ViewSonic XG2700-4K 27-inch Ultra HD FreeSync Monitor Review

If you're looking for FreeSync, IPS and Ultra HD in one product, choices are slim. ViewSonic has entered this rarified category with a phenomenal effort in the XG2700-4K. This 27-inch monitor is one of the best displays we've ever tested.

To define a gaming monitor, one usually focuses on things like panel response, input lag, adaptive refresh and blur reduction. But whenever we review a display with 1920x1080 pixels, the priority quickly shifts to resolution. It's pretty obvious that most users find QHD (2560x1440) to be the sweet spot. At that point you're seeing fine details without pixilation or jagged lines and you won't need a thousand-dollar video card to drive it at smooth framerates.

But what if you have that mega-buck system? Of course there's nothing like running a QHD monitor at 100fps with G-Sync or FreeSync. Still, there are those who thirst for the greater pixel density of an Ultra HD (3840x2160) panel in their gaming rig.

We've looked at several such products that offer decent image quality and reasonably fast response given their max refresh limit of 60Hz. It's generally accepted that when you're playing below 80-90fps, adaptive refresh becomes almost necessary. Though many people happily lived without it for years, once G-Sync and FreeSync came on the scene, there was no going back.

By putting the video card in charge of a constantly-varying refresh rate, the monitor only draws a frame when instructed to do so. That means an end to tearing artifacts, which can be very distracting, especially when the action drops below 40fps.

So far, we've only seen a tiny handful of Ultra HD screens with adaptive refresh. Last summer we checked out Acer's XB280HK with Nvidia's G-Sync technology and a 28-inch TN panel. Now we have a 27-inch FreeSync screen in the lab for testing: ViewSonic's new XG2700-4K IPS display.

Specifications

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27-inch IPS is a relatively new category among Ultra HD monitors. We've seen plenty of the inexpensive 28-inch TN models and several 32-inch jumbo screens as well. There are even 24-inch panels available though none of them have a gaming focus.

The XG2700-4K is designed and marketed as a gaming product but we were quite surprised upon opening the carton to find a calibration data sheet spec'd for our particular sample. The first thing we did was to research the product's price point and there we received a second surprise. At this writing it sells for around $650 on the street. So is it a professional display or a gaming monitor? The answer is yes on both counts.

Now you won't find a wide-gamut option so technically it doesn't completely qualify. But given the accuracy and performance we discovered in testing, the XG2700-4K is actually better in the sRGB colorspace than most of the dedicated pro screens we've reviewed. In looking at the specs, it says "gaming" more than "color-critical." AMD FreeSync is included, operating over a somewhat narrow range of 40-60Hz. We'd prefer to see a lower limit of 30Hz given the number of pixels in motion. You'll need at least a mid-grade video board to drive it above 40fps. You also get overdrive and low input lag options. The latter removes some processing overhead to help speed up panel response.

But you also get a two-point grayscale editor, a color management system, multiple gamma presets and several picture modes that hit every calibration target without adjustment. Add to that five video inputs and a USB 3.0 hub and you have a monitor that can do just about anything and it costs less than you'd expect for this kind of performance.

Can the XG2700-4K satisfy gamers and graphics pros alike? Let's take a look.

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  • picture_perfect
    Quote:
    tearing artifacts, can be very distracting, especially when the action drops below 40fps


    Nope, again tearing is when FPS > refresh.
    Judder is when FPS < refresh.
    The cause and effect are completely different.
    Basic stuff fellas.
    1
  • chuckydb
    Quote:
    tearing artifacts, can be very distracting, especially when the action drops below 40fps

    And thats why I still have a hard time taking freesync seriously.
    -8
  • Pailin
    Quote:
    Quote:
    tearing artifacts, can be very distracting, especially when the action drops below 40fps


    Nope, again tearing is when FPS > refresh.
    Judder is when FPS < refresh.
    The cause and effect are completely different.
    Basic stuff fellas.


    that was one of the sillier comments I've seen in a while.
    2
  • Shankovich
    If you're getting a FreeSync monitor, you should have built a rig that doesn't dip past 60 for most games...
    1
  • AlistairAB
    LG UD68, 27 inch 4K freesync, with calibrated sRGB mode, $449. Poor LG no one is taking notice, I have it and it is great! No need to spend $650 for the same monitor.
    0
  • hardarse7
    I don't understand why anyone would buy a 4k monitor less than 40" in size. That is four 20" FHD screens. I just bought a Samsung 50" 4k tv to use as a monitor, which is like four 25" FHD screens. It is absolutely brilliant to have so much screen space with no bezels in the middle.
    -1
  • makah
    hardarse7 your eyeballs are going to melt out of your head. like the opening of the ark ceremony
    1
  • envy14tpe
    Why would you use a weak GPU, R9-285, to try to game on 4k? At minimum, a Fury should be used.
    2
  • picture_perfect
    Pailin said:

    that was one of the sillier comments I've seen in a while.


    Well they got it wrong the last 15 reviews, so somebody should say something.
    1
  • loki1944
    I can't understand the appeal of 27 inch 4K; seems small for that rez. 27 inches is good for 1440p surround, but once I have the gpu grunt for 4K surround I'd be more interested in 30-32 in monitors.
    -1
  • JamesSneed
    I'm in the same boat, no thanks on a 27 inch 4k monitor. Its not the monitors fault its simply I don't want to deal with any scaling issues in windows or with non native windows applications. When you have scaling issues on a 27 inch 2K monitor at least you can still read the print. If there were not scaling issues at all I would be there in a heartbeat as the text clarity and visuals are pretty.
    0
  • eklipz330
    Quote:
    I can't understand the appeal of 27 inch 4K; seems small for that rez. 27 inches is good for 1440p surround, but once I have the gpu grunt for 4K surround I'd be more interested in 30-32 in monitors.
    it doesn't need to appeal to you. technology will continue to progress. higher res panels are good for a lot of things.
    1
  • BGA___
    Quote:
    LG UD68, 27 inch 4K freesync, with calibrated sRGB mode, $449. Poor LG no one is taking notice, I have it and it is great! No need to spend $650 for the same monitor.


    Is the LG model IPS?
    0
  • loki1944
    Anonymous said:
    Quote:
    I can't understand the appeal of 27 inch 4K; seems small for that rez. 27 inches is good for 1440p surround, but once I have the gpu grunt for 4K surround I'd be more interested in 30-32 in monitors.
    it doesn't need to appeal to you. technology will continue to progress. higher res panels are good for a lot of things.


    Not for me, it's like having 2560x1440p on an 11 inch screen, too small to notice.
    0
  • zodiacfml
    It seems that the sRGB is becoming an easy target for monitor makers now, nevertheless, it is an awesome product by ViewSonic taking its liberty to calibrate and add freesync in a 4K display for a reasonable price. Yet, instead of calibrating it, they should better put their effort of including a capability to overclock to 75 or 85Hz for future proofing.

    Unfortunately, without a faster refresh rate and for almost the price, a Philips 40" with 4K is only 50 dollars away with bragging right spec of 8000:1 contrast ratio and practically the same sRGB accuracy.
    0