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Acer Doubles C7 Chromebook's RAM, Updates HDD, More

SlashGear points out that Acer has "quietly" upgraded its C7 Chromebook to a $299.99 premium model, boosting the notebook's list of specs as well as its pricetag. New to this second installment is a larger hard drive, a larger battery, and double the RAM while still keeping the cost relatively low.

According to the new list of specs, the Acer Chromebook still sports an Intel Celeron 847 dual-core CPU clocked at 1.10 Ghz, 2 MB of cache, and the Intel NM70 Express chipset. The size of the notebook's CineCrystal LED-backlit screen is also still the same, measuring 11.6-inches and packing a 1366 x 768 resolution – Intel HD Graphics is the GPU of choice.

As previously stated, the big jump on the spec list is the Chromebook's local storage capacity, increased from 320 GB to 500 GB (5400 RPM HDD). Given that this notebook is heavily reliant on the cloud, both Google and Acer are pushing users to store their data online despite the HDD upgrade, offering an additional 100 GB free for the first two years of the Chromebook's ownership.

As for the other improvements, the 2 GB of DDR3 SDRAM has been increased to 4 GB. The Chromebook's battery has also doubled in capacity, moving up from a 2,500 mAh li-ion pack promising 3.5 hours of runtime to a 6-cell 5,000 mAh li-ion pack with an estimated 6 hours runtime.

In addition to the upgrades, Acer's revamped C7 Chromebook features a 2-in-1 card reader, 802.11 a/b/g/n and 10/100 Ethernet network connectivity, three USB ports, an HDMI port and a VGA port. There's also an HD webcam, a multi-gesture touchpad and Google's Chrome OS keyboard, but there is no optical drive installed for reading and writing to CDs and DVDs.

"Start in seconds and have that new computer feeling -- every time. Chromebook's cloud-based Chrome OS and built-in virus protection refresh on reboot," Acer states. "No updates to track, no discs to insert, and backups are automatic, too. Unlike other computers, Chromebooks get better with age. Plus, Chrome OS's intuitive interface makes it all so simple."

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  • halcyon
    Not bad...not bad at all.
    Reply
  • MasterMace
    Here's the thing: people don't trust companies with their info. Chromebook gives the companies EVERYTHING, and puts people at the mercy of internet providers.

    Not interested.
    Reply
  • tpi2007
    This is actually quite a good Netbook... to install Windows. Sorry, it really is, with the RAM upgrade, and especially the HDD upgrade, it really seems they are almost hoping people give these a consideration because they can install Windows on it, and maybe, just maybe, try Chrome OS before and see if they like it.
    Reply
  • halcyon
    MasterMaceHere's the thing: people don't trust companies with their info. Chromebook gives the companies EVERYTHING, and puts people at the mercy of internet providers.Not interested.You connect to the internet? You do? You're already providing the ISPs with everything.
    Reply
  • victorintelr
    tpi2007This is actually quite a good Netbook... to install Windows. Sorry, it really is, with the RAM upgrade, and especially the HDD upgrade, it really seems they are almost hoping people give these a consideration because they can install Windows on it, and maybe, just maybe, try Chrome OS before and see if they like it.
    I've tried it in best buy. The google guy told me that it was the second day without plugging it to the wall (it was a samsung, though), what I noticed was that he would show it and then immediately close the lid so it would sleep. Chrome is good for somebody that will check emails and navigate the internet for a while to check some simple stuff. forget about doing too much. I would rather have a tablet and add a keyboard, personally. It is interesting, but looks more limited than android. Only the old people were buying it.
    Reply
  • twisted politiks
    halcyonYou connect to the internet? You do? You're already providing the ISPs with everything.
    Connecting to the internet does not provide your ISP with any sensitive data that is stored on your local drive and not being sent over the internet...
    Reply
  • victorintelr
    halcyonYou connect to the internet? You do? You're already providing the ISPs with everything.I think he means google.
    Reply
  • victorintelr
    Chromebook's cloud-based Chrome OS and built-in virus protection refresh on reboot,"
    wasn't there an article that the google android antimalware was like 15% detection rate?

    Unlike other computers, Chromebooks get better with age. Plus, Chrome OS's intuitive interface makes it all so simple."

    It'd better get better with age, otherwise if bugs are not resolved and performance improved no one will adopt it!
    And the interface is very simple, for there is not much to do, though I don't know how many apps does google have that can run in this OS
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    halcyonYou connect to the internet? You do? You're already providing the ISPs with everything.I think Mace's comment has more to do with how cloud-centric applications/OS tend to store every trivial thing online and become severely crippled without internet connectivity than the ISP benefiting from some new information to leverage. App writers/publishers though do get privileged access to tons of information and I can see why people may be worried about that - I'm not particularly comfortable with the amount of personal info my Nexus7 contains, even less so considering that nearly every app "require" tons of permissions that have no apparent justification, likely due to the advertisement toolkit(s).

    Before cloud-centric devices, devices focused on facilitating access to LAN-based storage and other devices but now, everyone is pushing towards online/cloud storage by making that easier to access than LAN. You want to transfer a file between two cloud-based devices, the files sync over the cloud instead of directly over the LAN. This could hurt quite a bit if (more) ISPs start implementing caps, in which case the issue is the amount of data transferred rather than its nature.

    Cloud-based everything sounds nice in principle but it is also scary in many ways.
    Reply
  • kellybean
    This would make an excellent Linux laptop, have to look into it.
    Reply