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Gigabyte Confirms BRIX Pro Compact PC Kit with Iris Pro

Gigabyte today launched the BRIX Pro featuring Intel's Iris Pro graphics. We first heard about this model of BRIX back in September, at IDF San Francisco. Gigabyte had three models of BRIX at IDF including one that was rumored to have Iris Pro graphics and possibly the Core i7-4770R.

 

Gigabyte today made things official, announcing the BRIX Pro with the aforementioned Intel Core i7-4770R and Iris Pro graphics 5200. Users will actually have a choice between the Core i7-4770R or Core i5-4570R, and the BRIX Pro will ship with a WiFi Mini PCIe module pre-installed as well as a power adapter and cable.

Under the hood, you're looking at two SO-DIMM DD3L slots, support for mSATA SSD and standard 2.5-inch SSD installation, as well as Mini DisplayPort, HDMI, 4x USB 3.0 (two in the front, two in the back), Gigabit Ethernet, and Bluetooth 4.0.

The whole package measures 62 x 114.4 x 111.4 mm. No word on price or release date just yet, but we'll keep you posted. Stay tuned for hands on impressions!

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  • thebigt42
    "as well as a power adapter and cable" Take that Intel!
    Reply
  • LaughALot
    Looks like the power switch is on the top. Be better if it were on the front to permit stacking.
    Reply
  • damianrobertjones
    ? The nuc comes with the power cables
    Reply
  • Leafy
    I've been waiting so long for this baby. Lugging my heavy tower home for the break and having the graphics crap out on my on the way back made me wish this was released back in December :D
    Reply
  • iamadev
    @damianrobertjones - No it doesn't
    Reply
  • hypergreatthing
    The ivy core NUCs do not come with the power cable. A separate purchase has to be made for the "3-Slot Mickey Mouse type plug" that's required to plug the power adapter into the wall.
    Intel started adding them in the Haswell based NUCs.
    Reply
  • iamadev
    @hypergreatthing - According to the Anandtech article on the new Haswell NUC

    "The power cord needed is a C6 type that plugs into the power adapter's C5 type connector. The 3-plug C6 connector is also known as a cloverleaf connector. It does keep costs for Intel down, but it would have been really nice to localize this component to the country of sale"

    It is cheap to not add something that costs just a couple dollars/pounds retail but hey I guess they will pass the saving on to us customers....
    Reply
  • hypergreatthing
    12374224 said:
    @hypergreatthing - According to the Anandtech article on the new Haswell NUC

    "The power cord needed is a C6 type that plugs into the power adapter's C5 type connector. The 3-plug C6 connector is also known as a cloverleaf connector. It does keep costs for Intel down, but it would have been really nice to localize this component to the country of sale"

    It is cheap to not add something that costs just a couple dollars/pounds retail but hey I guess they will pass the saving on to us customers....
    Going off of an amazon q&a:

    The production SKU of the D54250WYK is supposed to include the power cord. This has been confirmed in several reviews which include the following message from the Intel PR team:
    "The pre-production NUC units we sent you did not have power cords. This is because we did not want to card multiple SKUs of pre-production units. However, with our production SKUs we WILL have power cord options for US, EU, and UK. We'll also continue to carry "no cord" SKUs for markets that have other adapters."
    Reply
  • Christopher Shaffer
    I'm sorry for being thick, but what is the target market for this device? If it's essentially a tiny gaming PC, that's nifty, but I feel like the CPU is overkill.

    Seems like it would make a good media box, but again seems like overkill on the CPU.

    A compact desktop seems like a good target, too, but AGAIN, CPU would be overkill.

    So, who exactly is this for?
    Reply
  • iamadev
    @hypergreatthing - Looks like I am wrong about half the world and right about the other half.

    Care to admit we are both right in some context?
    Reply