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Taking Down The Internet

Security Threat Analysis: Interview With Dino A. Dai Zovi
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Alan: Would you specifically recommend Chrome for Vista and Windows 7 users then?

Dino: If security is your highest priority, I would recommend Chrome for any user on any operating system that it supports. Chrome has leap-frogged the other Web browsers in terms of security due to its innovative multi-process sandbox model. Chrome is even more secure on Windows Vista and Windows 7.

Alan: What browser should we be using on the Mac or Linux?

Dino: If security is your highest priority, I’d recommend using lynx.

Alan: It’s that bad, huh?  What do you use personally on your Mac?

Dino: It depends on which Mac. I run Safari, FireFox, and Chrome within a Vista x64 VM on VMware Fusion. I like Safari's UI and polish so I use that for casual Web browsing because I'd be less concerned if an attacker gained access to my Twitter and Facebook account than my other private personal data. I use FireFox for that more sensitive Web browsing such as financial sites, etc. On my secure development machine, I surf the Web using Chrome within a Vista x64 VM on VMware Fusion. Good data separation takes a little work, but it's not too much to recommend that most users do their online banking from a different machine than the one that their children use to play games on the Web. For that, I'd recommend that users keep an old machine around with a clean install of the operating system that is only turned on when needed and that they patch it before surfing the Web with it.

Alan: That’s a great tip. One last question: in 1998, the members of L0pht testified in front of the US Congress that a committed team of hackers could take down the entire Internet in 30 minutes. Security has certainly improved and the Internet has certainly gotten bigger, but the attackers have gotten more sophisticated too. Do you think that statement still holds today?

Dino: Yes, and I probably shouldn’t say much more about it than that. Unfortunately, the Internet is more fragile than we would like to think and a lot of its core protocols require a redesign with security in mind.

I apologize for the sometimes short and vague answers, but this business often requires a high degree of secrecy in order to protect clients and users.

Alan: I completely understand. Thank you for your time. It was pleasure.

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  • 0 Hide
    cruiseoveride , April 6, 2009 6:30 AM
    Wonder why he didnt mention SELinux
  • 0 Hide
    mrubermonkey , April 6, 2009 8:17 AM
    If it were so easy to "take down the Internet" I am sure Iran or China would have done it by now, but the vagueness of his last answer does add to the mystic of his image.
  • 0 Hide
    AlanDang , April 6, 2009 9:35 AM
    Not really -- the black hats make money off the Internet -- it doesn't help them. By definition though, the risk is always about "taking down" a few IXP's or the +1 nodes.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , April 6, 2009 10:02 AM
    "Selectively granting privileges to enhanced functionality to Web sites is an area where most Web browsers can improve".

    They may not be core functions but everyone I know who is concerned with security on the Internet uses Firefow with the add-ins Noscript & Flashblock.
  • 1 Hide
    vaskodogama , April 6, 2009 10:08 AM
    mrubermonkeyIf it were so easy to "take down the Internet" I am sure Iran or China would have done it by now, but the vagueness of his last answer does add to the mystic of his image.

    I am from Iran, All the Iranian Goverment can do, is blocking porn and politics web sites! :D 
    [We People mostly not believe in the goverment, and ayatollahs, because they are mostly thieves! We Stand on the ground of wealth, and they are teroring us and eat our oil and money! This is a Tech site, so i'm not gonna talk more about this! cheers!]
  • 0 Hide
    pcworm , April 6, 2009 11:14 AM
    I'm also from Iran , come one, we still connect using bloody dial up, you guys cant be serious! although due to the "no copyright" law we can buy Windows, Mathlab, VS 2008 team System,office 2007 and a lot more for less than a dollar each...:-) you dont need broadband here cause piracy is official
  • -2 Hide
    Gutbop , April 6, 2009 11:29 AM
    Dino: I'm a die-hard Unix user and Mac OS X is the most convenient and functional Unix-based operating system that I have ever used. I can code in a traditional Unix environment, watch a DVD, and use Microsoft Office all on the same system. The system JUST WORKS and lets me get my job done.

    Ahahahaha. Really!? Are you kidding me? Did Apple pay you to say that?
  • -9 Hide
    Gutbop , April 6, 2009 11:29 AM
    Dino: I'm a die-hard Unix user and Mac OS X is the most convenient and functional Unix-based operating system that I have ever used. I can code in a traditional Unix environment, watch a DVD, and use Microsoft Office all on the same system. The system JUST WORKS and lets me get my job done.

    Ahahahaha. Really!? Are you kidding me? Did Apple pay you to say that?
  • -8 Hide
    Gutbop , April 6, 2009 11:30 AM
    Dino: I'm a die-hard Unix user and Mac OS X is the most convenient and functional Unix-based operating system that I have ever used. I can code in a traditional Unix environment, watch a DVD, and use Microsoft Office all on the same system. The system JUST WORKS and lets me get my job done.

    Ahahahaha. Really!? Are you kidding me? Did Apple pay you to say that?
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , April 6, 2009 3:17 PM
    I am a Mac user as well. I also use many versions of Windows and Linux in VM. I am not a security expert or anything but why is everyone hung up on someone taking down the internet. Hackers use the net to make money or prove a point. I don't think they are going to shut the net down and hold it hostage, who would be forking over the money anyway. And if they did it to prove a point how would they ever get recognition for the task when all communication stops.
  • 0 Hide
    bounty , April 6, 2009 3:51 PM
    Actually if there was a country that didn't like "the west," and they wanted to disrupt our economy, the internet is the softest target. I don't see North Korea flying over and dropping bombs on our factories. I could see them taking some DNS servers out and making it real hard for those factories to sell anything. And since info flows freely via the net, it's not like you need to use a ton of resources to gain this attack vector, just a few smart people, an internet connection and some time.
  • 0 Hide
    michaelahess , April 6, 2009 4:30 PM
    DNS, the achilles heel of the net....I think I met this guy once, not sure, but a buddy of mine is in the exact same line of business, might have just heard him talking about him though.....the name just sounds so familiar, maybe he wiped my mind before we walked away.....{homer simpson} ummmm, conspiracy theories....
  • -2 Hide
    antiacid , April 6, 2009 8:13 PM
    Honestly, I found this interview short, lacking in detail and depth and strong on the evangelism.

    Sure, you can make a point of saying "we aren't on Apple's payroll" but at the end of the article, it is still a pretty big advertisement to them for no reason. The main point is that the new malwares are not based on OS flaws but on browser flaws, yet you still go out of your way to advertise the security of OSX (even going as far as speculating on tiger leopard features).

    Anyway, if the guy obviously isn't going to comment or answer a question, cut it out of the interview instead of having a longer question than the associated answer...
  • 2 Hide
    AlanDang , April 6, 2009 10:14 PM
    Browser flaws are still tied to the operating system. We bring it up because it's a natural question -- at the end of the day, there must be one computer that these security researchers are using and surprisingly, many security professionals use a Mac on a regular basis.

    By definition, I am a technology evangelist. I want to share with others the benefits of what technology can bring to the table and also what its limitations are. Fundamentally, I think that security is going to be as significant of an issue to a computer enthusiast as "cooling/thermal management" was. The threats are real and increasing. The people who claim that they have never been infected by malware are either ignorant that they have been infected or limiting their online experience by disabling flash, javascript, etc.

    Right and if we edited the comments, readers would start to cry censorship. That is the conversation we had.
  • 1 Hide
    zonezero , April 7, 2009 12:32 AM
    I have worked for several ISP's and we never see a Mac that has anything other than hardware or configuration problems. I do see on a weekly basis people with Windows computers that are infected and some that are regularly infected with the malware of the week.

    I never owned or used a Mac other than those of my customers before my current job where I was forced to use a new iMac with 10.5 installed. While I still don't like the Mac and have more repect for those who use it.

    Computers are a tool and like any tool it can be used for the wrong job or improperly used for the right job. Pick the tool that best suits you and the job you are performing.
  • 0 Hide
    zonezero , April 7, 2009 12:32 AM
    I have worked for several ISP's and we never see a Mac that has anything other than hardware or configuration problems. I do see on a weekly basis people with Windows computers that are infected and some that are regularly infected with the malware of the week.

    I never owned or used a Mac other than those of my customers before my current job where I was forced to use a new iMac with 10.5 installed. While I still don't like the Mac and have more repect for those who use it.

    Computers are a tool and like any tool it can be used for the wrong job or improperly used for the right job. Pick the tool that best suits you and the job you are performing.
  • 0 Hide
    zonezero , April 7, 2009 12:32 AM
    I have worked for several ISP's and we never see a Mac that has anything other than hardware or configuration problems. I do see on a weekly basis people with Windows computers that are infected and some that are regularly infected with the malware of the week.

    I never owned or used a Mac other than those of my customers before my current job where I was forced to use a new iMac with 10.5 installed. While I still don't like the Mac and have more repect for those who use it.

    Computers are a tool and like any tool it can be used for the wrong job or improperly used for the right job. Pick the tool that best suits you and the job you are performing.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , April 7, 2009 5:48 AM
    He's cute. :p 
  • 0 Hide
    dedhorse , April 7, 2009 4:36 PM
    So basically, he uses OSX for web browsing, while all his real work is done on Vista in a VM, which tells you all you need to know about those two operating systems.
  • 1 Hide
    BillLake , April 8, 2009 7:56 PM
    Wow, no matter what is said, people defend or attack the OS based on who made it. Apple or Microsoft are just tools, OS X is only less targeted while even if Vista is more secure it is more targeted. Currently you are safe on a OS X based PC and that is what he said. No one is saying it is more secure, in fact he said and so did Charlie Miller that OS X is less secure but safer.

    If you really want to be safe, why not use a diskless system, boot off a live CD and only use that to surf the web, then the infection can only be in the memory unless you get a virus that attacks the flash prom on the system.
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