Samsung's 256 GB UFS 2.0 Mobile Storage Is Twice As Fast As SATA SSDs

Samsung announced the industry's first 256GB embedded memory based on the Universal Flash Storage (UFS) 2.0 standard, which is meant to replace the eMMC standard. Samsung says that its new UFS 2.0 drive is faster even than some SATA-based SSDs for PCs.

"By providing high-density UFS memory that is nearly twice as fast as a SATA SSD for PCs, we will contribute to a paradigm shift within the mobile data storage marketup to 45,000 and 40,000 input/output operations per second (IOPS) for random reading and writing respectively," said Joo Sun Choi, Executive Vice President, Memory Sales and Marketing for Samsung Electronics. "We are determined to push the competitive edge in premium storage line-ups – OEM NVMe SSDs, external SSDs, and UFS – by moving aggressively to enhance performance and capacity in all three markets."

The new embedded storage module is based on Samsung's own V-NAND technology and comes with a "specially-designed high-performance controller." The latest UFS 2.0 memory supports up to 45,000 and 40,000 input/output operations per second (IOPS) for random reading and writing, respectively. That is twice as fast as the previous UFS generation that supported 19,000 and 14,000 IOPS for random read and write workloads.

Samsung's 256GB module achieves up to 850MB/s sequential read speed, which is twice as fast as many SATA SSDs. It also supports up to 256MB/s sequential write speed, which Samsung says is three times faster than what high-performance microSD cards can currently achieve.

These speeds should be more than fast enough to support 4k video playback, and the 256GB memory allows for storage of up to 47 Full HD movies, according to Samsung. The company also said that next-generation smartphones should support USB 3.0 speeds, which means you'll be able to transfer those large files much more quickly to your device as well.

Samsung had already announced the 128GB UFS 2.0 storage module a year ago, and since then the company managed to both double the capacity and the performance of the new 256GB module thanks to its V-NAND technology. The new storage chip should be available in products by the end of the year.

Lucian Armasu is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware. You can follow him at @lucian_armasu. 

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  • viperjt90
    This sounds awesome. I hope they can integrate this tech into other platforms. I.E Desktops, Cell phones, Consoles, etc. Cant beat speeds that are around 2X-3X faster than SATA SSD's.
  • jimmysmitty
    173817 said:
    This sounds awesome. I hope they can integrate this tech into other platforms. I.E Desktops, Cell phones, Consoles, etc. Cant beat speeds that are around 2X-3X faster than SATA SSD's.


    They already have. The Galaxy S6 line is using UFS 2.0 for its storage.
  • epobirs
    The description is a bit deceptive. If you look at the numbers, what they really mean is that they're twice as fast as really lousy SSDs. 850MB/s read speed is quite good on its own merits but when is the last time you considered buying a SATA SSD that topped out at 425MB/s?

    Then, when it comes to write speed, they change the comparison to microSD cards because staying with SATA SSDs would look even worse.

    This is utter marketing double talk. It's like they cannot help themselves when it comes to honest descriptions. The product is a big improvement over what it is intended to replace but apparently they feel that isn't enough to sell it, even though the target market isn't consumer but rather product design engineers who know better.

    So, yes, we're talking a substantial improvement for mobile devices but go by the actual numbers and not the deceptive language.