Titan Army P27A2R 180 Hz gaming monitor review: No frills value and performance

27-inch QHD IPS panel with 180 Hz, Adaptive-Sync, wide gamut color and a very low price.

Titan Army PA27A2R
(Image: © Tom's Hardware)

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Given my frustration with the P27A2R’s OSD control, I’m happy to say that you don’t need to calibrate it. It comes out of the box with solid grayscale, gamma and color tracking.

Grayscale and Gamma Tracking

Our grayscale and gamma tests use Calman calibration software from Portrait Displays. We describe our grayscale and gamma tests in detail here.

There’s not much to see here other than a solid effort from Titan Army. Only the 100% brightness step cracks 3dE, and not by much. At peak output, you might see a touch of warmth if you look very hard, but realistically, this is a visually perfect chart. Gamma tracks the reference line almost exactly. With calibration, only a couple of clicks, I got the error down below 1dE average with no change in gamma. This is reference-level performance.

Comparisons

The P27A2R is on par with the other screens in both default and calibrated states. With a 1.57dE out-of-box result, there is no need for adjustment. That is true for the other monitors, too. While Titan Army delivers excellent accuracy for a low price, it isn’t alone. Though its final score puts it in last place, there is no one who will be unhappy about a 0.86dE grayscale error. That’s about as good as it gets.

Gamma tracking is excellent, with a tight 0.09 range of values and only 0.45% deviation from 2.2. The actual value is 2.21, visually indistinguishable from perfect.

Color Gamut Accuracy

Our color gamut and volume testing use Portrait Displays’ Calman software. For details on our color gamut testing and volume calculations, click here.

I might complain about the P27A2R’s lack of an sRGB mode, but when you look at its color gamut test result, you can’t help but be impressed. Only a slight under-saturation in red and green holds it back from perfection. Calibration lowers the number a bit, but visually, there is no difference. It looks great in all respects.

Comparisons

The P27A2R would win the gamut accuracy contest right out of the box. It’s hard to say much more than, this is a very accurate monitor, for $200. Definitely impressive. Though it doesn’t win the gamut volume comparison, it’s extremely close to the top. Visually, it’s equal to the Cooler Master and MSI displays.

Test Takeaway: The P27A2R’s frustrating OSD is offset by its superb color accuracy. It doesn’t need calibration and it hits all the marks for grayscale, gamma and color in the DCI-P3 realm. Only its lack of an sRGB mode holds it back from maximum greatness. For the money, there is nothing better.

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Christian Eberle
Contributing Editor

Christian Eberle is a Contributing Editor for Tom's Hardware US. He's a veteran reviewer of A/V equipment, specializing in monitors. Christian began his obsession with tech when he built his first PC in 1991, a 286 running DOS 3.0 at a blazing 12MHz. In 2006, he undertook training from the Imaging Science Foundation in video calibration and testing and thus started a passion for precise imaging that persists to this day. He is also a professional musician with a degree from the New England Conservatory as a classical bassoonist which he used to good effect as a performer with the West Point Army Band from 1987 to 2013. He enjoys watching movies and listening to high-end audio in his custom-built home theater and can be seen riding trails near his home on a race-ready ICE VTX recumbent trike. Christian enjoys the endless summer in Florida where he lives with his wife and Chihuahua and plays with orchestras around the state.

  • cknobman
    Thank you for reviewing something closer to the price range regular shoppers are looking at.
    I mean looks pretty darn decent for only $200.
    Reply