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TRENDnet Launches Compact 200Mbps Powerline Adapter

By - Source: TRENDnet PR | B 11 comments

This compact network adapter extends your current network in a home or office through the electrical lines.

Looking for a way to extend your home or office network without the hassles of Ethernet cords and spotty Wi-Fi signals? Why not use the power outlet mounted in your wall instead?

On Wednesday TRENDnet released the latest edition to its Powerline AV series, the 200 Mbps Compact Powerline AV Adapter (TPL-306E) and Adapter Kit (TPL-306E2K). This adapter essentially establishes a network connection from a router to a PC via a building or home's electrical lines, but consumes less physical space on the wall outlet than previous models.

"The TPL-306E replaces and is approximately 30-percent smaller than the older TPL-303E series," the company reports. "Its small form factor saves space when plugged into a crowded electrical outlet. Network one adapter to a router and plug another adapter into any outlet on the same electrical system for instant high speed network access."

The TRENDnet adapters connect automatically to each other over a secure encrypted signal with no CD installation required. They also feature an LED display which relays device status for power management and troubleshooting. And because they're always on, TRENDnet has implemented its embedded power-saving technology which lowers power consumption by up to 70-percent in standby mode.

End users looking to set up a powerline-based extension to their network will need at least two TPL-306E adapters, costing $54.99 USD for each. However for $99.99 USD, the 200 Mbps Compact Powerline AV Adapter Kit provides two adapters to get you started.

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  • 0 Hide
    jdog2pt0 , December 22, 2011 6:12 PM
    These things are cool, but the latency on them is just too high.
  • 0 Hide
    DRosencraft , December 22, 2011 7:19 PM
    I've been looking at these things the past few months. My current wireless router (a cheapo Belkin 150 we bought a year ago in a pinch) keeps dropping out for no reason other than looking at it the wrong way. But i've read some older homes can't use them becuase they aren't compatible with older style wiring. Plus, these tend to be more expensive when compared to similar wireless router, and of course you still need to connect an ethernet cable to the thing. They're certainly not for everyone in every situation, but if you just want to get high speed internet to a single stationary unit near an outlet, these look to do the trick.
  • 0 Hide
    toothchatter , December 22, 2011 8:14 PM
    Ive tried two different versions of this product, both in houses that were less than 5 years old. it simply didnt live up to the hype. Hopefully this product works for some, but it was a no go for me.
  • 0 Hide
    dimar , December 22, 2011 8:31 PM
    Tried the older version few years ago, and recently tried the 500Mbps one. It was just too slow.
    Passing ethernet cables was the best option.
  • 1 Hide
    dthx , December 22, 2011 8:52 PM
    I tried several powerline adapters, in different (and quite modern) houses... They were ALL very unreliable and even slower than WiFi most of the time (even when their specs were 200mbps).
  • 1 Hide
    extremepcs , December 22, 2011 10:10 PM
    The $50 I spent on a spool of Cat 5e was the best investment I have made in a while.... Gigabit to every computer in my house.
  • 0 Hide
    DRosencraft , December 22, 2011 10:19 PM
    Quote:
    I tried several powerline adapters, in different (and quite modern) houses... They were ALL very unreliable and even slower than WiFi most of the time (even when their specs were 200mbps).


    Yeah, unless you go with the big money ones, these don't tend to be gigabit (they're 10/100 not 10/100/1000).

    Quote:
    The $50 I spent on a spool of Cat 5e was the best investment I have made in a while.... Gigabit to every computer in my house.


    I wish I had an organized way to this too. :pfff: 
  • 0 Hide
    nikorr , December 22, 2011 10:35 PM
    Well we'll see what the real numbers are gonna be...
  • 0 Hide
    azgard , December 22, 2011 11:34 PM
    DRosencraftI've been looking at these things the past few months. My current wireless router (a cheapo Belkin 150 we bought a year ago in a pinch) keeps dropping out for no reason other than looking at it the wrong way. But i've read some older homes can't use them becuase they aren't compatible with older style wiring. Plus, these tend to be more expensive when compared to similar wireless router, and of course you still need to connect an ethernet cable to the thing. They're certainly not for everyone in every situation, but if you just want to get high speed internet to a single stationary unit near an outlet, these look to do the trick.


    Sound's like I had a similar situation to you and this solved it perfectly for me, once I plugged them in and configured them it worked. I would also like to add as a testament to the quality these products have now, is that I was in a building unit that most likely had 16 individual apartments in some form or another sharing noise on my line, and again worked flawlessly.
    The only thing I don't like is that without looking this product up, without a doubt its really a 10/100 device with deceptive duplex speed advertising.
  • 0 Hide
    del35 , December 23, 2011 9:44 AM
    Just make sure that before using these adapters to create a network you create a customized encryption key, or your network will be accessible to anyone using the same device and less than 1000 feet in electric wire from your network. The same model devices have the same encryption key. The key is easy to change however.
  • 0 Hide
    US_Ranger , December 24, 2011 3:16 PM
    I just helped a friend run Cat-5 through his whole house while it's being built. Running cables over the roof-beams, down the walls, through an underground tube to the garage, etc. This is the way to do is for most efficiency. Unfortunately, even new houses that are being built aren't doing this. He was smart and bought all the material to do it himself right before all the guys putting the insulation came to cover the walls. Now all his rooms will have wired internet.