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Intel Reveals Hardware Specs List for Windows 8 Tablets

CNET reports that Intel sported a list of specs for a Windows 8 tablet during IDF 2012 Beijing. It included a dual-core Atom Z2760 "Clover Trail" SoC capable of "burst mode" which provides quick bursts of performance when needed. The SoC will also feature HyperThreading which will allow the dual-core SoC to handle four threads.

Based on the spec list, Intel is seemingly trying to set a standard hardware set definition much like it did with the Ultrabook form factor. Except here Intel is pushing for two tablet sizes: one measuring 10-inches, and another containing a 11-inch screen and a physical keyboard.

On a basic level, the tablets will feature 9+ hours of battery life, 3G/4G connectivity, connected standby mode, a thickness of less than 9-mm and a weight of less than 1.5 pounds. A full battery charge should also last around 30 days if the tablet remains in standby mode.

On the entertainment and gaming front, the tablets will support Intel Wireless Display, Advanced Imaging, Intel Insider, Compute Continuum, Wi Fi Direct and NFC technology. On the business front, it will have backward app compatibility, domain join, encryption and security and manageability features.

Tablets based on Intel's spec list are expected to ship with the sparkly new Windows 8 once the OS goes retail later this year. The trick for manufacturers will be how to stand out against the competition using the same list of specs. Yet if they can do it with Ultrabooks, they can do it with tablets. As CNET states, "Intel is pretty adept at getting its satellite of customers and partners to make things happen."

  • bigdragon
    I'm a digital artist and developer on the go. I don't like Intel's specs at all. I really hope manufacturers buck Intel's desired definition of what a tablet should be and bring us more devices like the Asus EP121. Of all the tablets I have used that has been my favorite. The Atom-based tablets have been miserable failures. They're simply too slow to get any real work done with them.

    I want to buy a 10 to 13 inch tablet with a Wacom digitizer and a CPU that is at least twice as strong as an Atom. The only thing at this point that would make the EP121 better is if it had AMD or Nvidia graphics inside. I'm sure Intel doesn't want anyone building the device I want to buy because it would eat into Ultrabook sales. What a shame.
    Reply
  • jimmysmitty
    bigdragonI'm a digital artist and developer on the go. I don't like Intel's specs at all. I really hope manufacturers buck Intel's desired definition of what a tablet should be and bring us more devices like the Asus EP121. Of all the tablets I have used that has been my favorite. The Atom-based tablets have been miserable failures. They're simply too slow to get any real work done with them.I want to buy a 10 to 13 inch tablet with a Wacom digitizer and a CPU that is at least twice as strong as an Atom. The only thing at this point that would make the EP121 better is if it had AMD or Nvidia graphics inside. I'm sure Intel doesn't want anyone building the device I want to buy because it would eat into Ultrabook sales. What a shame.
    Exactally how many Atom based tablets have you had your hands on again? Last I checked there have only been a few released all with Windows 7. The tablet you are talking about has a mobile CPU in it and gets about 3 hours of battery life. Its nice for the better performance, but whats the point if you have to stop and charge it so soon?

    The specs look like a normal tablet to me and 9+ hours of battery life is great for a full dual core.

    From the info on Intels smartphone Atom, it is a better performer than the chip in the Samsung Galaxy S II, and its a single core vs a dual core while giving the same battery life.

    I say wait till this is actually out instead of pre-judging. I think Intel could bring some fierce competition so that the ARM based manufactures start pushing out reall powerfull chips instead of a handful of weak ones. Especially considering Intels process advantage.
    Reply
  • DjEaZy
    ... it is down hill from here for MS and Intel... c'mon... if i wanna a tablet, i buy android or iOS ones... MS and Intel stick to what you do best... i don't say, that they don't need to explore the opportunities... but... don't try to shove down the troat half backed things, because iOS ans android is popular...
    Reply
  • bigdragon, you don't know what you are talking about. There aren't any Intel tablets out there. The device you are talking about weighs a ton for a tablet (1.2 kg), has a mobile i5 in it, and only 4 hours of battery life. That device is less mobile than an ultrabook!!! It is also less powerful than the ultrabooks that will be released in a month. The price tag of $1300 isn't exactly nice either.

    These are TRUE tablets that weight ounces, have 10 hours of battery life, and are smaller. For your applications, the ASUS tablet (if you want to call it that) is perfect! The tablets that you are looking at here are not extremely powerful. They ARE more powerful than the tablets you are seeing out there now. This is a dual core version of a single core processor that has already proven to be more powerful than the ARM CPs out there right now. They also have similar battery life and will run a full version of Win8, not just the metro ARM Win 8. These will be good products for on the go people, just not for someone who needs to do the things you are doing.

    Oh yeah, it won't run Crisis.
    Reply
  • kcorp2003
    why would they sell a 10inch and 11inch model? wouldn't it be better if they go 8inch and 11inch?
    Reply
  • bigdragon
    jimmysmittyExactally how many Atom based tablets have you had your hands on again? Last I checked there have only been a few released all with Windows 7. The tablet you are talking about has a mobile CPU in it and gets about 3 hours of battery life. Its nice for the better performance, but whats the point if you have to stop and charge it so soon?The specs look like a normal tablet to me and 9+ hours of battery life is great for a full dual core.From the info on Intels smartphone Atom, it is a better performer than the chip in the Samsung Galaxy S II, and its a single core vs a dual core while giving the same battery life.I say wait till this is actually out instead of pre-judging. I think Intel could bring some fierce competition so that the ARM based manufactures start pushing out reall powerfull chips instead of a handful of weak ones. Especially considering Intels process advantage.How many tablets? Many. Fujitsu Q550, HP Slate, Lenovo S10, and a couple more. I have to evaluate these things for their applicability for the work environment given the current tablet fad. I was quite fond of the Samsung Series 7, but its reduced screen resolution vs the Asus EP121 was a real downer. When you look at it objectively the mobile i5 reduced battery life is an acceptable tradeoff against the Atom for dramatically higher performance, more screen resolution, and a digitizer that doesn't lag. 3 hours is pretty good compared to the stuff we used to have that got 1 or 1.5 hours. I'm really not all that concerned that an EP121 doesn't stay powered as long as a Kindle. It's good enough. At least I don't have to wait 5 seconds for the junky Atom-based Q550 and its digitizer to decide how to draw the line I just drew.

    I'm not going to comment on phones and ARM and such. My goal is to raise an alarm bell that Intel wants to dumb down Windows 8 tablets into an arena dominated by the iPad and Android tabs. I want a powerful tablet for drawing, sculpting, and even scripting on the go. I want to use it for business and pleasure. Intel and Microsoft seem to want to position their tablets for media consumption. I can browse Facebook just fine on my phone and watch movies just fine on my Smart TV. Let's not forget about the high-end tablet niche the EP121 has dominated over the past year. I want to see a Windows 8 replacement. This article tells me we may not see such a thing because it competes with the Ultrabook.
    Reply
  • husker
    bigdragonI'm a digital artist and developer on the go. I don't like Intel's specs at all. I really hope manufacturers buck Intel's desired definition of what a tablet should be and bring us more devices like the Asus EP121. Of all the tablets I have used that has been my favorite. The Atom-based tablets have been miserable failures. They're simply too slow to get any real work done with them.You are not the target consumer for this device. If you are looking for a device for use in developing content on a professional level, then for the sake of your customers please use a dedicated PC or laptop.
    Reply
  • Zingam_Duo
    bigdragonI'm a digital artist and developer on the go. I don't like Intel's specs at all. I really hope manufacturers buck Intel's desired definition of what a tablet should be and bring us more devices like the Asus EP121. Of all the tablets I have used that has been my favorite. The Atom-based tablets have been miserable failures. They're simply too slow to get any real work done with them.I want to buy a 10 to 13 inch tablet with a Wacom digitizer and a CPU that is at least twice as strong as an Atom. The only thing at this point that would make the EP121 better is if it had AMD or Nvidia graphics inside. I'm sure Intel doesn't want anyone building the device I want to buy because it would eat into Ultrabook sales. What a shame.
    Dude, you have just described a desktop PC with a Core i7 and 16Gb RAM. Go get one! You are totally missing the point. These devices are for entertainment mostly: sit on the couch, browse the web, stream some porn.
    That's why they need to be cheap, thin, small, light and with a very long battery life.

    Yeah, maybe you want a discrete graphics card too and to play Crysis :D
    Reply
  • bigdragon
    MeinKompfbigdragon, you don't know what you are talking about. There aren't any Intel tablets out there.Last time I checked the Motion Computing LE1700 I used to use and Asus EP121 I use now both had Intel logos on there. The LE1700 is from 2007, can be viewed in direct sunlight, has a C2D L7400 that smokes the Atom provided in the 2011 Fujitsu Q550, but only gets an hour of battery life unfortunately. I have been using tablets since before the iPad. The iPad, its form factor, and its purpose is not the be-all and end-all of tablet computing.

    I don't want an iPad and I don't want an Ultrabook. I can't do real work on an iPad, and I can't draw on the screen of an Ultrabook. It disturbs me that Intel wants to define what a Windows 8 tablet is to be such that it doesn't compete with Ultrabooks. This same sort of behavior torpedoed the netbook market. People can do so much more with these types of devices. Let's not use another spec list to constrain them to existing in an over-saturated market dominated by iOS and Android. I don't think this is a recipe for success.
    Reply
  • Zingam_Duo
    pleasure. Intel and Microsoft seem to want to position their tablets for media consumption. I can browse Facebook just fine on my phone and watch movies just fine on my Smart TV. Let's not forget about the high-end tablet niche the EP121 has dominated over the past year. I want to see a Windows 8 replacement. This article tells me we may not see such a thing because it competes with the Ultrabook.
    Yeah, and I want a car with rocket engines to travel to the Moon for the weekend. But fucking Toyota keeps on making hybrids instead of developing the rocket car. Something tell me that we may not see such a thing because it competes with the hybrids.

    Slates like the Asus have been on the market for many years and failed to gain any significant market share. Can you guess why? The Asus is not a tablet it is basically a laptop PC without a keyboard. ;) Too big, too heavy and too underpowered for anything serious, except if you really need something like that. Most people obviously don't. It it was 3x cheaper I might buy one but not at this price and just 4 hours of battery life... no thanks!

    Reply