac OS is a derivative of BSD, which is like a cousin of linux. Even if its not a very original OS (Microsoft created their OS entirely by themselves) it has the strengths of BSD in terms of security - which is very high

    Wrong batman. Gates basically stole MS DOS then copied a UI idea to put a UI on top of DOS, aka Windows. Gates is just another thief and bully in the business arena.
  • 8 Hide
    A Bad Day , December 9, 2012 5:23 PM
    kellybeanWrong batman. Gates basically stole MS DOS then copied a UI idea to put a UI on top of DOS, aka Windows. Gates is just another thief and bully in the business arena.


    Actually, he bought licensing rights from the now-long-defunct Seattle Computer Products company and rebranded it. Nothing wrong with that as long as the contract allows it.
  • 1 Hide
    A Bad Day , December 9, 2012 5:26 PM
    EDIT: Wait, are you saying that he STOLE his own product? Hilarious, because MS-DOS is a property of Microsoft.

    And also, the only major Windows versions that used GUI + DOS was Windows 95, 98, and ME. All of the major Windows versions intended for professional or server work were kernel-based.
  • 0 Hide
    A Bad Day , December 9, 2012 5:26 PM
    EDIT: I meant most of the major Windows versions intended for professional or server work were kernel-based.
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