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Japanese K Supercomputer Smashes 10 Petaflop Barrier

By - Source: Riken | B 62 comments

The Riken Advanced Institute for Computational Science said that its K Computer, cuirrently listed as the world's fastest supercomputer, has become the first system of its kind to break through the 10 Petaflop/s (PFlops) barrier.

K Computer claimed the top position on the Top 500 list back in June with a peak performance of 8.8 PFlops, which was achieved with 68,544 8-core Spark VIIIfx processors. The updated system includes 88,128 CPUs in 864 racks and scored a LINPACK benchmark result of 10.51 PFlops, which makes it the world's first known supercomputer to exceed the 10 PFlops barrier.

10 Pflops translates to 10 quadrillion floating point operations per second, which means that all 7 billion people in the world would need about 16.5 days to achieve the same number of calculations that K does in 1 second - if we assume that those 7 billion people can post one calculation result every second.

It is unclear how much power this computer system consumes, but if we consider the fact that the 8.8 PFlops system was rated at 9.9 MW, we can safely assume that this updated system will consume close to 13 MW.

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently said that it will be completing its Titan supercomputer, which is estimated to hit a performance of 20 PFlops in late 2012 or early 2013. Titan will integrate 18,688 16-core Opteron processors as well as 7000 to 18,000 Nvidia Kepler GPUs. Another 20 PFlops supercomputer will be Sequoia, a BlueGene/Q-based system that will integrate about 100,000 16-core PowerPC A2 processors, which will go online sometime in 2012 at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

The next milestone will be the 100 PFlops mark, which IBM recently mentioned in a patent filing. IBM's proposed BlueGene/Q system will include 524,288 16-core PowerPC A2 processors with a total core count of nearly 8.4 million. IBM estimates that this system can deliver up to 107 PFlops at a power consumption of about 15.7 MW.

Scientists believe that the first Exascale supercomputer will be possible by about 2020.

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Top Comments
  • 25 Hide
    Homeboy2 , November 5, 2011 1:04 AM
    PyreeGreat! Closer to singularity. I am so going to upload my mind.

    You could do that with a USB stick
  • 22 Hide
    lunaticwoda , November 5, 2011 1:07 AM
    ^troll
  • 20 Hide
    Pyree , November 5, 2011 1:02 AM
    Great! Closer to singularity. I am so going to upload my mind.
Other Comments
  • 20 Hide
    Pyree , November 5, 2011 1:02 AM
    Great! Closer to singularity. I am so going to upload my mind.
  • 25 Hide
    Homeboy2 , November 5, 2011 1:04 AM
    PyreeGreat! Closer to singularity. I am so going to upload my mind.

    You could do that with a USB stick
  • 22 Hide
    lunaticwoda , November 5, 2011 1:07 AM
    ^troll
  • 2 Hide
    tanjo , November 5, 2011 1:19 AM
    Does that mean that Sequoia will only need 3 MW of electricity to run?
  • 19 Hide
    joytech22 , November 5, 2011 1:21 AM
    Homeboy2You could do that with a USB stick


    If that USB stick happened to be a few terabytes/petabytes so it could store the individual location of each cell as well as each state that cell is in at the time of backup, as well as electrical signals also in progress during the time of that backup and the interconnects between each cell..

    The 3D location of each cell must be kept as well so that would need to be 100% accurate the amount of digits needed to accurately store the location would be like 24k integers long because of scale.

    Blah blah blah..

    I have no idea what I'm talking about lol
  • 16 Hide
    alvinyang , November 5, 2011 1:28 AM
    That isn't the future. You can upload your every thought now into our super server.

    By Facebook.com
  • 8 Hide
    julianbautista87 , November 5, 2011 1:31 AM
    can I watch porn with that computer?
  • 3 Hide
    nebun , November 5, 2011 1:44 AM
    now that's a very clean looking server room....nice very nice
  • 7 Hide
    viometrix , November 5, 2011 1:50 AM
    will it be able to run GTA IV smoothly?
  • 2 Hide
    FloKid , November 5, 2011 2:05 AM
    I bet the group in the picture can do a little more than a few PTFlops as well.
  • 3 Hide
    dreamer77dd , November 5, 2011 2:15 AM
    Now you take that computer and make a awesome computer game. A.I. would be mind blowing. Play with are emotions. hmmm The computer learns from what people do in the game making the A.I. even smarter. uh oh. hmmm
  • 4 Hide
    Thunderfox , November 5, 2011 2:27 AM
    When you need thousands of processors and god knows how many separate banks of memory and how much power it uses, is it really meaningful to call it a single computer?

    Any load that could make use of it would have to be highly threaded, so much so that I'm sure with enough separate machines distributing the work the same or greater performance could be achieved. The fact that this 'computer' does it all in one place seems kind of irrelevant.

    tl;dr Call me when you can do this on a single chip.
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