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Microsoft Squashes Bugs With Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 15058

Microsoft released Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 15058 to Fast Ring members of the Windows Insider Program. Much like other recent preview builds, this latest offering is more focused on addressing problems with earlier updates than on adding new features to the operating system.

The company said Build 15058 fixed problems that would cause inbox apps to crash on launch; squashed a number of bugs relating to the Microsoft Edge browser; and nixed some particularly worrisome issues that made Windows crash when a device went to sleep or certain settings were accessed. Minor flaws, such as a mouse pointer staying visible during a full screen video or apps showing their package name in the title bar, were also addressed.

Microsoft also offered some more information about a bug causing games to crash when they're launched. The company said that "a misconfiguration of advertising ID that happened in a prior build" created problems for new user accounts created in Build 15031 and persisted across subsequent builds. If you're affected by this problem, Microsoft said in its blog post that deleting the following registry key should stop it from reoccurring:

HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\AdvertisingInfo

This build still has some problems, of course, some of which have been present for a while. If you're interested in giving Microsoft's new Beam game broadcasting service a shot, for example, you should know that "certain hardware configurations" might "cause the broadcast live review window in the Game bar to flash Green while you are Broadcasting." But don't fret-- the problem is only visible to broadcasters and doesn't show up on streams.

That's Build 15058 in a nutshell. You can find the complete list of bug fixes and known issues in Microsoft's blog post. If you're interested to know what else has been teased via these preview builds, such as a new picture-in-picture feature, the performance enhancing Game Mode, or various improvements to Cortana, we've got you covered. All these features and more should publicly debut with the Windows 10 Creators Update this Spring.

  • problematiq
    Now fix where it warns you that it's about to restart and you click the restart later button, and it restarts the pc. Also the upgrade windows 7 to 10 bugs, like the random BSOD's and the OS self destruction, like the bug that caused anyone using 3rd party drive encryption software to have their OS's self-destruct.
    Reply
  • timbo80
    Hasen't windows always self-destructed given enough time over the years? Dont think, save for "maybe" Win NT, i ever remember a consumer windows build being totally stable and not slowly corrupting itself regardless of the hardware it runs on.
    Personally, i usually install apps to an secondary drive now and save "all" important data to a media drive or NAS and just plan on it crapping out and having to re-install. I know the push is for Win10 now, but honestly i got almost a year out of 8.1 and a brand new 10 build is showing signs of corruption less than a month after install. Mind you this is all on too shelf hardware and overclocking is not in the mix to hang problems on.
    Boy oh boy would it be nice to get a genuinely stable build from microsoft vs all the "features" they keep trying to add on and cram down everyone's throats...
    Just my 2c,
    Tim
    Reply
  • dstarr3
    19429358 said:
    Hasen't windows always self-destructed given enough time over the years? Dont think, save for "maybe" Win NT, i ever remember a consumer windows build being totally stable and not slowly corrupting itself regardless of the hardware it runs on.
    Personally, i usually install apps to an secondary drive now and save "all" important data to a media drive or NAS and just plan on it crapping out and having to re-install. I know the push is for Win10 now, but honestly i got almost a year out of 8.1 and a brand new 10 build is showing signs of corruption less than a month after install. Mind you this is all on too shelf hardware and overclocking is not in the mix to hang problems on.
    Boy oh boy would it be nice to get a genuinely stable build from microsoft vs all the "features" they keep trying to add on and cram down everyone's throats...
    Just my 2c,
    Tim

    My current Windows 7 installation is about 6 years old, even migrated from one PC to a new one. Don't have any problems whatsoever. Extremely stable OS even over a very long time.
    Reply
  • Giroro
    What is an "advertising ID" and how do I permanently get it off of my computer?
    Reply
  • cwolf78
    ANONYMOUS SAID:
    Hasen't windows always self-destructed given enough time over the years?

    As a MCSE and a Windows user since 3.1, (NT 4.0 on the server side), I have to disagree. Sure, Windows installations get slower over time with "crud" especially in the old days, and sure, some Windows versions are less stable than others - but to say that they become completely unusable is just untrue barring hardware or malware issues. The closest thing I can even think of is adding or removing hardware or roles from NT 4.0 was sometimes a process that required a reinstall of the OS (no plug and play,) but once it got up and running it was as stable as a rock. I'd say Windows ME was among the most unstable on the consumer side. I think the pinnacle was probably Windows 8.1, questionable GUI design notwithstanding. Windows 10 is certainly a step back in terms of stability, but each officially released build tends to get incrementally better.
    Reply