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Digital Storm Intros Ultra-thin "Future-Proof" Rig

By - Source: Digital Storm Email | B 37 comments

Is this the world's thinnest PC gaming powerhouse? You be the judge.

Digital Storm is currently promoting what it considers to be the world's thinnest, most powerful and future-proof gaming PC. It's simply called Bolt, standing 14-inches tall (front) and measuring 3.6-inches wide. The company says it's been engineered from scratch to effectively dissipate heat, allowing it to house the latest and fastest components on the market in a small form factor.

"When conceptualizing the Bolt, Digital Storm engineers found no chassis on the market that met their design criteria, so they designed their own brand new chassis from the ground up. Every aspect of the Bolt from: cooling, performance, and upgradability were ingeniously designed to the highest possible standards," the company said on Tuesday.

So what makes it future-proof? Digital Storm says it's the power supply coupled with plenty of room for large video cards and additional storage despite its small footprint. As seen in the base specs below, Bolt arrives in four customizable flavors ranging from $999 to $1949 starting prices:

LEVEL 1
Designed for gamers on a tight budget looking for both performance and value
Starting price: $999
CPU: Intel Core i3 2100
RAM: 8 GB DDR3 1333 MHz
GPU: Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti 2 GB
Storage: 1 TB 7200RPM
Motherboard: Asus P8H77-1
Optical Drive: Slim 8X DVD-RW
Power Supply: 500W
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium

LEVEL 2
Designed for gamers on a medium budget looking for both performance and value
Starting price: $1,249
CPU: Intel Core i5 3570K
RAM: 8 GB DDR3 1600 MHz
GPU: Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 2 GB
Storage: 1 TB 7200RPM
Motherboard: Asus P8H77-1
Optical Drive: Slim 8X DVD-RW
Power Supply: 500W
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium

LEVEL 3
Designed for gamers with a significant budget looking for cutting-edge performance
Starting price: $1,599
CPU: Intel Core i5 3570K
RAM: 8 GB DDR3 1600 MHz
GPU: Nvidia GeForce GTX 660 Ti 2 GB
Storage: 60 GB SSD, 1 TB 7200RPM HDD
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77N-WIFI
Optical Drive: Slim 8X DVD-RW
Power Supply: 500W
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium

LEVEL 4
Designed for gamers looking for the ultimate high performance machine
Starting price: $1,949
CPU: Intel Core i7 3770K
RAM: 16 GB DDR3 1600 MHz
GPU: Nvidia GeForce GTX 680 2 GB
Storage: 120 GB SSD, 1 TB 7200RPM HDD
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-I Deluxe
Optical Drive: Slim 8X DVD-RW
Power Supply: 500W
OS: Windows 7 Home Premium

Product images show that the Bolt PC measures 13.3-inches at the back, 14-inches at the front, and 13.4-inches deep. While most of the connections reside on the back, the front panel appears to play host to the optical drive and an illuminated Bolt logo while audio jacks and several USB 2.0 / 3.0 ports are tucked away along the front panel's side.

"No other thin form factor tower houses as much power as Bolt because no other system can handle the type of bleeding edge hardware and overclocking that Bolt does," the company said. "Bolt's high performance CPU cooling solution, with five copper heat pipes, unlocks even more gaming performance with processor overclocks of up to 4.6 GHz with Intel’s i7 3770K CPU. Bolt also supports up to 3 hard drives: 2 SSDs and 1 mechanical for incredible storage flexibility."

For more information about the Bolt gaming desktop, head here.

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Top Comments
  • 10 Hide
    amuffin , October 24, 2012 6:34 AM
    Well, to be fair. There is no such thing as future proofing in the PC industry. :) 
Other Comments
  • -2 Hide
    maigo , October 24, 2012 5:43 AM
    Quote:
    500w psu

    She doesn't have enough power, captain!
  • 6 Hide
    mightymaxio , October 24, 2012 5:44 AM
    Nice looking rig, would be pretty awesome to take that in a backpack to LAN parties at school instead of carting the big ol tower 10 blocks down campus and all the weird looks people give you lol.
  • 9 Hide
    amuffin , October 24, 2012 6:02 AM
    maigoShe doesn't have enough power, captain!

    500W should be plenty, that is assuming DS used a good PSU in there.

    A system with a 3770K and 680 should only draw around 250-300W under normal circumstances.
  • 2 Hide
    frank the tank , October 24, 2012 6:03 AM
    Is that a 1u server PSU I see in there? This machine is going to be loud.
    Falcon Northwest made a rig like this called the "tiki" and it is claimed to be quiet and they even crammed
    A water cooler in its tiny case too. Then again the tiki is way more expensive.

    Would be great for a LAN party but I would rather build an sff build with a silver stone sg07 that is also upgradeable and can fit a water cooler as well. It also has a 600 watt PSU in it too.
  • 0 Hide
    merikafyeah , October 24, 2012 6:04 AM
    Looks like Falcon Northwest's Tiki has some serious competition!
  • 6 Hide
    dudewitbow , October 24, 2012 6:05 AM
    Digital Storm Bolt: 3.6 inches wide, 14 inches tall 1000$ build uses an i3-2100 and a Gtx 650 ti
    Alienware x51: 3.74 inches wide, 13.5 inches tall(on the taller side) 1050$ build uses an i5-3330 and Gtx 660


    and i though alienware was overpriced.
  • 6 Hide
    bavman , October 24, 2012 6:09 AM
    Overpriced as hell!!! You can build these yourself for literally half the price.
  • 8 Hide
    lunyone , October 24, 2012 6:10 AM
    Quote:
    Designed for gamers on a tight budget looking for both performance and value
    Starting price: $999
    CPU: Intel Core i3 2100
    RAM: 8 GB DDR3 1333 MHz
    GPU: Nvidia GeForce GTX 650 Ti 2 GB
    Storage: 1 TB 7200RPM
    Motherboard: Asus P8H77-1
    Optical Drive: Slim 8X DVD-RW
    Power Supply: 500W
    OS: Windows 7 Home Premium

    So to break it down:
    CPU - $125
    RAM - $40
    GPU - $175
    HD - $70
    Mobo - $100
    DVD Burner - $30
    PSU - $60
    Case - $100
    OS - $80

    Sooo for about $780 shipped from Newegg you can have the "Gamers on a tight budget" PC!! Of coarse I gave the case a $100 value (not sure if it's worth that or not) and the PSU a $60 value too. But I can tell you that I would rather spend more $ on the GPU than what they have allowed for a $1k gaming system.
  • 2 Hide
    dudewitbow , October 24, 2012 6:11 AM
    bavmanOverpriced as hell!!! You can build these yourself for literally half the price.

    its price is aesthetics and size. though its still overpriced if you compare it to Alienware(Dell) slim tower comparison. by a large margin.
  • 3 Hide
    lunyone , October 24, 2012 6:13 AM
    Also forgot to mention that the Asus P8H77-1 Mobo doesn't OC either, so how is this "future-proof"???
  • 2 Hide
    ojas , October 24, 2012 6:14 AM
    A tad overpriced? i3-2100 +DDR3-1333 for $999?
  • 3 Hide
    bavman , October 24, 2012 6:16 AM
    dudewitbowits price is aesthetics and size. though its still overpriced if you compare it to Alienware(Dell) slim tower comparison. by a large margin.


    Seriously if I wanted to dish out large amounts of money for aesthetics i'd just buy a mac and call it a day. At least apple has good customer service.

    This company really pisses me off. They're selling PNY GTX 480s in their "parts upgrade" section of the website for $400.
  • 4 Hide
    freggo , October 24, 2012 6:23 AM
    Maybe it's just me, but 'small' is not a selling factor to me for a performance PC.
    Bigger case means I can put more stuff in there, or have plenty of room to let the chips breathe some cool air.

    And as for their pricing, have they had a look at the economy lately?
    People do not have any cash to throw away but must count every hard earned penny; Apple users are obviously excluded :-)

  • 1 Hide
    dudewitbow , October 24, 2012 6:26 AM
    freggoMaybe it's just me, but 'small' is not a selling factor to me for a performance PC.Bigger case means I can put more stuff in there, or have plenty of room to let the chips breathe some cool air.And as for their pricing, have they had a look at the economy lately?People do not have any cash to throw away but must count every hard earned penny; Apple users are obviously excluded :-)

    Small is aimed at Lan Party players. even so, I would rather use something with handles like a bitfenix prodigy mini itx kind of build over paying more for something like this.
  • 10 Hide
    amuffin , October 24, 2012 6:34 AM
    Well, to be fair. There is no such thing as future proofing in the PC industry. :) 
  • 1 Hide
    amdfangirl , October 24, 2012 7:00 AM
    Sure there is. The rig never built is the rig that will never be outdated. :) 

    Unfortunately companies can't sell that...

    (Or can they...)
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , October 24, 2012 7:10 AM
    not that impressed with the lay out, when i built mine in CAD i was able to fit an extra 2 hard drives in a box the same size
  • 3 Hide
    cats_Paw , October 24, 2012 7:17 AM
    Overpriced. Future Proof? There is no such thing. PSU: maybe ok for now, but no upgradability. And finally, slim tower... ok looks nice, but means less space more heat inside...

    I guess it aint my brand of beer.
  • -1 Hide
    neiroatopelcc , October 24, 2012 8:37 AM
    amuffin500W should be plenty, that is assuming DS used a good PSU in there. A system with a 3770K and 680 should only draw around 250-300W under normal circumstances.


    I'm not convinced. I've meassured a 765W power draw at full load on my system in the past. That had a corsair 620W psu, so after efficiency was considered, I had very little room left.
    And that was with a highend and a midrange card in crossfire only. Not two highend cards, which by my standard is the minimum for anything future proof.
    A system isn't future proof if it can't handle something I had 3 years ago. (i7-920, 4870x2+4870)
  • 1 Hide
    captainblacko , October 24, 2012 8:42 AM
    looks ugly.
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