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Ryzen Mobile Tuning Program Offers Overclocking-Like Capabilities for Ryzen Mobile Laptops

(Image credit: Imgur)

Reddit user kbsk1 has created a free program called "Renoir Mobile Tuning" (via Twitter), allowing users to manipulate power and thermal parameters on Renoir Ryzen Mobile 4000 series CPUs. This is a great solution for Ryzen laptops owners who want to tweak their processors to extract the most performance or efficiency. 

This tool can come in handy if you want to achieve better performance on your Ryzen laptop. The program allows you to dial in a higher-than-OEM power limit, which then keeps CPU clocks higher, and for longer, than the laptop would normally run under high load. Be aware, though, that you will probably bump up against the limits of the laptop's cooling subsystem, and increasing the power limits will also likely reduce battery life. In either case, this is about as close as you can get to overclocking a Ryzen laptop.

Controlling temperatures and increasing the longevity of Ryzen CPUs could be the most interesting use-case, though. Ryzen 4000 mobile CPUs are notorious for having super-aggressive boost algorithms that keep the processors in high temperature ranges. It isn't uncommon to see temperatures hit around the 95C range, and some laptops average 100C under full load. Technically these temperatures are in spec, the chips can reach 105C before throttling, and they have in-built mechanisms to prevent them from reaching exceeding the spec.

In either case, the relatively high chip temperatures result in more heat output from the laptop. As usual, dialing back the limits can also increase power efficiency (i.e., battery life) at the cost of a small amount of performance. So, for those of you who are interested in reducing temperatures or perhaps squeezing out a bit more battery life, you can decrease the temperature limit significantly with the Ryzen Mobile Tuning program. You can also decrease the power limit, which is obviously another method for reducing CPU temperatures and power consumption.

Just be aware that this is a third-party program, so use it at your own risk. Especially if you plan on increasing power limits, thus increasing stress on the laptop's CPU, cooling, and power delivery subsystem. The program is free, and you can download it on Github, but proceed at your own risk. 

  • Darkbreeze
    This is the second worst idea ever when it comes to laptops. The first worst, was AMD overdrive being able to overclock mobile parts. Most these laptops are barely able to maintain the delicate balance of cooling versus performance as it is, and they want to give a bunch of clueless laptop owners the ability to wreak havoc on these systems by overclocking them? Jebus. I bet there's going to be a lot of "my laptop is cooked" threads in the near future.
    Reply
  • LabRat 891
    The article also goes over the concept of using this tool to 'optimize' for battery life and overall product longevity. That said, this excites me as I already have used a similar tool on a ryzen 5 2500u series laptop with an upgraded cooler to effectively double its performance while staying WELL within thermal tolerances.

    Some 'consumer' laptops share cooling component compatibility with 'gaming' units and 'consumer' models with dedicated graphics chips. These coolers are designed for much more thermal load. In my example I was able to put a Nitro 5's cooler into an Aspire laptop, additional fan and all (with some custom wiring and soldering.)

    I do not know if there are any Renoir units with this capability, but it is not terribly uncommon to cut down on casing and component costs by sharing parts between varying configurations. I have also seen adventerous users of earlier APU laptops solder/thermal epoxy in additional heat exchangers and heat pipes.
    So, I think this is a fantastic and powerful tool for modders and power users or merely those willing to sacrifice performance for battery life and a cooler lap(top).
    Reply
  • keith12
    Kinda like Throttlestop for Ryzen! Can't be a bad thing. If throttlestop (or like) and it's benefits can come to Ryzen mobile, then it's worth a look.

    Hopefully it will allow Ryzen mobile users to undervolt CPU, and get the benefit of higher boosts and for longer.

    I run TS on my I7 9750h with a -142mv undervolt on CPU, the CPU now sits at it's all core max speed (4ghz) and temps in the mid 80's. Big difference at stock when temps will hit 95-100 and start throttling back to 3.2ghz.
    Reply
  • nofanneeded
    Overclocking ... lol The notebooks can barely sustain the maximum turbo mode for more than 15 minutes ..
    Reply
  • Darkbreeze
    nofanneeded said:
    Overclocking ... lol The notebooks can barely sustain the maximum turbo mode for more than 15 minutes ..
    Exactly my point. Put this on the "worst tech ideas of 2020" list.
    Reply
  • Darkbreeze
    keith12 said:
    Kinda like Throttlestop for Ryzen! Can't be a bad thing. If throttlestop (or like) and it's benefits can come to Ryzen mobile, then it's worth a look.

    Hopefully it will allow Ryzen mobile users to undervolt CPU, and get the benefit of higher boosts and for longer.

    I run TS on my I7 9750h with a -142mv undervolt on CPU, the CPU now sits at it's all core max speed (4ghz) and temps in the mid 80's. Big difference at stock when temps will hit 95-100 and start throttling back to 3.2ghz.
    What you would do with it, really doesn't matter. The fact is, thousands of idiots will drop the hammer on their overclocks, burn out their hardware, and then wonder why because "the manufacturer wouldn't have allowed this if it wasn't safe". It will be a full on chit show, if you know what I mean.
    Reply
  • keith12
    Darkbreeze said:
    The fact is, thousands of idiots will drop the hammer on their overclocks, burn out their hardware,
    Well, that's certainly an absolute, all encompassing statement ;) (and is not fact). Whilst I don't disagree necessarily, it's a little harsh. I'm not saying that anyone or someone (perhaps many) will try the tool and will maybe have some hard crashes, or freezes etc and come on here asking questions on how to fix this or that, but that's how we learn. The system will still likely throttle back or shut down to prevent damage to CPU/GPU. so not so sure about burning out hardware.

    Anyway, if it's half as useful as TS is for Intel chips, then it's noteworthy. Whether or not people have issue using it from lack of knowledge, that's something we just can't tell.

    That's my two cents!
    Reply
  • Darkbreeze
    Yes, it IS a fact. If you think it's not a fact, you clearly haven't spent all that much time on THIS or any other forum dealing with the numbskulls we deal with.
    Reply