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Micron Announces its First DDR4 Module, Production in Q4

By - Source: Micron | B 47 comments

Micron said that it has begun shipping "fully functional" DDR4 memory modules in sample numbers to customers.

DDR4 is expected to be shipping in volume in 2014, but Micron believes that it will enter volume production in the fourth quarter of this year and have the chips ready for applications in early 2013.

The modules were developed in collaboration with Nanya and manufactured as a the 4 Gb DDR4 x8 part in a 30 nm process. When in production, Micron says it will be offering RDIMMs, LRDIMMs, 3DS, SODIMMs and UDIMMs in standard and ECC versions. Initial speeds of the devices will reach 2,400 MT/s and eventually hit 3,200 MT/s.

"With the JEDEC definition for DDR4 very near finalization, we've put significant effort into ensuring that our first DDR4 product is as JEDEC-compatible as it can be at this final stage of its development," said Brian Shirley, vice president for Micron's DRAM Solutions Group, in a prepared statement. "We've provided samples to key partners in the market place with confidence that the die we give them now is the same die we will take into mass production."

Micron's roadmap looks especially interesting in the light of its planned acquisition of Elpida Memory, which could boost its DRAM market share to an estimated 25 percent, according to market research firm IHS. The company could grow into a serious competitor for Samsung, which announced the first DDR4 module in January 2011.

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Top Comments
  • 20 Hide
    vaughn2k , May 8, 2012 11:42 AM
    When Samsung announced the DDR4 launch in 2011, nobody was yet, interested at that time, because the availability of JEDEC standard. Then last month, Samsung was trying to push Intel the release of the DDR4 JEDEC ahead of the 2014 schedule.

    Now Micron is releasing in Q4!

    I love competition, and turning the tides!
  • 19 Hide
    CaedenV , May 8, 2012 1:08 PM
    volks1470I could see a benefit for servers, but i can't see a reason to upgrade for the average desktop user. We're definitely entering "good enough" computing for most all components. Semi-Accurate wrote a great article on this subject. Storage still has much more room for improvement!! Talk about a bottleneck...

    no kidding, we have been in the 'good enough' for home users world for ~5 years now. For browsing the internet, email, HD movies, and light gaming all that you need is a core2duo paired with a $30-50 GPU, and an SSD perks them right up to feeling quite modern. I know that I might kick myself for saying this, but for the moment it really is true: "You do not need more than a duel core processor and 4GB of system ram" for modern computing needs (unless doing high end gaming, heavy video editing, 3D design, or other 'cutting edge' uses).

    All the analysts say that the slowdown in PC sales is due to tablets and smartphones, but the reality is that everyone who is interested in PCs already has one, and instead of needing a new PC every 2-3 years to do basic things like web browsing and movie watching, you now only need a new PC every 5-8 years to do those same things. And the reason for this is exactly because the focus is on getting smaller and smaller devices to do these things. So long as software designers are aiming software at mobile platforms, the desktops can stagnate on hardware innovation without any form of recourse (granted we are still seeing major pushes forward by Intel, AMD, and nVidia). But the fact of the matter is that a C2D is more than 'good enough' for todays needs when paired with fast internet, and cheap GPU, and an SSD... all of which are required for a fast home PC on more modern CPUs anyways (wiht the exception of the GPU now with IB chips).

    @ article:
    looks like we will have DDR4 just in time for Haswell :)  I hope Intel changes their mind and uses the new Ram instead of holding over on DDR3 like they were originally thinking.
    also; 30nm? Arent most current SSDs down to 20nm? It is not like these are anywhere near as complex as a CPU, I would think they would be at least down to ~20nm or less by now... but maybe I am just being picky
  • 17 Hide
    digiex , May 8, 2012 12:48 PM
    This will be the beginning of the end of dirt cheap DDR3 memory.
Other Comments
    Display all 47 comments.
  • 20 Hide
    vaughn2k , May 8, 2012 11:42 AM
    When Samsung announced the DDR4 launch in 2011, nobody was yet, interested at that time, because the availability of JEDEC standard. Then last month, Samsung was trying to push Intel the release of the DDR4 JEDEC ahead of the 2014 schedule.

    Now Micron is releasing in Q4!

    I love competition, and turning the tides!
  • 16 Hide
    jaquith , May 8, 2012 11:54 AM
    Let the nightmare of incompatibility commence!

    I do look forward to the faster speeds and low voltage
    , I just foresee a boat load of initial problems getting DDR4-2400 and faster sets to work properly.
  • 9 Hide
    volks1470 , May 8, 2012 12:25 PM
    I could see a benefit for servers, but i can't see a reason to upgrade for the average desktop user.
    We're definitely entering "good enough" computing for most all components. Semi-Accurate wrote a great article on this subject.
    Storage still has much more room for improvement!! Talk about a bottleneck...
  • 14 Hide
    youssef 2010 , May 8, 2012 12:35 PM
    volks1470I could see a benefit for servers, but i can't see a reason to upgrade for the average desktop user. We're definitely entering "good enough" computing for most all components. Semi-Accurate wrote a great article on this subject. Storage still has much more room for improvement!! Talk about a bottleneck...


    Exactly my thoughts. As TH has proved many times, Ram speeds in excess of 1600MHz return very little gains to be considered worthwhile.

    Still, I'm not going to say no to technology. And who knows what will happen in 2014?
  • 9 Hide
    verbalizer , May 8, 2012 12:36 PM
    @ jaquith
    use the force and the RAM timings/motherboard compatibility will be strong with you..
  • 17 Hide
    digiex , May 8, 2012 12:48 PM
    This will be the beginning of the end of dirt cheap DDR3 memory.
  • -8 Hide
    nebun , May 8, 2012 12:54 PM
    so what are the benefits again?
  • -8 Hide
    daglesj , May 8, 2012 12:57 PM
    Ahhh move forward to 2014 and see masses of guys pointlessly busy trying to lower the CAS settings of these modules in their parents basement in the hope of going from 146FPS to 146.5FPS.

    If only that kind of effort and enthusiasm could be used for good.
  • -2 Hide
    robisinho , May 8, 2012 1:00 PM
    just some hypothesis but: maybe intel was originally supposed to have .. I guess it would be ivy bridge Xeons in 2013 with DDR4 but they realized they wont have them til at least a quarter later (and thus in 2014) -- so announced their expectation for DDR4 in 2014. Obviously I don't mean the E3 budget line (which still might make 2012), but that would be a weird line to introduce DDR4 server memory on.
  • 19 Hide
    CaedenV , May 8, 2012 1:08 PM
    volks1470I could see a benefit for servers, but i can't see a reason to upgrade for the average desktop user. We're definitely entering "good enough" computing for most all components. Semi-Accurate wrote a great article on this subject. Storage still has much more room for improvement!! Talk about a bottleneck...

    no kidding, we have been in the 'good enough' for home users world for ~5 years now. For browsing the internet, email, HD movies, and light gaming all that you need is a core2duo paired with a $30-50 GPU, and an SSD perks them right up to feeling quite modern. I know that I might kick myself for saying this, but for the moment it really is true: "You do not need more than a duel core processor and 4GB of system ram" for modern computing needs (unless doing high end gaming, heavy video editing, 3D design, or other 'cutting edge' uses).

    All the analysts say that the slowdown in PC sales is due to tablets and smartphones, but the reality is that everyone who is interested in PCs already has one, and instead of needing a new PC every 2-3 years to do basic things like web browsing and movie watching, you now only need a new PC every 5-8 years to do those same things. And the reason for this is exactly because the focus is on getting smaller and smaller devices to do these things. So long as software designers are aiming software at mobile platforms, the desktops can stagnate on hardware innovation without any form of recourse (granted we are still seeing major pushes forward by Intel, AMD, and nVidia). But the fact of the matter is that a C2D is more than 'good enough' for todays needs when paired with fast internet, and cheap GPU, and an SSD... all of which are required for a fast home PC on more modern CPUs anyways (wiht the exception of the GPU now with IB chips).

    @ article:
    looks like we will have DDR4 just in time for Haswell :)  I hope Intel changes their mind and uses the new Ram instead of holding over on DDR3 like they were originally thinking.
    also; 30nm? Arent most current SSDs down to 20nm? It is not like these are anywhere near as complex as a CPU, I would think they would be at least down to ~20nm or less by now... but maybe I am just being picky
  • -6 Hide
    matt_b , May 8, 2012 1:16 PM
    I have been curious for some time how the next DDR generation would pan out. Historically, graphic cards have been a generation ahead from desktop/laptop RAM. Since the video card market practically skipped DDR4, I was hoping the rest of the market would as well :) 
  • 14 Hide
    randy87z , May 8, 2012 1:41 PM
    Video cards use DDR3 and GDDR4/5 which are both based off of DDR3. There is a difference between DDR and GDDR. They did not 'skip' DDR4.
  • 1 Hide
    ojas , May 8, 2012 3:11 PM
    john_4Perfect timing. It won't be worth building a new rig until the new kiddie consoles come out anyway and they are pumping out games for them. Sadly PC games are tied to the kiddie consoles since that is where the money is at right now. Until then my Q9650 & GTX560Ti will serve me just fine.

    Yeah i agree, good thing i'm skipping Ivy...though i think DDR4 will be too expensive when Haswell launches. More like in time for Broadwell. Which is also fine, because we'll at least have slightly better console ports then :D 
  • -5 Hide
    jhansonxi , May 8, 2012 3:53 PM
    I'm still using DDR2 but I also insist on ECC after a bad experience with early Crucial BallistiX 8500 modules.
  • 12 Hide
    tiret , May 8, 2012 4:38 PM
    ^ you sir are the bane of Pc gaming
  • 8 Hide
    Tab54o , May 8, 2012 4:55 PM


    BrythespyKiddy Consoles? I'm a full PC gamer, but I'm defending the PS3 because of 1 thing. Give me a link to a build, or set of parts that can play MW3, BF3, ME3 with decent FPS and Graphics, that cost 200$? My 189 dollar 120GB PS3 can play games much better than my 800 something dollar rig. (GTX 550, i5, 4GB, 750GB).


    Uhh Most systems can play that piece of garbage we call MW3. Plus some of those game were ported from console so yeah they run better on a console. Looks better on a PC anyway. Not a very good argument.
  • -9 Hide
    Tab54o , May 8, 2012 4:56 PM
    I dont get why they do this. We already have DDR5. Why not just skip to that. Probably overkill but so what?
  • 8 Hide
    sagansrun , May 8, 2012 5:13 PM
    Quote:
    I'm still using DDR2 but I also insist on ECC after a bad experience with early Crucial BallistiX 8500 modules.


    Why would you use ECC in a desktop environment? Its slower than normal ram and what model MB are you using that supports ECC?
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