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OCZ Octane 512 GB SSD Review: Meet Indilinx's Everest Controller

OCZ's Octane SSD Taps Indilinx For Performance

We've seen OCZ enjoy a lot of success over the past two generations of utilizing SandForce's technology in its solid-state drives. Successively, the company has pushed performance boundaries in a way that redefined what you could expect from an SSD.

Naturally, as SandForce's launch partner, OCZ was always the first one to enjoy the benefits of a new controller, and the company tended to earn the biggest collection of awards for jumping out of the gate with new controller hardware. Over the years, then, OCZ's Vertex family has acquired quite a collection of accolades.

More similarities than differences...

There's a flip-side to that position, though. In earning itself recognition for its SandForce-based SSDs, OCZ also helps sell its competitors' products based on the same technology.

The uncomfortable truth is that two SandForce-based SSDs of the same capacity, employing the same NAND interface, are going to perform nearly identically. That's something that SandForce itself won't dispute. SSDs that center on SandForce's technology employ a slightly tweaked version of the company's reference firmware. That's what makes an OCZ Vertex 3 equivalent to Corsair's Force GT. Both drive use a second-generation SandForce controller along with synchronous ONFi flash. There are some implementation differences. However, a performance comparison reveals near-identical performance.

OCZ's Octane

Understandably, OCZ is looking to frame itself as a company willing to take big risks in the interest of staying competitive. For that reason, its most recent SATA 6Gb/s-based offering doesn't employ a SandForce controller. Rather, its new SSD, dubbed Octane, leverages technical expertise gained from the company's Indilinx purchase. This is somewhat of a historic SSD because it leverages OCZ's own Everest controller, the newest piece of storage hardware to land in our labs since Samsung sent over its 830-series drive.

Where are we told to expect this drive to compete? It exists in the company's performance series, strategically placed under the Vertex 3 models. However, it's still armed with 6 Gb/s connectivity, smoking-fast read specs, a large data cache, and capacities that span up to 1 TB. Could this be a contender at the very upper end of the SSD segment? We ran across a couple of issues that compel a closer look at our benchmark results. However, we also see lots of potential here. Read on for a thorough analysis of OCZ's first evening out with its own controller hardware.

  • theuniquegamer
    I think in 2 to 3 years we can get a affodable and fast 1tb ssd in market
    Reply
  • theuniquegamer
    Wow CRYSIS 2 reads and writes above 1 gb data per 20minutes
    Reply
  • ksampanna
    theuniquegamerI think in 2 to 3 years we can get a affodable and fast 1tb ssd in market
    Fast yes, affordable no. My guess is atleast 5 years for a 1 TB ssd to be under $100
    Reply
  • EDVINASM
    Still comparing Crysis 2 to everything that moves? I had WD Blue in RAID 0 for quite a while and was relatively happy. Before Christmas however, I have replaced them with just simple, SATA 300 Intel 320 SSD 80Gb. Boy what a difference! No more HDD scratchy sounds, no heat from them, no vibrations, no annoying ticks when idle, silent.. Speed wise PC boots up within 30 sec, and I am only running Intel i3 2100 with no OC. To those who are holding onto HDD I would say unless capacity is the key - sell it off for an SSD. Especially now that HDD prices are skyroketting it is proving easier and easier to do the swap.
    Reply
  • nebun
    ksampannaFast yes, affordable no. My guess is at least 5 years for a 1 TB ssd to be under $100it's so much fun to dream....don't expect prices to drop that much....that's what people people said about CPUs a few years back, yet nothing has changed.... another example is the mid and top end video cards....since manufacturing techniques have improved and have become more efficient one would think that the products would be cheaper....that's not the case....it's called demmand....people demand faster components and will pay a premium price for it, why would manufacturers drop the prices?...they still have to make a profit
    Reply
  • mayankleoboy1
    theuniquegamerI think in 2 to 3 years we can get a affodable and fast 1tb ssd in market

    yeah.
    and in 2 to 3 years we can get a 20 core intel 9999 X edition for $50.
    and gtx990X2 for just $100.
    Reply
  • buzznut
    edvinasmStill comparing Crysis 2 to everything that moves? I had WD Blue in RAID 0 for quite a while and was relatively happy. Before Christmas however, I have replaced them with just simple, SATA 300 Intel 320 SSD 80Gb. Boy what a difference! No more HDD scratchy sounds, no heat from them, no vibrations, no annoying ticks when idle, silent.. Speed wise PC boots up within 30 sec, and I am only running Intel i3 2100 with no OC. To those who are holding onto HDD I would say unless capacity is the key - sell it off for an SSD. Especially now that HDD prices are skyroketting it is proving easier and easier to do the swap.
    And I recommend folks hold onto their current hard drives and get a boot SSD. 80GB may be enough for you, but a lot of us have bigger storage needs. Its gonna take about a year for the hard drive market to recover, so hang on to those mechanical drives.
    Reply
  • drwho1
    theuniquegamerI think in 2 to 3 years we can get a affodable and fast 1tb ssd in market
    mayankleoboy1yeah.and in 2 to 3 years we can get a 20 core intel 9999 X edition for $50.and gtx990X2 for just $100.
    I do believe that 3-5 years from now we will see a huge increase on performance accompanied by a huge drop in price (compare with today's prices and performance)

    Then we will probably have SATA 4 on the market and the "right price/GB/TB" will be on SATA 3 SSD's.

    With that in mind, I have always build my systems a generation "behind" which is always more than "a few" generations of whatever I had built last, I have always double or triple my previous built performance for around the same money invested on it.

    (plus/minus a few new "tricks" that probably were not on the previous built that could raise my budget
    200 dollars or so)

    Is is possible to get an 1TB SSD for around $100-$200 dollars in 3-5 years?
    I believe it will be.
    just don't expect to also be the faster SATA 4, you will have to "compromise" by been a little "behind"
    in speed.








    Reply
  • mikenygmail
    Add "SSD" to the title.
    Reply
  • tetracycloide
    nebunthat's what people people said about CPUs a few years back, yet nothing has changedAMD Athlon 64 4000+ San Diego 2.4GHz circa 2005 - $475.99 inflation adjusted to 2011 ~$548.22
    Intel Core 2 Duo E6850 Conroe 3.0GHz circa 2007 - $279.99 inflation adjusted to 2011 ~$304.10
    Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz circa 2011 - $219.99

    I'm sorry, you were saying?
    Reply