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SuperTalent Unveils USB 3.0 RamDisk Device

By - Source: TechPowerUp | B 17 comments

Super Talent has released a USB 3.0-based RamDisk, which uses the system's free memory to achieve very high transfer rates.

Super Talent has released a new, rather interesting device. The device is called the Ram Disk USB. It is a USB 3.0 drive that is said to feature read speeds of up to 4041 MB/s and write speeds of up to 5388 MB/s.

The company didn't disclose exactly how the drive accomplishes this over a USB 3.0 interface, though we imagine that it is simply a USB 3.0 stick with RamDisk software aboard, which loads data to the system's free memory for super-fast performance. All the data would still have to be written back to the drive itself, though, and because USB 3.0 is limited to 5.0 Gb/s (625 MB/s), we imagine that the high transfer rates are only short term and not sustainable for large quantities of data. 

"We are excited to release the RamDisk USB. This product can improve the productivity of those who work with large files and programs by harnessing the power of their system's RAM to deliver transfer speeds of over 4,000 MB/s. The Ram Disk is as portable as a regular USB, giving the user the freedom to take their work anywhere. The Ram Disk provides the power of increased productivity through its incredible speed abilities, which can be many times faster than a SSD. This drive is especially suited for creative professionals. The Ram Disk is an ideal drive for anyone seeking a speedy drive with great performance," said Abraham Ma, CEO of Super Talent Technology.

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  • 0 Hide
    superman21 , June 21, 2013 6:54 AM
    Maybe my math is a little off today, but I'm pretty sure 5.0 GB/s is not the same as 625 MB/s......
  • -1 Hide
    vittau , June 21, 2013 7:06 AM
    So instead of having the OS transfer the files as usual, let's use a middleware to fake a super fast transfer and then transfer it slowly anyway. Genius!
  • 0 Hide
    gnarr , June 21, 2013 7:20 AM
    You are right, 5 GB/s are not the same as 625 MB/s, but 5 Gb/s are the same as 625 MB/s .
  • 0 Hide
    gnarr , June 21, 2013 7:36 AM
    You are right, 5 GB/s are not the same as 625 MB/s, but 5 Gb/s are the same as 625 MB/s .
  • 0 Hide
    warezme , June 21, 2013 7:46 AM
    If you have enough RAM on your system, it would be faster to create a RAM disk off system memory and just place your system cache on it, no USB3 bus limitation. This idea has been around for decades.
  • 0 Hide
    warezme , June 21, 2013 7:49 AM
    to add to that..., or just get a fast SSD.
  • 0 Hide
    chumly , June 21, 2013 8:01 AM
    32, 64, 128, 256, 512

    5120/8 = 640

    I don't understand why humanity is still in Base 10. We should switch to 8. :)  Maybe when Skynet gets here....
  • 0 Hide
    nukemaster , June 21, 2013 8:01 AM
    Quote:
    Maybe my math is a little off today, but I'm pretty sure 5.0 GB/s is not the same as 625 MB/s......

    8 megabits = 1 megabyte
    so

    5000(assuming they use the base 10 giga like they seem to now) megabits = 625 megabytes.

    If they are still using 1024(they way that things have always been in the past) it would be 640 megabytes.

    Everyone seems to do it differently, just like how ALL HDD makers use base 10 1000megabytes = 1gigabyte vs 1024(what I call the real way).
  • 0 Hide
    azgard , June 21, 2013 8:02 AM
    Not really sure how this is effective or where they even get those numbers, as 625 MB/s is wrong too, sustained transfer rates would top out at 512 MB/s with no other devices on the bus. This is also ignoring the fact that USB is a horrible way to implement whatever this is with all of the cpu overhead required to run the USB device in the first place. This thing claims to be a ramdisk using system ram....from a usb port really confusing.
  • 0 Hide
    superman21 , June 21, 2013 8:41 AM
    Quote:
    Quote:
    Maybe my math is a little off today, but I'm pretty sure 5.0 GB/s is not the same as 625 MB/s......

    8 megabits = 1 megabyte
    so

    5000(assuming they use the base 10 giga like they seem to now) megabits = 625 megabytes.

    If they are still using 1024(they way that things have always been in the past) it would be 640 megabytes.

    Everyone seems to do it differently, just like how ALL HDD makers use base 10 1000megabytes = 1gigabyte vs 1024(what I call the real way).


    I know how it works. The original line read GB/s and MB/s, which is incorrect. Capitalization matters with this sort of stuff.
  • 0 Hide
    Lekko , June 21, 2013 9:23 AM
    The only thing I can see this actually speeding up would be transferring a massive number of small files. On USB 3.0 I always notice write speeds dropping massively when writing a cluster of smaller files. If it can create an image on RAM and then transfer them all in bulk, much like a .zip file, then you would at lest get full write speed out of it for the entirety of the transfer.
  • 0 Hide
    sna , June 21, 2013 4:08 PM
    why not a thunderbolt version and be done with it ?
  • 0 Hide
    nukemaster , June 21, 2013 5:25 PM
    Quote:
    why not a thunderbolt version and be done with it ?

    At current, more systems have a USB 3.0 port than a thunderbolt port.
  • 0 Hide
    apache_lives , June 21, 2013 6:13 PM
    USB drives are for quick transferring and removing, if this uses RAM as a fake high speed transfer while its not actually transferred to the device it is USELESS

    Theres an easy way to mimic this on ANY device - device manager change the profile to high performance rather then quick removal - Windows will then use the ram like this device suggests it will do to "boost" transfer speeds

    This is infact all BS because the devices can only read/write at a specific rate, and will always take just as long no matter what you do

    The problem is customers/end users will just remove the device mid way through transfers thinking there done and corrupt the files or leave things incomplete (aka its not idiot proof)

    Other problems - these devices are usually used by "limited" users - most computers there transferring it to/from will have the OS secured/limited (schools university workplaces etc) so your unable to install applications/drivers to allow the speeds/device in the first place (why otherwise would you own a external storage device)

    This device is useless
  • 0 Hide
    photonboy , June 21, 2013 8:14 PM
    5Gb/s equals 625MB/s

    *Yes this is CORRECT.
    That's 5 giga-bits, not giga-bytes. So it's 5000MB/8/s = 625MB/s

    (Gb is Gigabits. GB is GigaBytes)
  • 0 Hide
    The_Trutherizer , June 24, 2013 2:41 AM
    Nice form factor,and it is really good that it is mobile, but the general idea is so old that I'm surprised it's not standard on all motherboards to have fast memory directly on the motherboard pcb dedicated to this type of task by now.
  • 0 Hide
    The_Trutherizer , June 24, 2013 2:43 AM
    Quote:
    32, 64, 128, 256, 512

    5120/8 = 640

    I don't understand why humanity is still in Base 10. We should switch to 8. :)  Maybe when Skynet gets here....


    computers use base2 :p