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EKWB Launches Gigabyte GTX 980 Ti WindForce 3X Full-Cover Water Block

EK Water Blocks announced the availability of the EK-FC980 GTX TI WF3 water block, engineered specifically for Gigabyte GeForce GTX 980 Ti WindForce 3X graphics cards.

The EK-FC980 GTX TI WF3 block is a full cover design, and it covers the entirety of the PCB. It offers cooling for the VRMs and memory chips, along with the GPU itself. EKWB said that water flows over all three of these critical areas, so none of these components are left to be passively cooled, which the company said will help keep the voltage regulators remain stable under high overclocks.

EKWB has been using a central inlet split-flow design recently. The company said this design is unique to EKWB and offers what it considers the best cooling performance possible. The split-flow inlet allows for reversed loop direction, and the ability to use weaker pumps without adverse effect.

As has been typical of EKWB branded blocks for some time, the EK-FC980 GTX TI WF3 will be available in multiple varieties. The company is not currently offering a bare copper option, but the blocks are available with nickel plated copper with the option of a clear acrylic top, or a black POM Acetal top.

Both variants are available now from the EK Webshop for $128.99. Back plates are also being offered, with a black one priced at $34.49 and a nickel plated option for $43.99.

Follow Kevin Carbotte @pumcypuhoy. Follow us @tomshardware, on Facebook and on Google+.

 Kevin Carbotte is a contributing writer for Tom's Hardware who primarily covers VR and AR hardware. He has been writing for us for more than four years. 

  • GoldKingCobra
    Why the hell did they make a block for a card with a huge aftermarket cooler, get a reference and put a block on that...
    Reply
  • photonboy
    The reason to choose a non-reference card is due to the extra effort put into VRM and other features which make overclocking better than a reference design.
    Reply
  • kcarbotte
    16622121 said:
    Why the hell did they make a block for a card with a huge aftermarket cooler, get a reference and put a block on that...

    custom PCB cards often have advanced features more suitable for overclocking like improved chokes and power phases, and in the gase of Gigabyte, more copper in the PCB which should allower for better power delivery.
    Reply
  • GoldKingCobra
    I don't get how an extra $150 justifies a 1 or 2 extra "fps'es."
    Reply
  • kcarbotte
    16629488 said:
    I don't get how an extra $150 justifies a 1 or 2 extra "fps'es."

    It's not about 1 or 2 extra frames, its about the looks, and the experience of doing it.
    Reply
  • photonboy
    16629588 said:
    16629488 said:
    I don't get how an extra $150 justifies a 1 or 2 extra "fps'es."

    It's not about 1 or 2 extra frames, its about the looks, and the experience of doing it.

    1) First of all, it's not just an extra 2FPS because there are times when the air-cooled card starts throttling down depending on the game chosen and case cooling etc.

    DX12 is going to stress the GPU a lot more at times for this; if that doesn't make sense then look it up or just run FURMARK to see what using all of the processing areas of your GPU can do in terms of heat and noise.

    2) It's also about NOISE reduction, the LIFE of the card and also eliminating heat from inside the case which is problematic for SLI or small case designs.

    When a GPU is maxing out about 50degC instead of close to 90degC that's going to make a huge difference in the life of the GPU. In some cases it might mean EIGHT years instead of THREE but the silicon lottery and other factors all contribute to MTBF so it's hard to predict.

    For me, it's primarily about NOISE reduction.

    *It's worth checking out Jayz2cents on the EVGA 980Ti Hybrid:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtRqmzRMar8
    Reply
  • GoldKingCobra
    16636903 said:
    16629588 said:
    16629488 said:
    I don't get how an extra $150 justifies a 1 or 2 extra "fps'es."

    It's not about 1 or 2 extra frames, its about the looks, and the experience of doing it.

    1) First of all, it's not just an extra 2FPS because there are times when the air-cooled card starts throttling down depending on the game chosen and case cooling etc.

    DX12 is going to stress the GPU a lot more at times for this; if that doesn't make sense then look it up or just run FURMARK to see what using all of the processing areas of your GPU can do in terms of heat and noise.

    2) It's also about NOISE reduction, the LIFE of the card and also eliminating heat from inside the case which is problematic for SLI or small case designs.

    When a GPU is maxing out about 50degC instead of close to 90degC that's going to make a huge difference in the life of the GPU. In some cases it might mean EIGHT years instead of THREE but the silicon lottery and other factors all contribute to MTBF so it's hard to predict.

    For me, it's primarily about NOISE reduction.

    *It's worth checking out Jayz2cents on the EVGA 980Ti Hybrid:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtRqmzRMar8

    Might as well get a reference card then...
    Reply