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AOC AG271QX Agon 27-inch FreeSync Monitor Review

Brightness & Contrast

To read about our monitor tests in depth, please check out Display Testing Explained: How We Test Monitors and TVs.Brightness and Contrast testing is covered on page two.

Uncalibrated – Maximum Backlight Level

A 27" monitor strikes a great balance between screen area and footprint, making it awesome for gaming. Today’s group is made up of such displays. All offer QHD resolution except the Acer XB271HK, which is Ultra HD. In addition to our review subject, we have Asus’ PG279Q and MG278Q, Dell’s SE2717H, and AOC’s G2770PF. Adaptive refresh is standard fare as well with both AMD and Nvidia represented.

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If the AG271QX offered a backlight strobe (it doesn’t), it would have more than ample output to overcome the light reduction. Instead, take the Agon to your favorite sun porch or brightly-lit office to play. You’ll still see a sharp picture with decent punch. As a TN display, it doesn’t have the contrast of a VA panel, and it comes up a tad short of the others here too at 935.8:1. That’s due to its elevated black level of .4041 at the maximum brightness setting. Dynamic range can be stretched with the DCR option, but that will introduce some clipping and image pumping. Better to follow our calibration suggestions to maximize gamma performance. That results in a really good looking image.

Uncalibrated – Minimum Backlight Level

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The backlight drops a little below the useful point at its lowest level. To dial in 50cd/m2, set the slider to 4 when playing in a completely darkened environment. Your eyes will thank you after a couple of hours of fragging. Contrast drops a tiny bit here too but not enough to cause concern. Performance is consistent at every backlight setting.

After Calibration to 200cd/m2

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Thanks to RGB sliders that begin at center range, we actually gained a bit of contrast from calibration. This is a rarity in our experience and it moves the AG271QX up to third place in the group. It’s possible one could tell the MG278Q from the others in a side-by-side comparison, but the top five screens will look identical to the naked eye. We’re still dreaming of that QHD resolution VA monitor with adaptive refresh and 144Hz, but alas, it doesn’t exist yet. This new Agon will fill the bill pretty well however. We’re satisfied with its image depth.

ANSI Contrast Ratio

ANSI contrast stays within a whisker of the sequential number which indicates quality parts and construction. The AG271QX has not cut corners in the hardware department. This result is aided by our sample’s superb field uniformity which measures higher than almost any other monitor we’ve tested. Check out that result on page five.

  • Voliax
    It looks great but i prefer ASUS products anyway.
    Reply
  • JQB45
    I've had a standard AOC 27" 1080p 60hz monitor for nearly 4 years now and would give this a try except I don't want red.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    Very good monitor indeed!

    Just need 4K monitor that can also go down to 30MHz, and maybe even IPS it would be perfect. But of course it would also cost a lot more.
    But a good gaming monitor, this is in anyway. I personally prefer wider wieving angles, with more accurate colors, but that it only a personal preference.
    Reply
  • uglyduckling81
    So Free-sync has the same operating frequency as G-Sync. Remind me why G-Sync monitors more expensive again?
    It would be amazing if they would just shit can G-Sync so we aren't screwed over by buying one type or the other.
    There is no way in hell I'm buying G-Sync now that Free-Sync is it's equal but far cheaper.
    Reply
  • thor220
    19094929 said:
    So Free-sync has the same operating frequency as G-Sync. Remind me why G-Sync monitors more expensive again?
    It would be amazing if they would just shit can G-Sync so we aren't screwed over by buying one type or the other.
    There is no way in hell I'm buying G-Sync now that Free-Sync is it's equal but far cheaper.

    Actually Free-Sync is theoretically better. The bottom refresh rate is 4 Hz, it's just that no monitor has implemented anything like this.
    Reply
  • Virtual_Singularity
    Thanks for the Review. Too bad the BenQ XL2730Z, known now as BenQ Zowie XL2730 (TN/FS, $549) and Acer XG270HU (TN/FS, $469) weren't included as comparison monitors, as the AOC AG271QX seems to be in direct competition with both, especially the BenQ though.
    Reply
  • nitrium
    19094929 said:
    So Free-sync has the same operating frequency as G-Sync. Remind me why G-Sync monitors more expensive again?
    It would be amazing if they would just shit can G-Sync so we aren't screwed over by buying one type or the other.
    There is no way in hell I'm buying G-Sync now that Free-Sync is it's equal but far cheaper.
    Well the reason is because nVidia is screwing its customers (who mostly lap it up) by leveraging their popularity with proprietary technology in order to maximise profits. So it's just business to them (as it should be, given they have shareholders and board to answer to). Doesn't mean you have to happy about OR support them. I stopped doing just that a few years ago, despite being an nVidiot for almost two decades.
    Reply
  • cinergy
    I'd be interested if this model came 24" version and lower price. If I want bigger screen, I can use my tv when needed.
    Reply
  • zivnix
    Could you please review PIXIO PX277?
    Reply
  • zivnix
    CINERGY, check out AOC G2460PF.
    Reply