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Asus MG279Q 27-Inch FreeSync Monitor Review

Today we're reviewing Asus' MG279Q FreeSync gaming monitor, looking at how well it compares to Acer's XB270HU IPS G-Sync monitor?

Packaging, Physical Layout And Accessories

Packaging of the MG279Q is sturdy and strong and should provide plenty of protection against the rigors of shipping. The base, upright and panel require assembly, which is easily accomplished without tools. The panel snaps on and locks down with a slider switch, which is a design we haven't seen before.

Bundled cables include an IEC power cord, DisplayPort and HDMI; our sample did not include a USB cable. You also get the manual on CD and a printed quick-start guide.

Product 360

Assembled, the MG279Q sports excellent build quality with firm movements and no wiggly parts or cheap plastic in evidence. The bezel is extremely narrow, which makes it a great candidate for multi-screen setups. In the lower right you'll see small icons denoting the functions of the control keys, which are around back. The icons are almost impossible to see but you'll get a feel for them quickly, like we did. The best part is the menu navigation, which is managed by a tiny joystick. Moving between screens and setting options is extremely quick and intuitive.

The anti-glare layer is similar to all the other monitors we've reviewed of late. Reflections aren't a problem in the average room and we saw no grain or other artifacts. Text and other small objects are rendered with good clarity and sharpness.

From the side, the MG279Q presents a chiseled profile consisting entirely of straight lines. Ventilation is provided around the central bulge and the monitor always ran cool in our tests. The stand is fully adjustable with 120 degrees of swivel, 25 degrees tilt and nearly six inches of height available. One unusual thing we noted is that the base moves with the upright when swiveling. A hidden disc underneath stays put to prevent marking your desktop.

On the back you can see a small snap-on cable management piece on the upright. Also pictured here are the control keys and OSD joystick. Menu operation is super-easy since the joystick is also a button. We were able to change settings in a flash.

Inputs are all-digital and include DisplayPort, mini-DisplayPort and two HDMI ports with MHL. Also provided is an analog headphone jack. The USB hub is version 3.0, but there are only two downstream ports on the bottom and none on the sides. The upside is you can set an option in the OSD to keep them powered when the monitor is off.

  • Kridian
    I'll buy one when they get to the $300 mark. Come on OLED, let's push some prices down!
    Reply
  • moogleslam
    Any 21:9 3440x1440p G-Sync/FreeSync monitor reviews on the horizon? Thanks
    Reply
  • ceberle
    Any 21:9 3440x1440p G-Sync/FreeSync monitor reviews on the horizon? Thanks

    I've just finished testing the Acer XR341CK. Look for the review soon!

    -Christian-
    Reply
  • moogleslam
    16520347 said:
    Any 21:9 3440x1440p G-Sync/FreeSync monitor reviews on the horizon? Thanks

    I've just finished testing the Acer XR341CK. Look for the review soon!

    -Christian-

    Awesome Christian - thank you! This week? :) Will you be reviewing the G-Sync version when it comes out also? It's supposedly a little different in that it will be 100Hz whereas the FreeSync is 75Hz. Thanks

    Reply
  • nate1492
    You tested a $600 144hz ips monitor with a $150 graphics card and you didn't push the framerates?

    I don't see the validity of this review, why would you use such a middle range graphics card for a high end monitor? I don't see many people shelling out $600 for monitor and $150 for a gfx card!

    It almost sounds like you chose the amd 285 because you realized it couldn't push the monitor to the upper 100s FPS.
    Reply
  • nate1492
    You tested a $600 144hz ips monitor with a $150 graphics card and you didn't push the framerates?

    I don't see the validity of this review, why would you use such a middle range graphics card for a high end monitor? I don't see many people shelling out $600 for monitor and $150 for a gfx card!

    It almost sounds like you chose the amd 285 because you realized it couldn't push the monitor to the upper 100s FPS.
    Reply
  • TechyInAZ
    Looks good, at least free sync users now get an IPS monitor for themselves.
    Reply
  • picture_perfect
    why would you use such a middle range graphics card for a high end monitor?.

    The results will probably be more in line with people's experience. Great review. I prefer fps over resolution so will pass on this monitor.
    Reply
  • hannibal
    The problem in image quality is when the frame rate drops too low, so not too powerfull GPU is good for testing that. If you have GPU that can run 144 FPS all the time, it does not need G-sync of Freesync...
    And I personally would put any day more money to monitor than graphic card. Good monitor is so much better deal in the long run!
    Reply
  • skit75
    16520396 said:
    You tested a $600 144hz ips monitor with a $150 graphics card and you didn't push the framerates?

    I don't see the validity of this review, why would you use such a middle range graphics card for a high end monitor? I don't see many people shelling out $600 for monitor and $150 for a gfx card!

    It almost sounds like you chose the amd 285 because you realized it couldn't push the monitor to the upper 100s FPS.

    What would be the point of that? It is a QHD IPS panel with a known sync range. If you have a monster GPU, just get a 144Hz monitor and be done. You likely don't need Free-Sync or G-Sync if all your games play at 100FPS +.
    Reply