History of Intel Chipsets

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Michael Justin Allen Sexton

Michael Justin Allen Sexton is a Contributing Writer for Tom's Hardware US. He covers hardware component news, specializing in CPUs and motherboards.

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  • ubercake
    Pretty cool article. I like the summaries. Makes me think of the 'years gone by...' Nice job!
    1
  • david germain
    no Slot 1 or IoT chips?
    -1
  • 10tacle
    I love walks down memory lane! It's been nearly 20 years (Jan 1998) when I built my first PC, a Pentium II 333MHz with an Nvidia Riva 128 GPU. Moving from console with a 640x480 resolution TV to a gaming PC using a 1280x1024 resolution desptop monitor was a thing of beauty to my eyes. Quake II was the first game I played on it, and I will never forget being in awe at how far down the halls I could see and shoot the enemy - the visual quality and depth perception took gaming for me to the next level. I never looked back. The only mistake I ever made in hardware selection was jumping on the RAMBUS memory bandwagon with a Pentium 4 build as RDRAM was abandoned (and wise I might add).
    0
  • WyomingKnott
    Why didn't Quickpath stick around? It beat the pants off the current DMI 3.
    Or is it still present but only in Xeon?
    0
  • Crashman
    Anonymous said:
    no Slot 1 or IoT chips?
    We're going to pretend the 440BX and LX weren't primarily used with Slot 1 now?
    0
  • Nuwan Fernando
    I still have the intel 386 CPU rated 25 MHz running in an IBM Computer. It has windows 3.1 work group edition. I use it to balance my dad's book rack from a side now.
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  • IInuyasha74
    Anonymous said:
    Why didn't Quickpath stick around? It beat the pants off the current DMI 3.
    Or is it still present but only in Xeon?


    It's gone. Everything uses DMI now. Intel also has its Omni-Path Interconnect. It put this on processors for the Purley platform. But it isn't used to connect to the chipset.

    As for Socket 1, it didn't have special chipsets. Like Crashman said, it used the 440BX and similar chipsets.
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  • Crashman
    Anonymous said:
    Anonymous said:
    Why didn't Quickpath stick around? It beat the pants off the current DMI 3.
    Or is it still present but only in Xeon?


    It's gone. Everything uses DMI now. Intel also has its Omni-Path Interconnect. It put this on processors for the Purley platform. But it isn't used to connect to the chipset.

    As for Socket 1, it didn't have special chipsets. Like Crashman said, it used the 440BX and similar chipsets.

    Socket 1? The 5V-only predecessor to Sockets 2 and 3? Surely you mean Slot 1 :D
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  • icedeocampo
    Somewhere there is a "Penitum" - please proof read and include 386
    0
  • Lutfij
    It's nice to have a walk through memory lane, in this case twas chipset lane :) Nice work Justin! :D
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