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The Velox V70 Will Re-Write Your SSD Experience

By - Source: Silicon Power Email | B 49 comments

Silicon Power says its new golden SSD will re-write your experience.

Silicon Power said on Tuesday that its new 2.5-inch Velox V70 SSD will re-write everyone's SSD experience thanks to a powerful combination of new built-in Toggle/Synchronous flash, an advanced controller and firmware. It's also coated in metallic gold, bringing a rich, pretty sparkle to the dull innards of your desktop (unless it's already lit up like a Christmas tree, of course).

"Unlike the traditional SSD, Velox V70 features optimized firmware and advanced Toggle/Synchronous NAND flash while utilizing the latest SandForce SF-2281 controller," the company said. "With faster computer startup time and application launch time, V70 can greatly change your SSD experience and is ideal for professional users for video & audio editing, gaming and multiple tasking."

The specs report that the SSD has a maximum read speed of 557 MB/s and a maximum write speed of 507 MB/s. It also features a random 4K write speed of up to 86000 IOPS, a SATA III 6 Gb/s connector (backwards compatible to SATA II 3 Gb/s), support for TRIM and Garbage Collection technology, and a built-in SMART monitoring system. It's equipped with DuraWrite and wear leveling, and is implemented with ECC technology to guarantee data transmission reliability.

"Apart from the accelerated transferring rate, V70 is also a more durable and reliable storage device. It is able to endure more write cycles and significantly expands the life-span of your SSD," Silicon Power said, adding that it comes with a three year warranty.

The Velox V70 SSD arrives in capacities of 60 GB, 120 GB, 240 GB and 480 GB. Actual availability and pricing is unknown at this point, so stay tuned or keep checking back with your favorite online retailer to see if the drive is available.

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Top Comments
  • 29 Hide
    freggo , July 18, 2012 1:09 PM
    "coated in metallic gold, bringing a rich, pretty sparkle"

    Yes, a "pretty sparkle" is a huge incentive to purchase internal computer parts :-)

  • 22 Hide
    Onus , July 18, 2012 1:19 PM
    The story is meaningless without prices. Just seeing "Sandforce" raised a red flag.
  • 16 Hide
    willard , July 18, 2012 1:51 PM
    Rewriting the SSD experience with stats nearly identical to every other high end SSD? Yeah, totally a game changer.
Other Comments
  • 13 Hide
    serendipiti , July 18, 2012 1:06 PM
    njtfirst flash/ssds now the 1st phase change memory has shipped, products that have an inherent write lifetime limit. these are excellent in a phone or tablet where you'll never hit that ceiling, and in a number of server roles to cut down on power and heat, but imho not on the desktop. there are better alternatives in the pipeline without such a built-in weakness. not much reason to have taken such a long development time either, but of course people are happy to sell you devices with planned obsolescence at a higher price. you shouldn't be buying into these techs, stick to hdds until the good stuff comes.

    have you tried any ? I suppose you don't. Don't even touch one of them or you could get SSDholic as me... ;) 
    It has little to do with boot time, it has to do with response times (specially when the hdd keeps spinning and spinning...), and to me it's worth the price, and I think that we often overlook that amount of money when choosing the CPU or GPU...
  • 29 Hide
    freggo , July 18, 2012 1:09 PM
    "coated in metallic gold, bringing a rich, pretty sparkle"

    Yes, a "pretty sparkle" is a huge incentive to purchase internal computer parts :-)

  • -9 Hide
    phishy714 , July 18, 2012 1:19 PM
    Quote:
    "Unlike the traditional SSD, Velox V70 features optimized firmware and advanced Toggle/Synchronous NAND flash while utilizing the latest SandForce SF-2281 controller,"


    Quote:
    The specs report that the SSD has a maximum read speed of 557 MB/s and a maximum write speed of 507 MB/s.


    Yeah.. no.
  • 22 Hide
    Onus , July 18, 2012 1:19 PM
    The story is meaningless without prices. Just seeing "Sandforce" raised a red flag.
  • 9 Hide
    master_chen , July 18, 2012 1:34 PM
    >SandForce

    Yeah, no.

    I'll stay with my 120 GB Intel 510 (Which is THE best mid-range SSD on the market right now AND uses high-quality Marvell controller), thank you very much.
  • -4 Hide
    master_chen , July 18, 2012 1:36 PM
    freggoa "pretty sparkle"

    SPARKLE SPARKLE SPARKLE!
  • 15 Hide
    belardo , July 18, 2012 1:39 PM
    Painting parts in shiny colors makes them faster and cooler.

    Anyone remember the Soyo Dragon motherboards? They were white/silver motherboards. Their salespeople/techs said "its color makes the motherboard run cooler"! I bought one for the feature set, not the color/marketing. And it did LOOK very good in a silver-brushed aluminum case. One of the stand-off holes didn't match exactly (2mm off) and it was one of the most unreliable POS products I ever touched. SOYO died within a year or so. google the "soyo dragon" images.

    Yes, the gold looks good...
  • 8 Hide
    master_chen , July 18, 2012 1:47 PM
    belardoPainting parts in shiny colors makes them faster


    DA RED GOEZ FAZTA!
  • 16 Hide
    willard , July 18, 2012 1:51 PM
    Rewriting the SSD experience with stats nearly identical to every other high end SSD? Yeah, totally a game changer.
  • 13 Hide
    CaedenV , July 18, 2012 1:54 PM
    master_chenSPARKLE SPARKLE SPARKLE!

    a sparkly SSD is about as useful and wanted as a sparkly vampire
  • 3 Hide
    master_chen , July 18, 2012 1:57 PM
    caedenva sparkly SSD is about as useful and wanted as a sparkly vampire

    Alec Baldwin is looking at you right now, with a very sad expression on his face.
  • 13 Hide
    Fabel , July 18, 2012 2:00 PM
    njtfirst flash/ssds now the 1st phase change memory has shipped, products that have an inherent write lifetime limit. these are excellent in a phone or tablet where you'll never hit that ceiling, and in a number of server roles to cut down on power and heat, but imho not on the desktop. there are better alternatives in the pipeline without such a built-in weakness. not much reason to have taken such a long development time either, but of course people are happy to sell you devices with planned obsolescence at a higher price. you shouldn't be buying into these techs, stick to hdds until the good stuff comes.


    After 3 years my first SSD (first gen 80GB Intel) is still showing less than 5% percent wear. After 2 years my second SSD (second gen 160GB Intel) is at 2% wear. Capacities (and speeds) will be totally useless well before they wear out. I only got HDD's on my media server and only for media, the system drive is a SSD too.

    There are situations where an SSD may not be advisable, but for most users, In my experience of real world daily usage, on average HDDs got a shorter lifetime due to mechanical or electric failure. Furthermore, my oldest HDD is a 320GB IDE unit, and it is 7 years old and soon to be retired. By now my SSDs have proven me they can outlast any of my HDD.

    Interface (IDE anyone?), speed, and increasing unrealibility as a mechanical drive ages are way higher concerns than wearing on a SSD.

    Cost/capacity are the only concerns and if you can afford it really specific intesive writing usage is the only weakness. You can keep waiting until the good stuff comes, I'm enjoying the good stuff NOW.



  • 2 Hide
    shin0bi272 , July 18, 2012 2:19 PM
    Id still rather have PCM but this is still nice.
  • -3 Hide
    master_chen , July 18, 2012 2:21 PM
    shin0bi272Id still rather have PCM


    I hope that you really meant PCI, not PCM... :\
  • 11 Hide
    CaedenV , July 18, 2012 2:24 PM
    njtfirst flash/ssds now the 1st phase change memory has shipped, products that have an inherent write lifetime limit. these are excellent in a phone or tablet where you'll never hit that ceiling, and in a number of server roles to cut down on power and heat, but imho not on the desktop. there are better alternatives in the pipeline without such a built-in weakness. not much reason to have taken such a long development time either, but of course people are happy to sell you devices with planned obsolescence at a higher price. you shouldn't be buying into these techs, stick to hdds until the good stuff comes.

    Let us do a little bit of math shall we?
    Windows ~20GB
    Office, browsers, productivity software, and utilities ~15GB
    Games ~10GB each, and we will go on a limb and say ~60GB total
    Cache is equal to the amount of ram in the system so ~8GB
    Small documents that you want to keep on the SSD for faster access time ~5GB
    Total system drive we will round up to 120GB, which means that you need to purchase a 240GB SSD (because like HDDs you want to keep under 80% usage, granted it is for different reasons).

    On average, a cheap consumer SSD (read: OCZ and Mushkin) can rewrite 100,000 times per block, times 500,000 blocks per 64GB, times 4 because we are getting a 240GB drive= 200,000,000,000 (200 billion) writes to a drive over its lifetime. All modern drives have write leveling, so your drive will wear down relatively evenly.
    200 Billion writes divided by an expected replacement time of 6 years (that is my expected time frame anyways), and that gives ~33.3 Billion writes per year, or ~91.3 Million writes per day
    That is 3.8 Million writes per hour, every hour, of every day, for 6 years. If you have a higher end drive then the write endurance is a bit higher, and this is not including the buffer allocated on sand force drives (nobody makes a 240GB drive, it is a 256GB drive with a 16GB buffer for ECC and bad flash replacement over time). Personally, my desktop does not see anything near those types on loads as it just houses my documents (which are tiny), internet cache (which is admitedly heavy, but still nothing in the grand scheme of things), RAM cache (which is untouched because I have 16GB of RAM), Games (which while they take space, do not write more than updates and save files), and Windows itself (which only makes changes on the order of MBs per day)

    Add to that the studies put out by Google and other groups that own large server farms who say that SSDs last as long or longer than traditional drives. Yes, early failures do happen, so keep a backup of your important data (as you should anyways), but to think that SSD technology is any less reliable than a platter spinning some 5,400-10,000 times a minute is just silly talk.
  • 5 Hide
    CaedenV , July 18, 2012 2:28 PM
    FabelCost/capacity are the only concerns and if you can afford it really specific intesive writing usage is the only weakness..

    And let us not forget that the time saved on heavy write operations (like video editing and encoding) will more than pay for the cost of the drives to begin with. Sure, it may bring an early death, but you could do so many more projects in the same amount of time that it really dosn't matter.
  • 7 Hide
    JustAnotherNoob , July 18, 2012 3:21 PM
    Why is this "news" and not a "paid advertisment"?
  • 7 Hide
    tntom , July 18, 2012 3:46 PM
    JustAnotherNoobWhy is this "news" and not a "paid advertisment"?

    It is just a new product introduction. Reputable magazines and news journals have done this for years. I have no problem with it as I often find them useful for my own personal knowledge base. Just like when Tom's announces the latest generation of Intel CPUs or Radeons.
  • 2 Hide
    thebigt42 , July 18, 2012 4:32 PM
    MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A GOOD SATA III CONTROLLER!!!!
    My Intel Sata II controller runs circles around my shitty Marvell Sata III with my 520
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