Skip to main content

BT Confirms Plans for 300Mbps Broadband Later This Year

Back in February of 2012, UK telecoms provider British Telecom announced that it had successfully trialled "FTTP on demand." FTTP, or Fibre to the Premise broadband, is an evolution of BT's FTTC (Fibre to the Cabinet) solution that allows additional fibre to be run on demand to a home or business in an FTTC-enabled area. BT said last year that while FTTP speeds weren't previously possible in FTTC-enabled areas, it had developed a solution that takes advantage of the fibre it had already deployed between the exchange and the street cabinet. At the time, the company said the development meant FTTP could be made available anywhere in BT's fibre footprint and relayed plans to make the service, which is capable of offering speeds of up to 300Mbps, commercially available to all communications providers by the spring of next year.

As you may (or may not) have noticed, we're in the midst of summer at this stage, but BT today provided an update on that ultrafast fibre broadband. Speaking via a press release, British Telecom confirmed that it would "soon" be offering ultrafast 300Mbps FTTP service to customers. Though BT did specify that the service would initially be available withing 50 exchange areas where FTTP infrastructure has been deployed to date, it didn't give any clue as to when "soon" might be. The company's Infinity 300Mbps FTTP service will come with 20Mbps upload speeds and existing FTTP customers can upgrade to the new speeds via the £50 Unlimited package from BT.

BT also announced a new router, the Home Hub 5, for BT Infinity customers. When it launches later this year, it will feature superfast 802.11ac Wi-Fi and 4 GigE ports and an integrated VDSL modem.

  • Shaun o
    Traffic shaping ,an data capping here we come.
    Reply
  • billybobser
    Still can't manage 5Mbps at the moment....
    Reply
  • Nakal
    And I thought my 30/5 was quick.. i wants more!
    Reply
  • mapesdhs
    I just wish for once UK companies would drop the prices of existing
    link speeds, instead of increasing the speed at the same price level
    again and again. Or at least give one the option. I haven't changed
    my package in quite a while, but over time the monthly cost has
    crept up from 76 to almost 100 per month.


    billybobser, I have VM's 20meg setup atm. I get the full
    20Mbit download speed most of the time. Tried grabbing
    an 80MB file from my site just now, 2.3MB/sec sustained.

    Ian.

    Reply
  • someperson123
    I do so loathe the speed reporting discrepency between ISP advertising and internet reporting downloads, where the former is reported in Mb (megabits) to make the number look larger and the latter in MB (megabytes).

    Thusly, Ian's example is prime as it illustrates that an ISP advertised 20 Mbps connection reaches downloads of around 2.5 MB/s. So silly.
    Reply
  • lockhrt999
    "I do so loathe the speed reporting discrepency between ISP advertising and internet reporting downloads, where the former is reported in Mb (megabits) to make the number look larger and the latter in MB (megabytes).

    Thusly, Ian's example is prime as it illustrates that an ISP advertised 20 Mbps connection reaches downloads of around 2.5 MB/s. So silly."

    Well transfer of data has always been measured 'bits per second' basis. It's not a gimmick from ISPs. Same goes for SATA I, II, III speeds, USB etc all are measured into 'bits per seconds'.

    Data storage on the other hand, measured in bytes.
    Reply
  • lockhrt999
    "I do so loathe the speed reporting discrepency between ISP advertising and internet reporting downloads, where the former is reported in Mb (megabits) to make the number look larger and the latter in MB (megabytes).

    Thusly, Ian's example is prime as it illustrates that an ISP advertised 20 Mbps connection reaches downloads of around 2.5 MB/s. So silly."

    Well transfer of data has always been measured 'bits per second' basis. It's not a gimmick from ISPs. Same goes for SATA I, II, III speeds, USB etc all are measured into 'bits per seconds'.

    Data storage on the other hand, measured in bytes.
    Reply
  • goodevil
    Why the hell optic fiber internet has different upload speed from download in UK? Everyone knows optic fiber is not asynchronous service! In Lithuanian optic fiber internet with 100mbps download upload speeds are available for more than 5 years already. No traffic shaping too.
    Reply
  • xelliz
    I don't need 300Mb broadband, I just need for American companies to actually provide what we are paying for. This means that companies like AT&T need to give us appropriate speeds for the money. 6 Mb internet for $46 a month is BS.
    Reply
  • shahrooz
    people stop moaning I pay 30$ for a 768kbps and the my ping from yahoo is 500ms. I'm getting mad sometimes people speak in my head about my connection. and you are b*tching because your 20Mbps gets down to 15Mbps sometimes...
    Reply