In Pictures: Iconic Machines From Computing History

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  • CheesyHotDogPuff
    Could you give up on this slideshow thing already? Please?
    24
  • mayankleoboy1
    Hate this slideshow interface.
    16
  • vaughn2k
    Just need to improve the slide show, though..
    11
  • Other Comments
  • CheesyHotDogPuff
    Could you give up on this slideshow thing already? Please?
    24
  • mcd023
    base 12 counting system, huh.
    8
  • dudemcduderson
    I actually like the slide show thing, keep it up Tom's! In the modern era I feel like the Yoga or Surface Pro should have at least made the list because they run full featured x86 OSes unlike the iPad.
    -1
  • mayankleoboy1
    Hate this slideshow interface.
    16
  • vaughn2k
    Just need to improve the slide show, though..
    11
  • belardo
    Imagine what would have happened if Steve Jobs never saw the GUI computer at Xerox?
    The Amiga computer was in development before the Mac was released to the public. It's still amazing that the apple II sold as well as it did considering the C=64 was so much cheaper yet better.
    6
  • PapaCrazy
    34/35 is not a computer, its the anti-computer. And 35/35 appears blank... a bad omen, or just spooky? Either way, it's also anti-climactic. And this slideshow thing is demeaning for some reason. Makes me feel like I'm in nerd kindergarten.
    1
  • Ioannis Doukakis
    I believe that you must include two more computers:
    a) Epson HX-20, the first actual notebook with battery
    b) ZX-Spectrum one of the most popular personal computers
    5
  • Spinoza1
    You also forgot the first fully programmable computer, the Zuse Z3 from 1941:
    http://www.humanismus.com/_/Konrad_Zuse_files/Munich%20248.jpg
    4
  • varun706
    Very enlightening, but computers featuring discreet GPUs were absent. And the whole slideshow system is crap..

    Tom's please get over it.
    1
  • C12Friedman
    My period of personal computing began in the late 70's and I see some of those machines I used here and can't help but wonder... How could I have enjoyed using those machines... so limited, lol
    I'm not a fan of the slideshow but it could be worse so I'm okay with it
    0
  • blads
    What about an entry about the storage-less Net-tops, that were supposed to become the next big thing in business computing back in the late 90's (I believe it was)...?
    0
  • Spinoza1
    Also, amazingly, you forgot to include the Atari ST, which competed with, and was in many ways better, than the Amiga. It's certainly a more significant computer than the PS/2.
    1
  • christop
    Very cool!!
    0
  • morpheas768
    PapaCrazy34/35 is not a computer, its the anti-computer. And 35/35 appears blank... a bad omen, or just spooky? Either way, it's also anti-climactic. And this slideshow thing is demeaning for some reason. Makes me feel like I'm in nerd kindergarten.

    Although I do agree with you, partially, the slideshow type of article makes separating each item better than a proper article would.

    Also, 35/35 isnt meant to be a place for another computer in the article. Tom's always leaves a blank page at the end, in order to link you to other slideshow articles.
    0
  • Uberschall
    You missed one device which was hugely-popular with journalists during the '80s: the Tandy Model 100. Radio Shack sold several million units, and it was around for many years until the advent of small full-featured laptops.
    4
  • Uberschall
    You missed one device which was hugely-popular with journalists during the '80s: the Tandy Model 100. Radio Shack sold several million units, and it was around for many years until the advent of small full-featured laptops.
    3
  • beetlejuicegr
    "The original PC, the IBM 5150, used an Intel 8088 processor running at 4.77 MHz, two 5.25” diskette drives, and either 16 or 64 KB of RAM. BASIC was its programming language, and PC-DOS its operating system."
    MY IBM PC had 256Kb ram!
    0
  • maxinexus
    Remember 5.25" floppy and monochromatic screens? Childhood well spend I tell ya.
    I also remember for the first time opening my PC tower and cleaning dust off and finding an extra floppy power cable...thinking that I must have unplug it from somewhere...so I end up plugin it into a motherboard jumpers lol That was my 386DX...I needed an update anyway :) Got 486 133Mhz...loved the turbo button
    perhaps they should bring it back
    0
  • morpheas768
    maxinexusRemember 5.25" floppy and monochromatic screens? Childhood well spend I tell ya. I also remember for the first time opening my PC tower and cleaning dust off and finding an extra floppy power cable...thinking that I must have unplug it from somewhere...so I end up plugin it into a motherboard jumpers lol That was my 386DX...I needed an update anyway Got 486 133Mhz...loved the turbo buttonperhaps they should bring it back

    That turbo button has become Intel's Turbo Boost technology, so it would be rather pointless.
    0