Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Intel Revises Heatsink Design For Desktop, Xeon CPUs

By - Source: Intel | B 55 comments

Intel said it is changing the heat sink and fan shroud design for the majority of its desktop and server processors.

Intel said it is changing the heatsink and fan shroud design for the majority of its desktop and server processors. The revision is made immediately. According to the company, this is a pure visual design change that transitions from a partial square to a round shape with no expected changes to the cooling function. The fan shroud will get "slightly larger" openings.

The products receiving the new heatsink include:

- Xeon E3-1200 series
- Xeon L3000 series
- Xeon X3000 series
- Core i7-800 series
- Core i7-2600/2700 series
- Core i7-3700 series
- Core i5-600 series
- Core i5-2300/2400/2500 series
- Core i5-3300/3400/3500 series
- Core i3-500 series
- Core i3-2100 series
- Core i3-3200 series
- Pentium G600/800 series
- Pentium G2000/6000 series
- Celeron G400/500 series

 

Contact Us for News Tips, Corrections and Feedback

Discuss
Ask a Category Expert

Create a new thread in the News comments forum about this subject

Example: Notebook, Android, SSD hard drive

This thread is closed for comments
Top Comments
  • 25 Hide
    geekapproved , August 17, 2012 4:12 PM
    Now that's news!!
  • 20 Hide
    chaz_music , August 17, 2012 4:51 PM
    It's engineering: This is a cost reduction exercise on the heatsink and a user install improvement for the frame. They can take out a slight amount of metal from the heatsink fin area that has little effectiveness (saves metal), while also using a simpler manufacturing technique that is circular. The plastic change appears to help people install it easier. In reality though, the heatsink thermal resistance will go up, ever so slightly due to the total fin surface area reduction. But overall, a good move for Intel.
  • 13 Hide
    InvalidError , August 17, 2012 5:30 PM
    Funny how Intel makes a "visual change" to stuff that is impossible to see once the HSF is mounted.
Other Comments
    Display all 55 comments.
  • 25 Hide
    geekapproved , August 17, 2012 4:12 PM
    Now that's news!!
  • 0 Hide
    phatboe , August 17, 2012 4:23 PM
    why?
  • 6 Hide
    mopman411 , August 17, 2012 4:40 PM
    Quote:
    why?


    Can't you tell, it's geekapproved
  • 0 Hide
    KelvinTy , August 17, 2012 4:51 PM
    Reverting back to the 775 platform design?
  • 20 Hide
    chaz_music , August 17, 2012 4:51 PM
    It's engineering: This is a cost reduction exercise on the heatsink and a user install improvement for the frame. They can take out a slight amount of metal from the heatsink fin area that has little effectiveness (saves metal), while also using a simpler manufacturing technique that is circular. The plastic change appears to help people install it easier. In reality though, the heatsink thermal resistance will go up, ever so slightly due to the total fin surface area reduction. But overall, a good move for Intel.
  • -3 Hide
    Be0wulf22 , August 17, 2012 4:52 PM
    Journalism 101: Who, What, Where, Why, When, How.

    You failed.
  • 5 Hide
    COLGeek , August 17, 2012 5:01 PM
    If it still uses the nearly useless "push-pin" connectors, then the new ones will go where my old ones go.....to the recycling bin. I have found Intel OEM HSFs to be pure junk because they don't mount as securely as I require.
  • 2 Hide
    freedom4556 , August 17, 2012 5:11 PM
    Quote:
    They can take out a slight amount of metal from the heatsink fin area that has little effectiveness (saves metal)


    I betcha the reason they did it now is that they upgraded the assembly robot so that it can now safely grab circles.
  • 13 Hide
    InvalidError , August 17, 2012 5:30 PM
    Funny how Intel makes a "visual change" to stuff that is impossible to see once the HSF is mounted.
  • 2 Hide
    tobydruHot , August 17, 2012 5:33 PM
    I got the new design with my I5-2500k at around October.
  • 6 Hide
    A Bad Day , August 17, 2012 5:53 PM
    So, what about the pushpins?
  • 2 Hide
    master_chen , August 17, 2012 5:57 PM
    Like I'd ever uze stock Intel CPU coolers ever again.

    (Look at my configs) I don't need any of that anymore.
  • 2 Hide
    crysex , August 17, 2012 6:19 PM
    I never used these shyts. I got like 10 of these throw around my house. I use it for cool down my balls some time.
  • 9 Hide
    blazorthon , August 17, 2012 6:24 PM
    If they're changing the cooler, why not change it for the better than a change that no matter how much they say it is visual, seems to just be a way to reduce the BOM slightly? Even AMD can make some pretty good stock coolers, but Intel refuses to make anything half-decent.
  • -3 Hide
    Arlen10 , August 17, 2012 6:28 PM
    Goodu
  • 4 Hide
    eddieroolz , August 17, 2012 6:33 PM
    More like returning to the design of Core 2 days. My E7200 came with a boxed cooler that was round, not square.
  • -6 Hide
    razor512 , August 17, 2012 6:49 PM
    The change is made so that people with older CPU's can buy a boxed set instead of the lower cost OEM packaged CPU's and simply use the old intel heatsink.

    With this change, users upgrading their CPU will be forced to buy a new retail package. (more profitable for intel)

    There are many people who use the stock cooler because they have no plans of overclocking.
  • 1 Hide
    freggo , August 17, 2012 7:00 PM
    if there is no improvement or other advantage than what's the point?
    Needed to keep the design department busy ?
  • 8 Hide
    Supernova1138 , August 17, 2012 7:31 PM
    This isn't really news. My i5 760 I got over a year ago had the "new" design. It had the round base rather than square.

    In any case, *yawn* wake me up when they come up with a better mounting solution than the craptacular push pins they have now.
  • 3 Hide
    Vorador2 , August 17, 2012 7:35 PM
    Drat, i was expecting them to license the Sandia CPU Cooler. :( 
Display more comments