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nDreams' 'The Asssembly' Heads To PSVR Next Week

Earlier this year, nDreams released its latest title, The Assembly, on the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift, as well as a non-VR version for PC. Next week, the game will make its way to PlayStation VR (PSVR).

The game puts you in the perspectives of Drs. Cal Pearson and Madeline Stone, both of whom are in a scientific facility, appropriately called "The Assembly." With these two characters, you’ll find out more about what occurs in the massive building complex by solving puzzles and exploring the area. In order to progress the story, you’ll also have to make some choices that will test your moral beliefs.

With the game on the HTC Vive and PSVR, you would think that The Assembly utilizes the controllers that come with both HMDs. However, the game supports a gamepad (this includes the DualShock 4 controller for the PSVR variant) as well as a keyboard and mouse on PC. As our own Kevin Carbotte mentioned, the game uses multiple locomotive mechanics, such as a variation on Cloudhead Games’ Blink and comfort mode in addition to short, instantaneous movements with the gamepad, in order to create an experience free of nausea.

The Assembly arrives on the PlayStation Store on October 13, which is the launch day for PSVR. It will cost $29.99.

Game Details
NameThe Assembly
TypeFirst-person, Narrative, Puzzle, Exploration
DevelopernDreams
PublishernDreams
PlatformsHTC Vive, Oculus Rift, PlayStation VR, PC
Where To BuySteamOculus
Release DateJuly 19 (HTC Vive, Oculus Rift, PC)October 13 (PSVR)
  • Jeff Fx
    I really hope that limited me-too VR systems like PSVR don't cause people to reject VR. Low resolution and poor controller tracking are going to be a problem. Move was a disappointment for regular gaming because of the tracking problems, and I don't expect they've solved their tracking problem.

    2016 VR is amazing, it's just that it's only been delivered by HTC so far, and for a really good experience, you need a GTX 1080 rather than the 970 they say is the minimum requirement. Turning on super-sampling in the Steam VR config file makes a huge difference in visual quality.
    Reply
  • Crystalizer
    "Turning on super-sampling in the Steam VR config file makes a huge difference in visual quality."

    In some of the games yes. In some games where there is proper antialiasing implemented adjusting super sampling just breaks things or atleast last time I tried it with holopoint, but you really don't need it there. 40-60 fps for me is totally acceptable. I have experience few lags too with 970. It's not that bad with vive I think. Only when you move with controller without teleporting/blinking and you can always turn down graphics. Vive just needs more quality games, but everyone seems to be reinventing paper physics. Some kids people play games at less than 25 fps and they are perfectly fine with it. They don't even know about better since the hardware is up to their parents wallet.

    The requirements have changed, but at this point I'm really not sure if it's just the graphic perfectionist who use quality panels and require 120 fps at 2k resolution like how I was. I would be more interested how a regular homie feels about all this than quality elitist.

    PSVR has one really good thing. The ergonomics are much better. I have never tried it, but it puts it's weight on the forehead instead of face. I think it's highly possible that psvr is the only vr system that succeeds on large scale even if it's not up to challenge vive on quality.
    Reply
  • Jeff Fx
    18680330 said:
    "Turning on super-sampling in the Steam VR config file makes a huge difference in visual quality."

    In some of the games yes. In some games where there is proper antialiasing implemented adjusting super sampling just breaks things or atleast last time I tried it with holopoint, but you really don't need it there. 40-60 fps for me is totally acceptable. I have experience few lags too with 970. It's not that bad with vive I think. Only when you move with controller without teleporting/blinking and you can always turn down graphics. Vive just needs more quality games, but everyone seems to be reinventing paper physics. Some kids people play games at less than 25 fps and they are perfectly fine with it. They don't even know about better since the hardware is up to their parents wallet.

    The requirements have changed, but at this point I'm really not sure if it's just the graphic perfectionist who use quality panels and require 120 fps at 2k resolution like how I was. I would be more interested how a regular homie feels about all this than quality elitist.

    PSVR has one really good thing. The ergonomics are much better. I have never tried it, but it puts it's weight on the forehead instead of face. I think it's highly possible that psvr is the only vr system that succeeds on large scale even if it's not up to challenge vive on quality.

    Vive games are simple now because developers are just starting to learn how to make VR games. Eventually we'll have lots of AAA titles, but we've only had time to develop simple games so far. Even a simple wave-based shooter like Brookhaven is pretty good in VR, but people will expect more than that as more games come out.

    The Vive strap is terrible, but you can 3D print some parts that make it easy to replace the straps with inexpensive welding headgear, which is much easier and more comfortable to use. HTC really dropped the ball on the ergonomics, but we're in the early adopter stage where some DIY is expected.
    Reply