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Rosewill Quark 1000 Power Supply Review

Today we take a look at Rosewill's Quark 1000. In addition to 80 PLUS Platinum efficiency and fully modular cabling, this $200 unit can support multiple GPUs.

Transient Response Tests

Advanced Transient Response Tests

In these tests, we monitored the response of the PSU in two different scenarios. First, a transient load (10A at +12V, 5A at 5V, 5A at 3.3V and 0.5A at 5VSB) was applied to the PSU for 200ms while the PSU was working at 20 percent load. In the second scenario, the PSU was hit by the same transient load while operating at 50 percent load. In both tests, we used our oscilloscope to measure the voltage drops caused by the transient load. The voltages should remain within the ATX specification's regulation limits.

These tests are crucial, as they simulate the transient loads that a PSU is likely to handle (such as booting a RAID array or an instant 100 percent CPU/GPU load). We call these Advanced Transient Response Tests, and they are designed to be very tough to master.   

For details on our transient response testing, please click here.

Advanced Transient Response 20%

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V12.020V11.897V1.02%Pass
5V4.987V4.895V1.84%Pass
3.3V3.324V3.216V3.25%Pass
5VSB4.957V4.882V1.51%Pass

Advanced Transient Response 50%

VoltageBeforeAfterChangePass/Fail
12V11.969V11.878V0.76%Pass
5V4.957V4.868V1.80%Pass
3.3V3.300V3.189V3.36%Pass
5VSB4.915V4.843V1.46%Pass
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Our Advanced Transient Response tests showed that the voltage drops were under control on all rails. However, we would have liked to see smaller deviations on the +12V rail, which handles transient loads constantly inside a real system. The higher-than-usual voltage drops on the 5VSB rail are not serious, since the average deviation was within 1.5 percent.

Here are the oscilloscope screenshots we took during Advanced Transient Response Testing:

Transient Response At 20-Percent Load

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Transient Response At 50-Percent Load

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Turn-On Transient Tests

In the next set of tests, we measured the PSU's response during the PSU's power-on phase.

For the first measurement, we turned off the PSU, dialed in the maximum current the 5VSB can output and then switched on the PSU. In the second test, we dialed the maximum load the +12V rail could handle and started the PSU while it was in standby mode. In the last test, while the PSU was completely switched off (we cut off power or switched off the PSU by flipping its switch), we dialed the maximum load the +12V rail could handle before switching on the PSU from the loader and restoring power. The ATX specification states that recorded spikes on all rails should not exceed 10 percent of their nominal values (+10 percent for 12V is 13.2V, and 5.5V for 5V).    

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We measured a really tiny voltage overshoot at 5VSB and two larger voltage overshoots, but everything was pretty smooth on the other two tests. All in all, the PSU performed well here.

  • ern88
    I don't know of Rosewill is any better then it was a few years ago. I had friends with a rosewill PSU and it baked big time. Maybe they are better now. But I would stick with EVGA or another well known good company!!!
    Reply
  • justaguywithagun
    i wouldnt hesitate to replace my ~7y/o antec TP750 with a nice rosewill capstone unit when the time comes. in fact, thats essentially my plan. would i throw any rosewill unit in my rig/s? no i wouldnt, but every manufacturer i can think of has units that are less than desirable. rosewill has a come a long long way the last few years
    Reply
  • Calculatron
    1000 rules of acquisition?
    Reply
  • Larry Litmanen
    I don't know of Rosewill is any better then it was a few years ago. I had friends with a rosewill PSU and it baked big time. Maybe they are better now. But I would stick with EVGA or another well known good company!!!

    Obviously EVGA has amazing brand name and they deserve it because of their level of service. However as far as i know EVGA does not have any PSU making plants, they simply rebrand a unit made by Seaconic or another OEM. Many companies do that, so you can probably buy exactly the same unit from a different brand.

    I am not sure if Rosewill builds or rebrands, but i had their products and they are not bad, i personally have not had any issues.
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    Several Rosewill PSUs are build by Super Flower, the same OEM that also makes most of EVGA's offerings.
    Reply
  • none12345
    "I don't know of Rosewill is any better then it was a few years ago. I had friends with a rosewill PSU and it baked big time. Maybe they are better now. But I would stick with EVGA or another well known good company!!! "

    I duno if their large ones are as good. But ive had a 550 watt running in this computer for 6.5 years now with no problem. This is the first roswell one i had tried. Thats the longest ive ever stayed on the same power supply.(In the past it was either fry, or had to upgrade the size because of ever increasing component power usage)
    Reply
  • tomtom234
    companies that manufacture a Rosewill psu

    http://www.orionpsudb.com/rosewill
    Reply
  • Aris_Mp
    Like every company that wants to do well into this market Rosewill doesn't rely on only one manufacturer. They had strong ties with Super Flower in the past however they decided to go with other OEMs as well, since SF became so popular and cannot meet the demands of all the companies that want their products.
    Reply
  • Shalmaneser
    Does anyone actually do OCP, OVP, OPP / OLP, OTP, UVP, SCP, and
    NLO? (Something of a rhetorical question), short answer from google is no...

    Also, why is the list graphical? I'd like to have a character list to search through...
    Reply