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Intel Receives SuperSpeed USB 3.0 Certification

By - Source: Intel | B 23 comments

Today, USB-IF announced that the upcoming Intel 7 Series Chipset and Intel C216 Chipset Family has achieved SuperSpeed USB Certification.

As previously discussed in April, Intel has officially received SuperSpeed USB Certification for its upcoming Intel 7 Series Chipset Family for client PCs and Intel C216 Chipset for servers from the USB Implementers Forum. These chipsets will provide up to 4 integrated USB 3.0 ports. USB 3.0 support will enable faster transfer rates for consumers connecting devices to their PC, with compatible USB 3.0 devices.

“SuperSpeed USB certification of our Intel 7 Series Chipset and Intel C216 Chipset Family helps ensure interoperability and backward compatibility within the broad USB ecosystem,” said Ahmad Zaidi, General Manager, Intel Corporation Chipset and SoC IP Group. “The Intel 7 Series Chipset and Intel C216 Chipset Family offers OEMs and consumers many exciting features, and Intel is excited to integrate SuperSpeed USB technology into our upcoming chipsets.”

In related news, the USB-IF also revealed a new standard that is capable of carrying powered audio and video.

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  • 15 Hide
    phatbuddha79 , December 14, 2011 5:21 AM
    I thought they didn't like USB so much since they're trying to push their own thunderbolt standard...
  • 12 Hide
    ta152h , December 14, 2011 5:16 AM
    It's hard not to wonder why it took them so long, considering they pushed pretty aggressively for the USB 3.0 standard.
Other Comments
  • 12 Hide
    ta152h , December 14, 2011 5:16 AM
    It's hard not to wonder why it took them so long, considering they pushed pretty aggressively for the USB 3.0 standard.
  • 15 Hide
    phatbuddha79 , December 14, 2011 5:21 AM
    I thought they didn't like USB so much since they're trying to push their own thunderbolt standard...
  • 4 Hide
    buzznut , December 14, 2011 5:23 AM
    Actually, I think Intel was more concerned with making the thunderbolt USB spec popular. I would say they were opposed to USB 3.0 thinking their technology was superior. That would account for feet dragging on Intel's part. Unless this is Thunderbolt were talking about and Intel renamed it...
  • 4 Hide
    nikorr , December 14, 2011 7:48 AM
    At last....
  • 6 Hide
    archange , December 14, 2011 7:54 AM
    Intel last to the table :p 
    TB is coming along slower than predicted. Which is hardly a surprise.
  • 2 Hide
    SteelCity1981 , December 14, 2011 9:40 AM
    Welcome to 2009 Intel. It's about time, it took you 3 years to finally get on board.
  • 6 Hide
    Friis , December 14, 2011 9:56 AM
    isn't going from thunderbolt to USB 3.0 a downgrade?
  • -4 Hide
    chiefbox , December 14, 2011 10:08 AM
    USB 3.0 is not TB - 2 different technologies. Apple was behind the TB idea, it's not by coincidence Apple was the 1st to productize TB on their laptops.
  • 0 Hide
    chiefbox , December 14, 2011 10:15 AM
    Well that depends... Both have high data throughput but serve 2 different functions and have different objectives.
    Friisisn't going from thunderbolt to USB 3.0 a downgrade?

  • 3 Hide
    belardo , December 14, 2011 11:30 AM
    No, Intel developed Thunderbolt - which was first used in Apple's computers. Its intel technology, just as much as the CPU and chipsets in the Mac notebooks and desktops.

    Its not the same as USB, quite different - both standards have their pros and cons. TB uses a daisy chain system, hence - you get only 1 TB port, vs 3~7 USB ports.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , December 14, 2011 11:48 AM
    Welcome to the party Intel, now finally we will see the shift to usb 3 products at reasonable prices.
  • 0 Hide
    gh0st , December 14, 2011 12:12 PM
    "I thought they didn't like USB so much since they're trying to push their own thunderbolt standard..."

    They are ..but ironically USB is part their baby too!..
  • 6 Hide
    ahnilated , December 14, 2011 12:29 PM
    But can it go to plaid ?
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , December 14, 2011 12:34 PM
    I am shaking my head at the information in these comments >_>
    Intel made Lightpeak, which used photonics to transfer data. Intel said they had to transition to copper (renames it Thunderbolt) because the costs were still prohibitive.
    USB also daisy-chains.
    It's hard to say i it's a downgrade because they are two separate connections serving different areas.
    My opinion is that Intel did take way too long for USB 3, not sure why they did, but the first USB3 products out were at the end of 2009... and they had the specs back in 2008. 3 Years and we are finally seeing something from Intel.
  • 2 Hide
    NightLight , December 14, 2011 12:46 PM
    i love how usb 3 hits the fysical speed limit of (older) harddrives :) 
  • 0 Hide
    jimmy-bee , December 14, 2011 1:06 PM
    About Time
  • 2 Hide
    jimmy-bee , December 14, 2011 1:07 PM
    Friisisn't going from thunderbolt to USB 3.0 a downgrade?

    Yes but there almost everything is USB and that is not going to change soon. Kind of like MP3 or .jpg
  • 0 Hide
    jimmy-bee , December 14, 2011 1:08 PM
    ahnilatedBut can it go to plaid ?

    LOL, that was a good movie.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , December 14, 2011 2:18 PM
    USB is not that big of a deal. I've been using a USB external drive and it is still slow as a dog. USB 3 is NOT eSATA. The bus resets too so it isn't something you can use as an enterprise port. It is basically useful for thumb drives, microcards, and the external drives you use for temporary storage. Lightpeak has a million more applications. Intel championed both interfaces as well as just about every other interface on your computer (PCI, SATA, etc.). I think Lightpeak is just another way to get some serious money from licensing fees before opening it up. Did Intel slowplay USB3 adoption for Lightpeak? Maybe... since Lightpeak can be used for the same uses, but lightpeak's bandwidth forces you to use PCI lanes. Until they change the core logic and come up with ways to improve overall system bus speed while still cutting power, you're not going to see a lot of lightpeak and maybe Intel finally realized that and bit the bullet on supporting USB3. Lightpeak may very well take over for USB3 in a few years when the motherboard logic fully supports it.
  • 1 Hide
    LuckyDucky7 , December 14, 2011 4:44 PM
    @IvyBridgeMan

    So... where's Thunderbolt/Light Peak? Aside from Apple (which isn't exactly high-performance technology) and the Sony Vaio Z, I haven't seen it anywhere. Because it isn't anywhere.

    I can't argue that USB 3.0 is still not fast enough (though that's more the fault of drivers and hardware on the other end and would be just as slow with Thunderbolt in the case of external drives).

    Though USB 3.0 also forces you to use PCI-E lanes, just like Lightpeak does, though it only eats up one per port while Light Peak eats up 4. Intel's mainstream chipsets have a real problem with this (I remember Gigabyte's old 1155 boards couldn't provide enough bandwidth for USB 3.0 and SATA 6GB/s at the same time) though their high-end stuff doesn't.

    Lightpeak's also really expensive. Cables for them cost quite a bit (I'll guess that their cost to make's about 15 bucks since Apple sells them for 50) not to mention the circuitry inside the device that has to be redesigned for that protocol (since it is, in essence, a PCI-Express device in itself and would have to include a SATA controller itself if it was any sort of drive (your micro SD card reader just got a lot bigger).
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