Geil Unveils DDR5 Memory Modules with Tiny Fans

GeIL
(Image credit: GeIL)

Active memory module cooling brings rather mediocre advantages, yet it has been used in one form or another for a couple of decades now. But Geil decided to bring active memory module cooling to a whole new level with its Evo V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory that comes with two miniature fans mounted to each module. 

The key selling point of the Evo V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory is of course its cooling system. The modules come with titanium grey or glacier white heat spreaders that are equipped with two miniature fans that are designed to cool down DRAMs as well as on-module power management IC (PMIC) and voltage regulating module (VRM). Conventional memory chips do not tend to get very hot, but DDR5's PMICs and VRMs generate a lot of heat, so it may indeed make sense to cool them down actively. Meanwhile, it is unclear how much noise do these fans produce. 

Officially, the dual-fan cooling heatsinks can enable approximately 45% more thermal dissipation than traditional heat spreaders. Meanwhile, it remains to be seen how effective Geil's dual-fan heat spreaders will be as far as overclocking is concerned in real-world use cases, but as an added bonus the fans and the heat spreaders have addressable RGB lights that will at least add style to a PC. The RGB LEDs can be controlled using Asus Aura Sync, ASRock Polychrome, Gigabyte GB Fusion 2.0, and MSI Mystic Light software. 

Geil

(Image credit: GeIL)

Geil's Evo V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory modules come in 16GB and 32GB capacity (and therefore come in 32GB and 64GB dual-channel memory kits), speed bins starting at DDR4-4800 and all the way to DDR4-6600 with CL34 ~ CL40 timings as well as 1.1V ~ 1.35V voltage.  

Since Geil's Evo V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory modules feature speed bins that by far exceed those set for chips by DRAM manufacturers, Geil use cherry-picked ICs and like all enthusiast-grade memory modules, these sticks come with XMP 3.0 profiles to easily set high data transfer rates, aggressive latencies, and appropriate voltages. 

GeIL

(Image credit: GeIL)

Interestingly, Geil does not disclose whether it tested its Evo V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory only on Intel's current Alder Lake-based 600-series platforms or also on AMD's upcoming Raphael AM5 platform too, but at least it does not explicitly say that the memory sticks are designed solely for Intel's Z690-based motherboards.

Its not certain as to when Geil's Evo V DDR5 RGB Hardcore Gaming Memory modules and kits will be available. Prices are unknown, though expect the manufacturer to charge a premium for speed bins, advanced cooling, and fancy looks.

Anton Shilov
Freelance News Writer

Anton Shilov is a Freelance News Writer at Tom’s Hardware US. Over the past couple of decades, he has covered everything from CPUs and GPUs to supercomputers and from modern process technologies and latest fab tools to high-tech industry trends.

  • gg83
    We seem to be wasting a lot of energy for the high performing pc components. Fans on everything! Fans will need cooling fans soon.
    Reply
  • alceryes
    Another device capable of breaking on my gaming rig, GREAT!
    :rolleyes:

    Here's an idea, how about putting on a better heatsink with better TIM???
    Reply
  • King_V
    This seems, uh, well, that's a thing now.

    Ugh.

    Doesn't really seem to have a point.
    Reply
  • thisisaname
    tiny fans are going to need to spin fast and fast spinning fans are noisy.

    Would be better as alceryes says an put a better heatsink (with TIM). If the case has good air flow then cooling is not a problem.
    Reply
  • tennis2
    Had to know so I scaled this. Allowing for some extension of the fan blades into the housing, these are 20mm fans.

    Just....why.
    Reply
  • hotaru251
    how about just doing vapro chambers for ram? least they don't wear out like fans ;/
    Reply
  • tennis2
    hotaru251 said:
    how about just doing vapro chambers for ram? least they don't wear out like fans ;/
    A fan dissipates heat off the component through the air (convection). A vapor "chamber" is a large volume of water used to move heat from one place to another (a heatpipe is a vapor chamber also). Vapor chambers are part of a passive cooling solution. They can more efficiently utilize/engage a thermal mass (heatsink), but they still fall within the thermal capability of the heatsink size/design and its ability to passively radiate heat.

    For small elements like sticks of RAM, a heatpipe is really the most appropriate use of a vapor chamber. The issue (as seen below) is that RAM slots are pretty close together. So you're still relying on thin heatsinks pressed against the chips to get heat up to the heatpipe in the first place. For that same reason, a "vapor chamber" on the sides probably isn't physically possible. Also because the heatpipe is located a fair distance away from the heat source , it has limited efficacy.

    Ultimately I'd say a RAM slot cooler is more effective and replaceable than putting fans on each DIMM.
    Reply
  • cryoburner
    thisisaname said:
    tiny fans are going to need to spin fast and fast spinning fans are noisy.

    Would be better as alceryes says an put a better heatsink (with TIM). If the case has good air flow then cooling is not a problem.
    They don't necessarily need to spin fast. It's not not like RAM is pumping out a lot of heat to begin with. Performance RAM typically doesn't draw more than a few watts per module. DDR5 does move some additional circuitry onto the modules, though I doubt it makes much of a difference as far as heat dissipation goes. To improve cooling, the fans really just need to move a small amount of air under the heat spreaders.

    Of course, it's questionable whether any of this is needed. A lot of modules that add heat spreaders don't even technically need them, but add them because they look nice, and can justify higher prices for a minimal increase in manufacturing cost. And of course, the lights on RGB RAM are just there for looks, and if anything, add a small amount of heat, counter to what would make for an effective heat-spreader design. Likewise, I suspect these tiny fans are more about giving the product a "premium" look to justify higher pricing than something that will actually be all that useful. Similar or better results could have likely been achieved just by leaving out the RGB and adding some addition fins to the heat spreaders.

    It might be interesting to see a review of this RAM that tests the effectiveness of the fans, and whether or not they allow the modules to be overclocked to any further degree, or otherwise allow them to remain within safer temperature limits, by turning them off, or otherwise blocking them from spinning. Tests would need to be performed in configurations with both minimal and high case airflow, with the system heated up, as well as with the RGB enabled and disabled. Maybe even test without any heat spreaders at all, and with them swapped for a set off some budget RAM to achieve a baseline.
    Reply