USB 3.0 Performance: Two Solutions From Asus And Gigabyte

By now, most enthusiasts are aware of the bold claims concerning the performance potential of USB 3.0 peripherals, but supporting controllers have only recently started dribbling onto the scene. However, fully testing the capabilities of this technology would require some kind of data device that is at least as fast as the fastest controller and such a device does not yet exist (we'd need something capable of pushing more than 500 MB/s).

We probably shouldn’t expect to tickle the upper reaches of what USB 3.0 can do any time soon. After all, it was more than a year after the introduction of “hi-speed” USB 2.0 before devices were able to offer 35 MB/s speeds, which still fell far short of the interface’s rated 480 Mb/s (60 MB/s) specification.

Due to a similar lack of adequately-speedy devices and an even more fantastic-sounding data rate limit, it could be years before we have a chance to push USB 3.0 as far as the interface will go. Yet, the relative scarcity of USB 3.0-enabled peripherals at this point in time doesn’t prevent us from taking a closer look at the way USB 3.0 is being implemented on the latest motherboards. If the results are good, you can be sure we'll see more and more hardware hitting the scene with support for the interface.

Before we examined the “how” of USB 3.0 implementation, we asked ourselves “why?” Wasn’t eSATA good enough? Casual observers could cite the fact that its 5.0 Gb/s interface is potentially faster than the 3.0 Gb/s supported by eSATA, but insightful readers know that eSATA already outpaces consumer-level storage solutions and is due for an update to 6.0 Gb/s soon. Thus, while USB 3.0 is generally promoted as a performance enhancement, its primary raison d’être might be as a solution to eSATA’s problems.

The first problem USB 3.0 solves is that, unlike SATA, it’s not limited to ATA and ATAPI devices. Designed to function like a PCI Express (PCIe) 2.0 external link, combining it with USB 2.0 on a single jack provides connectivity similar to what ExpressCard slots offer with which so many notebook users are familiar. We look forward to seeing it adapted to a similar variety of devices, such as video capture and graphics cards. Borrowing power from the USB 2.0 interface with which it co-exists, USB 3.0 becomes a more convenient solution for portable drives compared to non-powered eSATA. USB 3.0 also specifies higher amperage capacity for the USB 2.0 power pins it shares, making it a better solution for portable storage than even the combination USB 2.0/eSATA connections present on some motherboards and thumb drives.

But perhaps the most important of USB 3.0’s advantages is that, by being designed for removable devices from the beginning, the standard isn’t likely to meet the engineering abuses that have prevented onboard SATA/eSATA controllers on many motherboards from supporting the “Safely Remove Hardware” function of Windows. Thus, while USB 3.0 might be “just another interface” from the storage perspective, improved flexibility makes it an important step away from the eSATA interface against which it competes.

With the question of USB 3.0’s relevance settled, let’s take a closer look at how manufacturers are implementing it.

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    Top Comments
  • Wow, transferring your por..... programs should be a lot faster now.
    21
  • Other Comments
  • Great review. This waiting game sucks.
    1
  • Wow, transferring your por..... programs should be a lot faster now.
    21
  • This seems a bit dated, my two week old ASUS P6X58D Premium has Sata 6.0 and USB 3.0!
    Obviously waiting for a bit more mature drivers and more hardware...
    -2
  • Can't wait for it all to be standard.
    1
  • Pitty they'll only be available at the back for now....but good news nevertheless
    2
  • BAH.... Im waiting for an X58 with USB.3.0 AND 16x 16x SLI. I would not want to sacrifice the other slot for a 8x config....
    0
  • liquidsnake718BAH.... Im waiting for an X58 with USB.3.0 AND 16x 16x SLI. I would not want to sacrifice the other slot for a 8x config....


    Uh, d00d, 1366 CPU has 36 2.0 lanes, don't those X58 boards use the leftover four for USB3 and SATA6? I mean, c'mon, 16+16+4=36
    -2
  • I've been waiting to see how USB 3 performs. However, if you may it's better to test the CPU utilization comparison between all connectors as well. Still, thanks for the great review. b^^d
    2
  • Honestly, with USB 3.0, I don't see any reason at all for eSATA anymore.
    I just want a 80GB Intel x18-m with a USB 3.0 port. Who the hell wants a slow 64GB flash drive?

    I wish we could agree on a stanard already. I like USB, so let's just scrap IDE, SATA, eSATA, PCI (not PCIe), analog audio cables completely already. Well, that or miniDisplayPort.
    -1
  • Thanks for explaining how USB 3.0 fits into the grand scheme of things.
    0
  • Looks like I'll stick to using esata for a while longer. Not too thrilled with the early implimentations.
    1
  • Cant you build 2 computers with the same motherboards, and then run a network through usb 3.0. Run raid in both with ssd, and then fully test bandwidth? That way you are maxing out the spec?
    9
  • I'm With Thackstonns on this one. Would have been nice to have done a more in depth look and used raided SSD's. See if you can max out the interface with enough of them. Is that possible?
    0
  • liquidsnake718 said:
    BAH.... Im waiting for an X58 with USB.3.0 AND 16x 16x SLI. I would not want to sacrifice the other slot for a 8x config....



    ? ? ?

    ASUS P6X58D-Premium has 16x16x8x with USB.3.0 & SATA.6G/s, I have had mine for two weeks and loving it.
    It does tripple LSI or Crossfire.

    Running it with I7-920 and 6gb of Patriot 2000 mhz cl8

    On the Back Panel there is 4 USB2.0 2 USB3.0 (backward compatable) Inside 2 USB2.0 hdr, 6 SATA-3.0 and 2-SATA-6.0 as well as a E-SATA hdr
    -1
  • With having an e-SATA external hard drive, I see no quick need to upgrade to USB3.0, as their is little performance difference. I'm waiting more for the performance increase overall with the SATA-3.0 hard drives, at which point I'll upgrade my motherboard.
    0
  • thackstonnsCant you build 2 computers with the same motherboards, and then run a network through usb 3.0. Run raid in both with ssd, and then fully test bandwidth? That way you are maxing out the spec?


    That would be great if the hardware to connect the two had been available. It's certainly something to look for, now that you've suggested it!

    cah027Would have been nice to have done a more in depth look and used raided SSD's. See if you can max out the interface with enough of them. Is that possible?


    It's possible if you send two SSD's in a 3.5" internal bay adapter that has a built-in RAID controller. Of course, this could be problematic still since the USB 3.0 adapter provides only SATA 3.0 Gb/s (we've also been told that it's limitted to 180MB/s on current firmware). But other than the lack of hardware...
    1
  • Although its good to see the hardware in the wild, I don't yet see any reason to buy something for USB 3.0 and SATA 6GB/s.

    Yes there is some future proofing, but as I think it was mentioned at the beginning of the article, it will be years before we see a significant number of USB 3.0 and SATA 6GB/s devices on the market, and maybe even longer before we see storage with the ability to use all that bandwidth.

    Certainly it will take aeons for traditional hdds to utilize all that speed, but ssd's might be able to do that in a few years, right?
    -1
  • scryer_360Although its good to see the hardware in the wild, I don't yet see any reason to buy something for USB 3.0 and SATA 6GB/s.Yes there is some future proofing, but as I think it was mentioned at the beginning of the article, it will be years before we see a significant number of USB 3.0 and SATA 6GB/s devices on the market, and maybe even longer before we see storage with the ability to use all that bandwidth.Certainly it will take aeons for traditional hdds to utilize all that speed, but ssd's might be able to do that in a few years, right?


    SSD's could probably do that now if they applied 24-way parallelism to the internal controller and the fastest available chips.
    0
  • Sounds good, but on the "Throughput, Streaming, And Interface Performance" page you have a mix up of letters "Regarding write speeds, Gigabyte’s eSATA controller looks a little better while Asus’ USB 3.0 implementation looks a little worse in IOMeter. USB 2.0 performance remains relatively pathetic, so eSATA and UBS 3.0 will both give you a substantial performance boost."
    -1
  • Crap posted before I was done, but anyway the mistake is that you stated it as "UBS 3.0" and not USB 3.0. Tiny error.
    -1