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Adata Shows Off SSD with 1 Million IOPS, 7,000 MBps Reads

Adata XPG Sage SSD

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

If an M.2 SSD that reads at 3,500 MBps seems a little slow to you, Adata has good news. Here at CES 2020, the company unveiled the XPG Sage, an upcoming PCIe Gen 4 SSD that promises read and write speeds of over 7,000 and 6,000 MBps, along with 1 million / 800K IOPS read and writes. Due out later this year for an undetermined price, the Sage is among the first to use Innogrit's Rainier controller.

At its CES suite, Adata showed some preliminary CrystalDisk results from the Sage. The demo unit managed sequential read and writes of 7,240 and 5,395 MBps respectively. However, an Adata product manager said he expects the write rate to increase to over 6,000 MBps by the time the firmware is finalized.

Adata XPG Sage SSD

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

The Innogrit Rainier (IG5236) controller promises significant speed and IOPS improvements over the Phison E16, the controller found in all the current-gen PCIe 4.0 SSDs. The Corsair MP600, which uses the E16 controller, is rated for read / writes of 4,950 / 4,250 MBps, about 25 percent less than the Rainier-powered XPG Sage. Additionally Corsair's SSD is rated for only 680,000 / 600,000 IOPS, 30 to 40 percent less than the Sage's 1 million / 800,000 read / write IOPS.

Innogrit is a new name in the SSD controller space, but the specs on its Rainier IG5236 are impressive. It uses 8 channels, with a 16 / 12nm TSMC FinFET manufacturing process, and can support up to 16TB of storage. The Sage itself will be available in capacities of up to 4TB. 

Adata XPG Sage SSD

(Image credit: Tom's Hardware)

An Adata representative said that the Sage has a full 4GB of DRAM cache. As part of the XPG gaming line, it will have an attractive heatspreader, but the company didn't have one to show us just yet.

Given the fluctuation in NAND prices, Adata could not share target pricing. A rep did say that we should expect to see the Sage sometime later this year, perhaps around the Computex (May / June) time frame. 

  • Quaddro
    Holy moly, that thing is even faster than my system memory... (i'm still using lga 775 ddr2 in one of my computers)
    Reply
  • fixxxer113
    It's gonna be one hell of a day at home when you upgrade :P
    Reply
  • herrwizo
    It would be nice to see some improvements in random read department as well. With the exception of Optane, virtually all NVMe drives from past few years hover around 60MB/s mark.
    Reply
  • daglesj
    Does it need 10 ounces of copper stuck to the controller to keep it under 80 degrees?
    Reply
  • Xajel
    Holy cow, this is even faster than Samsung's PCIe 4.0 drives... hopefully it will come at a good price and good endurance also.

    Thought Samsung only revealed their Pro drive, which usually use MLC and not TLC, usually these will be priced higher already as they're more reliable. But I'm wondering about the Evo version too. I don't think the evo will be faster than the pro anyway.
    Reply
  • djayjp
    Quaddro said:
    Holy moly, that thing is even faster than my system memory... (i'm still using lga 775 ddr2 in one of my computers)

    Actually that's not true. Random read is only 64MB/s, highlighting the still huge disparity between flash and ram.
    Reply
  • drinking12many
    Also consider they are only using a 1GB file that will fully sit in the DRAM on drive.
    Reply
  • magnetite
    4K read speeds are still slow. Haven't changed much over the years.
    Reply
  • Mandark
    And I still wouldn’t buy one because it’s from adata

    Crap on a crap stick
    Reply