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Virtually There

Win 7's XP Mode And VirtualBox: When You Need Windows XP
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There are a couple of gotchas to be aware of, whether you’re running Windows XP Mode or VirtualBox and a licensed copy of Windows XP.

First, there’s the issue of keeping two different operating systems updated: the host OS and the virtual machine OS. It’s not that big a deal for a handful of users, but multiply it by 50, 100, or more, and you’ve got a support challenge in a business environment.

The second problem is hardware support, including drivers. Standard stuff, like USB memory keys, optical drives, and so on, work fine. But anything exotic could be problematic. We’ve already mentioned the issues with VirtualBox and 3D, for example. We've already seen Parallels enable access to multiple GPUs in a Xeon 5500-series system with Workstation 4.0 Extreme, but this functionality is limited to a handful of HP workstations and not yet available on the desktop.

Given the issues, why would a home or small office want to run something like Windows XP Mode?

One main reason is security. For example, a shared family PC means that the kids are using Web browsers and surfing the wilds of the Internet. Even if you’re running robust anti-virus software and firewalls, it’s all too easy to accidentally download a Trojan or other nasty malware. The solution: encapsulate all the browsers using Windows XP Mode. The user experience will be pretty transparent, and the virtual machine adds another layer of protection.

The other reason is the whole issue of legacy apps. Small businesses often rely on software written on aging applications, whose providers may even be out of business. That leaves them stuck running on hardware that’s obsolete, and parts can sometimes be hard to find. Running XP Mode allows the company to update their hardware, but still run their old apps.

If the main objective is running older apps, then performance won’t really be an issue. Any modern system capable of running Windows 7 will run older apps in Windows XP Mode, and probably run them better than the old hardware. The key pitfall will likely be drivers for custom hardware. We’ve run into problems with new motherboards where the application required data collection through a parallel printer port, and many systems no longer ship with parallel ports. For the most part, however, XP Mode should serve nicely.

VirtualBox is a good fit if the user is fairly sophisticated and wants to run a variety of different operating systems. You can easily run Linux inside of Windows, Windows in Linux, and DOS inside any OS. For everyday users with older apps or wanting an added bit of security, Windows XP Mode is likely to fit the bill. But be aware that you’ll be supporting more than one operating system.

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  • -4 Hide
    abhinav_mall , October 2, 2009 7:23 AM
    Dont we need a licence for XP ?
  • 3 Hide
    coonday , October 2, 2009 7:30 AM
    It could just be me, but all this talk of Windows XP virtualization makes me feel old. My how time flies.
  • 4 Hide
    apache_lives , October 2, 2009 7:42 AM
    Hmmmmmmmmm dual boot or seperate machines will always be better then "virtual" anything - i buy new machines every 2 years and i still have the old ones - i keep the same OS on it and anything that doesnt work on my new one (usually with new os etc) i leave on the old machines, same deal with Windows 98, dos etc - SEPERATE MACHINES
  • 7 Hide
    Vorador2 , October 2, 2009 8:31 AM
    abhinav_mallDont we need a licence for XP ?


    It seems that 7 Business and Ultimate already include the necessary license for XP.

    And btw, dual boot is better.....but newer hardware don't always have drivers for older OS, and when you need to work multiple applications in parallel and share data between them you don't have the time or the leisure to shutdown and reboot in different modes or change between computers. And virtualization has come a long way so the performance penalties for running virtualized OS are minimum.
  • -4 Hide
    bustapr , October 2, 2009 12:57 PM
    So I can't play some of the best xp only games with this ?
    No thanks. I like my xp game collection, which get more graphicky 3d than 2d age of wonders.
  • -1 Hide
    bustapr , October 2, 2009 1:04 PM
    And it looks like xp mode is a mess to set up and maintain. I'll admit xp mode is a nice addition, but not including in W7home premium doesn't sound too good for the people that are getting their upgrade coupon from vista HP to W7 HP. And to constantly update and maintain xp mode and W7 separately would be a bit tiring.
  • -1 Hide
    apache_lives , October 2, 2009 1:24 PM
    bustaprAnd it looks like xp mode is a mess to set up and maintain. I'll admit xp mode is a nice addition, but not including in W7home premium doesn't sound too good for the people that are getting their upgrade coupon from vista HP to W7 HP. And to constantly update and maintain xp mode and W7 separately would be a bit tiring.


    Paying a premium for extra features is normal - nothing new there
  • 1 Hide
    psouza4 , October 2, 2009 1:25 PM
    What games don't run on 7 that only run on XP, bustapr? I'm sure there are a few, but the vast majority run just fine. I imagine the ones that don't *are* really old and would run virtualized just fine. And that's the point.
  • -3 Hide
    denroy33 , October 2, 2009 1:39 PM
    Just dual boot.
  • 3 Hide
    hellwig , October 2, 2009 2:06 PM
    Quote:
    Because of these issues, VirtualBox is a great solution for power users, but probably not a good fit for non-technical PC users in a standard office environment.

    Why is it ok for employees to be idiots? If you have to shield the fact that they are running a Win XP app, maybe they shouldn't be allowed access to the computer system.

    Quote:
    One main reason is security. For example, a shared family PC means that the kids are using Web browsers and surfing the wilds of the Internet. Even if you’re running robust anti-virus software and firewalls, it’s all too easy to accidentally download a Trojan or other nasty malware. The solution: encapsulate all the
    browsers using Windows XP Mode. The user experience will be pretty transparent, and the virtual machine adds another layer of protection.


    Are you sure about this? With the Windows integration, files downloaded in XP mode are stored in the Win7 system, right? This means if you download a trojan, it gets stored on your main OS with everything else, right? I don't think that's more secure. Regular virtual machiens are secure because they are entirely encapsulated, if you download a virus, you wipe the virtual image and its gone. With XP mode, you download a virus, it infects your primary OS, not the XP-Mode OS, unless I misread something.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , October 2, 2009 2:14 PM
    The article says: "While Vista has been successful as an OS for consumers (begrudgingly, you might say)..." well the fact is that the consumer had no choice but to use M$ Vista, they only find Computers with this OS installed. Only a very small percent of PC-expert users could find a way to get a new computer with MS Windows XP on it, at an extra cost. So, i think that everyone can say 'begrudgingly'
  • -5 Hide
    evongugg , October 2, 2009 2:22 PM
    Nice to be able to visit a site and not be infected.
  • 1 Hide
    eyemaster , October 2, 2009 2:59 PM
    apache_livesHmmmmmmmmm dual boot or seperate machines will always be better then "virtual" anything - i buy new machines every 2 years and i still have the old ones - i keep the same OS on it and anything that doesnt work on my new one (usually with new os etc) i leave on the old machines, same deal with Windows 98, dos etc - SEPERATE MACHINES


    Yes, great for you, but for large businesses, it's useless to keep old hardware. Once out of warranty, it's out of the building and in with the new. Virtualization has been in demand for a long time, and now it's finally ready for prime time.
  • -4 Hide
    Anonymous , October 2, 2009 3:16 PM
    You think it's advised to run Windows 7, 64 bit on netbooks?

    I'd say MS was to do good if they released a 32 bit Win7 for netbooks tablets, and other small devices, and started focusing on 64 bit Windows 7 for desktops...
    Although I wonder if we really need 64 bit windows 7.
    At this point, one of the only major downfalls and limitations of 32bit is the amount of RAM for business use that make use of advanced and complicated programs using a lot of ram.
    Downfalls of the 64bit environment is that it works slower on the same hardware, or needs hardware with higher specs to do the same job.

    In most cases, a regular home user can do just fine with 3GB of RAM, as they would with 12GB, only now with less heat generation and powerdraw.

    But even for those wanting to set up a server, or running heavy applications, 40 bit windows would give us more RAM than we'll most likely need in the coming 5 years!
    Basically having a 32bit system with the remaining 8 bit to allocate more ram,and implement safety feats like DEP or something, would be more than sufficient.

    Netbooks,MIDs, and other small devices often use processors with lower than 1Ghz processing power (except the Atom line) and often equal to, or lower than 1GB of ram.
    These devices would benefit running on 16 bit, or 32 over 64 bit.

    You ask me,and I'd say there's little of interest to find in 64 bit computing over 40 bit computing.
    And for the majority (that's like 95%) of the computer users, they won't need anything bigger than 32 bit.
  • -2 Hide
    gto127 , October 2, 2009 3:26 PM
    I preordered the 64 bit of win 7. Does this mean I can't play games such as quake4,doom3 or crysis?
  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , October 2, 2009 3:27 PM
    Concerning the RAM and passwords in XP, I think it might be better to install a regular Win XP OEM version within virtualPC on windows 7.

    That way you don't need to pay for the premium or professional version, and still enjoy the same benefits.
  • 0 Hide
    Aerobernardo , October 2, 2009 3:33 PM
    No old games for Xp? First they come up with DRM, now this? The IT industry must be aware that we have piracy on our side.

    You better behave Microsoft! I want to play my older games, whether you let me or I have to get an ilegal copy for it
  • -2 Hide
    evongugg , October 2, 2009 5:58 PM
    evonguggNice to be able to visit a site and not afraid of being infected.

  • -2 Hide
    chechak , October 2, 2009 7:05 PM
    no hardware-accelerated 3D in Windows XP mode,nooooo ...caome one
  • -1 Hide
    belardo , October 2, 2009 7:51 PM
    64bit is what breaks XP software... right?

    Considering that Windows7 DOESN'T have the memory demands of Vista, then the business sector can just install 32bit Win7 on 2GB computers and it'll run fine. Virtualization may require more memory, so perhaps 4GB and still run a 32bit OS.... but its not needed if older software works fine in 32bit mode.

    I've never seen a "fast" vista box... even the most BASIC $300~400 PCs have 3GB of RAM installed, some with Vista Basic. I've compared side-by-side, a faster (hardware) notebook with 3GB / VistaBasic next to my older ThinkPad with Windows7 Ultimate (RC) with 1GB. My Thinkpad boots faster, shuts down faster (and actually shuts down), open programs faster, copies files much faster... does everything better. Uses far less system resources (process) and memory

    Good to have XP-Mode included, but I don't think it'll be as important as it is for Vista.
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