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Network Storage: Three NAS Units Rounded Up

Test Environment

As usual, we skip installation of Jumbo Frames in our testing because, although they enable higher data-transfer rates, they can also cause problems due to an absence of standards governing their implementation. Otherwise, we ran benchmarks using our standard reference platform. The following table provide details about hardware components involved.

System Hardware
Intel PlatformAsus P5E3 Deluxe, Rev.1.03G
Intel X38, BIOS: 0810 (02/11/2007)
CPUIntel Core 2 Duo E6750 (65 nm Conroe core) @2.26 GHz
RAM2x 1024MB Crucial Ballistix DDR3-1600
eSATA-ControllerJMicron JMB363
System Hard DiskSeagate Barracuda 7200.9, 160 GB
7,200 RPM, SATA/300, 8 MB Cache
Test Hard DiskSamsung Spinpoint HD321KJ, 320 GB
7,200 RPM, SATA/300, 16 MB Cache
DVD-ROMSamsung SH-D163A , SATA150
Graphics CardGigabyte Radeon HD 3850 GV-RX385512H
GPU: 670 MHz
RAM: 512 MB DDR3 (830 MHz, 256 Bit)
Network InterfaceMarvell Yukon 88E8056 PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet Controller
Sound CardIntegrated
Power SupplyCoolermaster RS-850-EMBA, ATX 12V V2.2, 850 W
System Software & Drivers
OSWindows Vista Enterprise SP1
DirectX 10DirectX 10 (Vista-Standard)
DirectX 9Version: April 2007
Graphics DriversAMD Radeon Version 7.12
Network Drivers9.0.32.3 (Vista-Standard)
Intel Chipset DriverVersion 6.9.1.1001 (20/02/2008)
JMicron Chipset DriverVersion 1.17.15.0 (24/03/2007)

Intel NAS Performance Toolkit

We used the Intel NAS Performance Toolkit. You'll find a write-up of these benchmarks in our recent story on Hacking the HP EX470/475 MediaSmart Servers, where the individual tests and their results are discussed.

  • chaugh
    TYPO!!!

    and you see that heritage in the TS-590 Pro.

    What's a TS-590?
    Reply
  • cknobman
    If you want something simple to share data at home I cant figure out why anyone would buy a cheap NAS that gives less than 15 mbps or something outrageous costing over $700. Why not build your own using low power cpu that would perform much better than the cheap NAS devices and still come in hundreds of dollars less than the overpriced NAS devices?
    Reply
  • dje007
    I have a Qnap TS-639 and love it
    Reply
  • yourhighness
    cknobmanIf you want something simple to share data at home I cant figure out why anyone would buy a cheap NAS that gives less than 15 mbps or something outrageous costing over $700. Why not build your own using low power cpu that would perform much better than the cheap NAS devices and still come in hundreds of dollars less than the overpriced NAS devices?
    THIS
    Reply
  • yourhighness
    More on this Topic....?

    Hitting the link for the last page just gives me a blank pop-up box....

    Using Chrome.
    Reply
  • yourhighness
    yourhighnessMore on this Topic....?Hitting the link for the last page just gives me a blank pop-up box....Using Chrome.Grabbing the link from the drop down works fine, but from the conclusion page going to the next page is broken.
    Reply
  • theJ
    yourhighnessMore on this Topic....?Hitting the link for the last page just gives me a blank pop-up box....Using Chrome.
    That's all it is. More ads so they can pay the bills.
    Reply
  • theJ
    Nevermind, read the question wrong. Need edit button.
    Reply
  • If you want to build your own rock-solid RAID NAS, and do so with cheap old hardware, check out my guide on building a Linux RAID-5 NAS. I wrote this guide so even someone who has never worked with Linux before can get it up and running, and maintain it, very easily! Hope this helps someone out there!
    Go to my site at: http://cobraftp.serveftp.com and click on Linux.. then at the top is the PDF, which is labeled "Linux RAID-5 How-to Guide"
    Reply
  • how did you exclude the new Readynas NVX? seems kinda silly without that leader in both functionality and performance involved
    Reply