3 Under-$500 PC Builds for Playing Games Like Fortnite

It’s a tough time to be a PC builder or a PC gamer. In case you haven’t noticed, midrange-to-high-end graphics cards are selling for hundreds more than their MSRPs—if you can find them in stock at all. And other high-end components are surprisingly expensive, as well, due to demands from cryptocurrency mining (among other factors). As much as we hate to admit it, we haven't seen a grimmer time to build a high-end gaming PC for decades.

That makes Fortnite the right game at the right time for our ongoing "pricey PC hardware" crisis. It runs well on midrange (and even low-end) hardware, and it’s quickly becoming the most popular PC game in recent memory, breaking records left and right, garnering coverage all over mainstream media. It's even getting NBA players hopelessly addicted in their off-hours.

Given Fortnite’s seemingly ever-increasing popularity, and the fact that it runs well on affordable parts, it’s also the perfect excuse for us to work up a budget PC-build story--and contest--around. We all need a bit of relief from dreaming about $1,000-plus graphics cards and what (if any) relief might come from future cards expected later this year (but probably won’t).

So, we set the Tom's Hardware community to one of the tasks it does best: working out ways to build affordable PCs. In this case, we asked our forum members to part out their best budget builds specifically for Fortnite. We gave them a $500 budget (Windows license aside), told them we’d give extra consideration for builds that come in well under that bar, and set them loose on PCPartpicker.

A week later, we had over 60 submissions, some sliding under the $300 mark. Below you’ll find our top three picks of the bunch, along with a detailed parts list so you can build your own.

Beware The BIOS!

Keep in mind, though, that there is a, how shall we put it, "complication" with some of these builds. Namely: You may need to find a way to update the BIOS of an older motherboard in order to to install a newer CPU. AMD has a solution for this problem in its Raven Ridge Boot Kit (which has you mail away for a loaner chip to accomplish the update). But our winning build doesn’t require any BIOS updates, to boot. That’s one of the big reasons it’s a winner.

On the AMD side, motherboards are just coming online as we write this that are marked “Ryzen 2000 Ready,” which means their BIOS has been flashed at the factory to support 2018-era AMD chips. And we suspect that new mainstream Intel 300-series chipsets will arrive sometime soon; boards based on these should provide affordable alternatives to the complications of pairing a newer CPU with a previous-generation motherboard.
 
While board-complication issues are likely to improve soon, they were tough to avoid at the time we tasked our community to put these builds together. So keep that in mind, and plan accordingly, if you’re parting out one of the builds below for your next budget PC.

Below, you'll find our three favorite Fortnite PC-build submissions, along with links to all the parts, should you want to build one of these budget gaming boxes yourself and jump into battle.

Best Budget Fortnite PC Builds: Our Top Three Picks...


"Big Things Come In Small Packages"
"Raven Ridge Hybrid"
"Sheer Affordability"
Total Cost$482.71$445.93$398.75
CaseThermaltake Core V21 MicroATX MiniThermaltake Versa H21 Window ATXDIYPC Zondda-O ATX
CoolingCryorig H7 49.0 CFM
CPUIntel Pentium G4560AMD Ryzen 5 2400GAMD Ryzen 5 2400G
GraphicsMSI GeForce GTX 1050 2GB
MemoryG.Skill Ripjaws V Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-3200G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-3200G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2800
MotherboardGigabyte GA-B250M-DS3HASRock AB350M-HDVASRock AB350M-HDV
PSUSeaSonic S12II 520WCorsair CX (2017) 450WCorsair CX (2017) 450W
StorageWestern Digital Caviar Blue 1TBSeagate 500GB 5400RPM HybridHitachi 1TB 7200RPM
Built Byg-unit1111drinkingcola86ScrewySqrl

BEST OVERALL BUILD: "Big Things Come In Small Packages"

(Built By: g-unit1111)

Thoughts From The Builder: "On a $500 budget, you have to make some sacrifices, but you can still get a good system. I have come to embrace small form factor builds--especially Mini-ITX and MicroATX. And the nice thing is that you don't have to compromise on looks, since there are some very nice cases that fit the $500 budget.

I originally wanted to do a Ryzen 1200 build, but it couldn't be done and still get quality components under $500. So with that, the Pentium G was chosen because, for the price, it can't be beat. And even in a game like Fortnite, you definitely need some graphics horsepower. The GTX 1050 is the best GPU for a budget that small."

Kudos From The Editors: We like this build for a number of reasons, but it stands out primarily as one of the only submissions we received that doesn’t kick up a potential BIOS bother. The B250 motherboard natively supports the dual-core, four-thread Kaby Lake Pentium CPU, so you should have no problems on that front--just drop in the chip and go. The case, board, and graphics card are also all compact, making for a space-saving system.

RUNNER-UP: The "Raven Ridge Hybrid" Build

(Built By: drinkingcola86)

Thoughts From The Builder: "My focus was on finding a board that would allow overclocking, better cooling for the CPU/GPU, and high speed ram within the 8GB range. I was trying to find a small SSD for the price range, but couldn't within the budget, which pushed me toward the SSHD from Seagate for faster load times and quicker boot times. The case was the cheapest case with OK air flow and extra expansion for more fans. The power supply was based on reviews, allowance for overclocking on the CPU/GPU, and an 80+ Bronze rating. The reason for the APU was that it allows playing Fortnite at 1080p/medium quality with decent frame rates at stock settings."

Kudos From The Editors: This was a well-balanced build with a hybrid hard drive. Opting for AMD’s recent “Raven Ridge” Ryzen 5 processor with Vega graphics means there’s no need for a dedicated graphics card. And we know from our testing that the chip handles games that are more demanding than Fortnite, so you won’t miss a dedicated GPU here.

While we applaud the fact that this build comes in about $54 under budget, keep in mind that the motherboard will require a BIOS update before it accepts the second-generation Ryzen chip chosen here. So you’ll either have to have on hand a 1000-series Ryzen chip to perform the update, or be prepared to mail away for AMD’s previously mentioned Boot Kit.(Note that you might be able to find a near variant of the ASRock board chosen that comes "Ryzen-2000 ready," eliminating the need to use the Boot Kit, and for close to the same money. So keep an eye on the specific board listings at your retailer of choice.)

Loading...

RUNNER-UP: The "Sheer Affordability" Build

(Built By: ScrewySqrl)

Thoughts From The Builder: "Basically, for this build I wanted the maximum performance for the least cost, and to be competitive with the cost of buying a console. The Ryzen 2400G offered the best GPU and CPU I could get inside of this tight of a budget, and it should be able to do at least medium settings, rather than low. I'd much rather have its 4-core/8-thread over a Pentium’s 2-core/4-threads. Eight GB [of RAM] is minimal, but enough for Fortnite, with high speed for better performance. The power supply is a solidly reliable one that won't be pushed by the power this system uses, while the disk-based HDD and cheap case save costs without sacrificing performance. The HDD means only slower load times, not fewer frames per second."

Kudos From The Editors: ScrewySqrl’s build has the same BIOS issue as the previous build, so you’ll need an older Ryzen chip to update the motherboard BIOS or go the AMD Boot Kit route. (Or again: Opt for a slightly different motherboard.) But it’s hard to fault a build that edges in at under $400, while still delivering enough muscle to run Fortnite.

In an ideal world, we’d like dual-channel memory to better push AMD’s integrated Vega graphics. And if we had that $100 left over, we’d personally spend at least some of it on an SSD boot drive. But again, this is a sub-$400 gaming PC in an age where you can easily spend thousands. We’re not complaining—much, anyway.

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  • Ilya__
    No SSDs? One even has single channel RAM for Ryzen 2400G? - which benefits greatly form Dual-Channel. Not really liking the picks to be honest, meh...

    Update: Anyone care to explain the votedowns? Disagree?
  • mitch074
    If you couple that R5 2400G with 16Gb of DDR4-3200, you end up with a system that's under 500 bucks, that does perform much better than single channel DDR4-2800 (the Raven Ridge REQUIRES bandwidth, as in "30% better performance") and where you can add a 1070Ti-grade graphics card down the line without changing anything else in the system - and suddenly end up with a good gaming machine, that you can overclock some. Add a small SSD for the OS, and here we go.
  • Gadhar
    ScrewySqrl’s build has one major problem and that is a single stick of ram. Many tests show that the new Ryzen APU's performance suffers when not using dual channel. As I type this there may already have been ppl pointing this out, but I was at lunch and just got back to put my two cents in. Cheers
  • gggplaya
    Newegg sells a few B350 motherboards that specifically state ryzen 2000 ready on their website. So no worries about the bios needing an older chip.
  • salgado18
    A 2x4 kit costs the same as 1x8. I think that's the only problem with that build. Otherwise, can't go any cheaper than that without losing performance.

    Second build is the same, but with overclocking in mind. Also a good one.

    First one is good, will perform better than the rest, but the dead socket is a no-go for me. There's no other good CPU for that price, I know, but the (near) future sacrifice is not worth it. As much as I also like small, on a tight budget I think it would be better to go with a cheap mATX case and a Ryzen 1200/2200G, or an i3-8100/R1300X (although that could slightly break the $500 barrier).
  • artk2219
    I'm not a fan of the big things come in small packages build, that pentium and more specifically that socket will age badly, where as the AM4 builds allow much more upgrade ability in the future. It is small but, meh, if you wanted that, you could build something like the one below. My biggest gripe is the 2400 memory, but you could try your hand at overclocking it.

    [PCPartPicker part list](https://pcpartpicker.com/list/WVnGGG) / [Price breakdown by merchant](https://pcpartpicker.com/list/WVnGGG/by_merchant/)

    Type|Item|Price
    :----|:----|:----
    **CPU** | [AMD - Ryzen 5 2400G 3.6GHz Quad-Core Processor](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FGPKHx/amd-ryzen-5-2400g-36ghz-quad-core-processor-yd2400c5fbbox) | $162.79 @ OutletPC
    **Motherboard** | [Gigabyte - GA-AB350N-Gaming WIFI (rev. 1.0) Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/4YkwrH/gigabyte-ga-ab350n-gaming-wifi-rev-10-mini-itx-am4-motherboard-ga-ab350n-gaming-wifi-rev-10) | $99.99 @ Newegg
    **Memory** | [ADATA - 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FxgzK8/adata-8gb-2-x-4gb-ddr4-2400-memory-ax4u2400w4g16-drg) | $83.99 @ Newegg
    **Storage** | [ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/M3RzK8/adata-ultimate-su650-240gb-25-solid-state-drive-asu650ss-240gt-c) | $65.50 @ Newegg
    **Case** | [Cooler Master - Elite 130 Mini ITX Tower Case](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/6wR48d/cooler-master-case-rc130kkn1) | $39.99 @ Amazon
    **Power Supply** | [Corsair - CX (2017) 450W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Q7L7YJ/corsair-cx-2017-450w-80-bronze-certified-atx-power-supply-cp-9020120-na) | $43.88 @ OutletPC
    | *Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts* |
    | **Total** | **$496.14**
    | Generated by [PCPartPicker](http://pcpartpicker.com) 2018-03-28 14:12 EDT-0400 |
  • Colin_10
    I love when the community comes together to solve a problem like this. Really nice work all around everyone.
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    REALLY? mine was superior!
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    387420 said:
    I'm not a fan of the big things come in small packages build, that pentium and more specifically that socket will age badly, where as the AM4 builds allow much more upgrade ability in the future. It is small but, meh, if you wanted that, you could build something like the one below. My biggest gripe is the 2400 memory, but you could try your hand at overclocking it. [PCPartPicker part list](https://pcpartpicker.com/list/WVnGGG) / [Price breakdown by merchant](https://pcpartpicker.com/list/WVnGGG/by_merchant/) Type|Item|Price :----|:----|:---- **CPU** | [AMD - Ryzen 5 2400G 3.6GHz Quad-Core Processor](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FGPKHx/amd-ryzen-5-2400g-36ghz-quad-core-processor-yd2400c5fbbox) | $162.79 @ OutletPC **Motherboard** | [Gigabyte - GA-AB350N-Gaming WIFI (rev. 1.0) Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/4YkwrH/gigabyte-ga-ab350n-gaming-wifi-rev-10-mini-itx-am4-motherboard-ga-ab350n-gaming-wifi-rev-10) | $99.99 @ Newegg **Memory** | [ADATA - 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FxgzK8/adata-8gb-2-x-4gb-ddr4-2400-memory-ax4u2400w4g16-drg) | $83.99 @ Newegg **Storage** | [ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/M3RzK8/adata-ultimate-su650-240gb-25-solid-state-drive-asu650ss-240gt-c) | $65.50 @ Newegg **Case** | [Cooler Master - Elite 130 Mini ITX Tower Case](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/6wR48d/cooler-master-case-rc130kkn1) | $39.99 @ Amazon **Power Supply** | [Corsair - CX (2017) 450W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Q7L7YJ/corsair-cx-2017-450w-80-bronze-certified-atx-power-supply-cp-9020120-na) | $43.88 @ OutletPC | *Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts* | | **Total** | **$496.14** | Generated by [PCPartPicker](http://pcpartpicker.com) 2018-03-28 14:12 EDT-0400 |


    I agree , look at my build far superior.

    "Just RITE for FORTNITE"
    Build Quality is first rate


    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($99.99 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: ASRock - A320M Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($48.75 @ Newegg)
    Memory: GeIL - EVO POTENZA 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($81.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital - BLACK SERIES 500GB 2.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($35.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: MSI - GeForce GTX 1050 2GB Video Card ($144.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Cooler Master - MasterBox Lite 5 ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($61.89 @ Newegg)
    Total: $513.58
    Minus Shipping: $15.97
    Base Total: $497.61
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-03-07 20:06 EST-0500
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    Seasonic S12II 520W...Not compatible with the G4560 sleep states.
    http://www.bit-tech.net/news/seasonic-confirms-list-of-haswell-compatibl/1/
  • artk2219
    276663 said:
    387420 said:
    I'm not a fan of the big things come in small packages build, that pentium and more specifically that socket will age badly, where as the AM4 builds allow much more upgrade ability in the future. It is small but, meh, if you wanted that, you could build something like the one below. My biggest gripe is the 2400 memory, but you could try your hand at overclocking it. [PCPartPicker part list](https://pcpartpicker.com/list/WVnGGG) / [Price breakdown by merchant](https://pcpartpicker.com/list/WVnGGG/by_merchant/) Type|Item|Price :----|:----|:---- **CPU** | [AMD - Ryzen 5 2400G 3.6GHz Quad-Core Processor](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FGPKHx/amd-ryzen-5-2400g-36ghz-quad-core-processor-yd2400c5fbbox) | $162.79 @ OutletPC **Motherboard** | [Gigabyte - GA-AB350N-Gaming WIFI (rev. 1.0) Mini ITX AM4 Motherboard](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/4YkwrH/gigabyte-ga-ab350n-gaming-wifi-rev-10-mini-itx-am4-motherboard-ga-ab350n-gaming-wifi-rev-10) | $99.99 @ Newegg **Memory** | [ADATA - 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FxgzK8/adata-8gb-2-x-4gb-ddr4-2400-memory-ax4u2400w4g16-drg) | $83.99 @ Newegg **Storage** | [ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/M3RzK8/adata-ultimate-su650-240gb-25-solid-state-drive-asu650ss-240gt-c) | $65.50 @ Newegg **Case** | [Cooler Master - Elite 130 Mini ITX Tower Case](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/6wR48d/cooler-master-case-rc130kkn1) | $39.99 @ Amazon **Power Supply** | [Corsair - CX (2017) 450W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Q7L7YJ/corsair-cx-2017-450w-80-bronze-certified-atx-power-supply-cp-9020120-na) | $43.88 @ OutletPC | *Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts* | | **Total** | **$496.14** | Generated by [PCPartPicker](http://pcpartpicker.com) 2018-03-28 14:12 EDT-0400 |
    I agree , look at my build far superior. "Just RITE for FORTNITE"
    Build Quality is first rate
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant CPU: AMD - Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($99.99 @ Amazon) Motherboard: ASRock - A320M Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($48.75 @ Newegg) Memory: GeIL - EVO POTENZA 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($81.99 @ Newegg) Storage: Western Digital - BLACK SERIES 500GB 2.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($35.99 @ Amazon) Video Card: MSI - GeForce GTX 1050 2GB Video Card ($144.98 @ Newegg) Case: Cooler Master - MasterBox Lite 5 ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Amazon) Power Supply: SeaSonic - 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($61.89 @ Newegg) Total: $513.58 Minus Shipping: $15.97 Base Total: $497.61 Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-03-07 20:06 EST-0500


    I also agree, but man oh man these graphics prices right now. On the plus I see there is a Vega 56 for under 700 for the first time since like november.

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814137263
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    Cards prices are a sham , just making money now...And the G4560 is really just a DUAL Core. How does that compute when compared to my true QUAD CORE AMD build.
  • Barty1884
    2161153 said:
    No SSDs?


    On a <$500 there's going to be sacrifices - and the SSD should be the one to go before much else IMO. They're nice & all, but for the strict task as hand best budget builds specifically for Fortnite. an SSD isn't bringing any performance to the table.

    2161153 said:
    One even has single channel RAM for Ryzen 2400G?


    Yeah, a little perplexed by that one too.

    51666 said:
    If you couple that R5 2400G with 16Gb of DDR4-3200, you end up with a system that's under 500 bucks, that does perform much better than single channel DDR4-2800


    And yet will come nowhere close to a G4560 +1050 in Fortnite.

    120171 said:
    First one is good, will perform better than the rest, but the dead socket is a no-go for me. There's no other good CPU for that price, I know, but the (near) future sacrifice is not worth it.


    Definitely a valid argument in almost every other scenario. Task at hand though, relates to Fortnite and <$500.

    276663 said:


    I do like this build, for what it is. I assume there was not B350 board that worked in budget at the time...... and the RAM could be faster.... budget limited though, and definitely more beneficial (IMO) than a single DIMM of faster memory.

    276663 said:
    Seasonic S12II 520W...Not compatible with the G4560 sleep states. http://www.bit-tech.net/news/seasonic-confirms-list-of-haswell-compatibl/1/


    Same deal as above though. For the task at hand, the lack of sleep state support isn't too relevant. Not going to stop the system posting, nor playing Fortnite.
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    Dual Core vs my true QUAD Core and my quality was superior. Hands down superior performance.
    Strange picks for sure.


    COMMUNITY should have voted.
  • Barty1884
    276663 said:
    Dual Core vs my true QUAD Core and my quality was superior. Hands down superior performance.
    Strange picks for sure.

    COMMUNITY should have voted.


    Generally speaking, yes. It would be a preferred system overall.

    For Fortnite directly though, they'd be near identical....... with the G4560 actually likely to have better 1% and .1%'s?

    Raw CPU performance in the title, would be near identical and potentially a little in Ryzen's faovr *if* the 2200G could be overclocked. It it couldn't be on the A320 (XFR/Boost would probably be enough on the relevant cores to still keep them neck & neck though)

    https://www.techspot.com/article/1579-overclocking-guide-ryzen-3-2200g/

    Agreed on the community vote though.....
  • g-unit1111
    387420 said:
    I'm not a fan of the big things come in small packages build, that pentium and more specifically that socket will age badly, where as the AM4 builds allow much more upgrade ability in the future. It is small but, meh, if you wanted that, you could build something like the one below. My biggest gripe is the 2400 memory, but you could try your hand at overclocking it.


    Did you read what I wrote? I said that I wanted to make this a Ryzen 3 1200 build but couldn't make it work due to the budget constraints. If I could I would have a Ryzen 3 1200, GTX 1050, and an SSD but having a budget that small prevents me from doing these things.
  • artk2219
    537231 said:
    387420 said:
    I'm not a fan of the big things come in small packages build, that pentium and more specifically that socket will age badly, where as the AM4 builds allow much more upgrade ability in the future. It is small but, meh, if you wanted that, you could build something like the one below. My biggest gripe is the 2400 memory, but you could try your hand at overclocking it.
    Did you read what I wrote? I said that I wanted to make this a Ryzen 3 1200 build but couldn't make it work due to the budget constraints. If I could I would have a Ryzen 3 1200, GTX 1050, and an SSD but having a budget that small prevents me from doing these things.


    I get that, and I'm not attacking you personally man (i'm sorry if it came through that way), just voicing my concerns with the choice, then again its been near a month since these builds were drawn up, and I have the benefit of calculating with probably slightly lower prices. Lol, we could have changed out the R3 1200 and R5 2400G for an Athlon x4 950 :D. But honestly that will probably be a little weak, although i am currently using one for my day to day rig (it's really not that bad) because I want to play with one, and I'm still deciding where I want to go from here (I love all of the options we have on AM4 and TR4).
  • g-unit1111
    387420 said:
    I get that, and I'm not attacking you personally man (i'm sorry if it came through that way), just voicing my concerns with the choice, then again its been near a month since these builds were drawn up, and I have the benefit of calculating with probably slightly lower prices. Lol, we could have changed out the R3 1200 and R5 2400G for an Athlon x4 950 :D. But honestly that will probably be a little weak, although i am currently using one for my day to day rig (it's really not that bad) because I want to play with one, and I'm still deciding where I want to go from here (I love all of the options we have on AM4 and TR4).


    Yeah true, we all have our opinions. I mean we could sit here and nit pick the nuances of one part choice over the other until dawn. I would personally pick an AM4 rig but after an hour or so playing around on PC Part Picker I just couldn't make it work without sacrificing build quality. In the end I'd rather go for a quality rig with lots of upgrade potential than one that doesn't have that. But that's just my build philosophy.
  • artk2219
    537231 said:
    387420 said:
    I get that, and I'm not attacking you personally man (i'm sorry if it came through that way), just voicing my concerns with the choice, then again its been near a month since these builds were drawn up, and I have the benefit of calculating with probably slightly lower prices. Lol, we could have changed out the R3 1200 and R5 2400G for an Athlon x4 950 :D. But honestly that will probably be a little weak, although i am currently using one for my day to day rig (it's really not that bad) because I want to play with one, and I'm still deciding where I want to go from here (I love all of the options we have on AM4 and TR4).
    Yeah true, we all have our opinions. I mean we could sit here and nit pick the nuances of one part choice over the other until dawn. I would personally pick an AM4 rig but after an hour or so playing around on PC Part Picker I just couldn't make it work without sacrificing build quality. In the end I'd rather go for a quality rig with lots of upgrade potential than one that doesn't have that. But that's just my build philosophy.


    Just for giggles I tried to build up something with a 4gb card, and I can just make it work with an Athlon x4 950 and a RX 560 (1024 shaders). You're right though, its not an ideal build, its still lacking in storage, the cpu will slightly hold you back from time to time (although not by much), the gpu could be better (for the current prices its the cheapest decent 4GB card i could find), and the case is meh (although i do like how simple it looks), but eh, it could be worse. Honestly with prices as they currently are, $500 is kind of limiting.

    Update: I wish we could still do dual graphics with APU's, im sure it would have been glitchy as hell, but it would have been neat to test before you turned it off due to the frame rate spikes and frustrations.

    [PCPartPicker part list](https://pcpartpicker.com/list/hsFXP3) / [Price breakdown by merchant](https://pcpartpicker.com/list/hsFXP3/by_merchant/)

    Type|Item|Price
    :----|:----|:----
    **CPU** | [AMD - Athlon X4 950 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ZXgPxr/amd-athlon-x4-950-35ghz-quad-core-processor-ad950xagabbox) | $61.64 @ OutletPC
    **Motherboard** | [ASRock - AB350M Pro4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/dWL7YJ/asrock-ab350m-pro4-micro-atx-am4-motherboard-ab350m-pro4) | $59.99 @ Newegg
    **Memory** | [ADATA - 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/FxgzK8/adata-8gb-2-x-4gb-ddr4-2400-memory-ax4u2400w4g16-drg) | $83.99 @ Newegg
    **Storage** | [ADATA - Ultimate SU650 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/M3RzK8/adata-ultimate-su650-240gb-25-solid-state-drive-asu650ss-240gt-c) | $65.50 @ Newegg
    **Video Card** | [MSI - Radeon RX 560 - 1024 4GB AERO ITX Video Card](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ZKrcCJ/msi-radeon-rx-560-4gb-aero-itx-video-card-rx-560-aero-itx-4g-oc) | $168.88 @ OutletPC
    **Case** | [Rosewill - SRM-01 MicroATX Mini Tower Case](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/wMZ2FT/rosewill-case-srm01) | $18.99 @ Amazon
    **Power Supply** | [Rosewill - 450W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply](https://pcpartpicker.com/product/2XCwrH/rosewill-power-supply-arc450) | $38.89 @ OutletPC
    | *Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts* |
    | **Total** | **$497.88**
    | Generated by [PCPartPicker](http://pcpartpicker.com) 2018-03-28 17:31 EDT-0400 |
  • Dark Lord of Tech
    Overall just bad choices in my opinion , mine was the best overall quality and performance per dollar.
  • g-unit1111
    387420 said:
    537231 said:
    387420 said:
    I get that, and I'm not attacking you personally man (i'm sorry if it came through that way), just voicing my concerns with the choice, then again its been near a month since these builds were drawn up, and I have the benefit of calculating with probably slightly lower prices. Lol, we could have changed out the R3 1200 and R5 2400G for an Athlon x4 950 :D. But honestly that will probably be a little weak, although i am currently using one for my day to day rig (it's really not that bad) because I want to play with one, and I'm still deciding where I want to go from here (I love all of the options we have on AM4 and TR4).
    Yeah true, we all have our opinions. I mean we could sit here and nit pick the nuances of one part choice over the other until dawn. I would personally pick an AM4 rig but after an hour or so playing around on PC Part Picker I just couldn't make it work without sacrificing build quality. In the end I'd rather go for a quality rig with lots of upgrade potential than one that doesn't have that. But that's just my build philosophy.
    Just for giggles I tried to build up something with a 4gb card, and I can just make it work with an Athlon x4 950 and a RX 560 (1024 shaders). You're right though, its not an ideal build, its still lacking in storage, the cpu will slightly hold you back from time to time (although not by much), the gpu could be better (for the current prices its the cheapest decent 4GB card i could find), and the case is meh (although i do like how simple it looks), but eh, it could be worse. Honestly with prices as they currently are, $500 is kind of limiting.


    I've had mid towers, full towers, desktop cases, and just about everythign you can think of. I prefer smaller towers over just about everything else, even though they are a bit more difficult to work in. Though I do like the small form factor builds. I just kind of chose that case at random. I do like it and Thermaltake generally makes a lot of quality cases.

    My thing is I've seen people all the time try to come up with ridiculous builds using $1400 GPUs, and then leave $300 left over for everything else. And that's where you get into trouble. You could go that route, but then like you said you'd be making sacrifices and I generally don't do that. I mean I would love to include a 4GB card and an SSD but in this day and age where everything is digital, you can't just have 240GB of SSD space, that won't get you very far.
  • Barty1884
    I don't think anybody is necessarily disputing the "best overall" aspect BB -- I'm certainly not going back through all the prior entries to disagree.

    That being said, my interpretation is the actual purpose of the rig is priority #1.
    BUT on a performance "per dollar" basis... remember, strictly in the game of Fortnite:
    Your build vs the winning build (G-Units) would perform near identically -- with the G4560 very likely to eek out tiny gains in the 1% and .1%.

    Identical/very marginally "better" Fortnite performance for $483 vs your $498 ie about 3% less.
    So on that basis G-Unit's gets the edge in performance/dollar in Fortnite alone (IMO anyway), which was the entire point of this..
  • Dark Lord of Tech

    ASRock AB350M ^ ...Where is the video output for the other 2 builds which have no GPU.

    :pfff:
  • artk2219
    276663 said:
    ASRock AB350M ^ ...Where is the video output for the other 2 builds which have no GPU.
    :pfff:


    LOL, holy cow, you're right.

    https://www.asrock.com/MB/AMD/AB350M/index.asp