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Report: Nvidia to Give Green Light for Video Card Designs

Apparently, Nvidia is enforcing its Green Light program, which requires graphics card makers to send in their designs for Nvidia's approval. The approval will not be given if certain noise, power, voltage and heat levels are not met. Without that approval, those cards cannot be sold. Bright Side of News said that EVGA was one of the first to feel Nvidia's whip and had to remove the EVBot voltage control tool from the EVGA GTX 680 Classified.

Of course, it's easy to chastise Nvidia for this type of control, which will not allow extreme graphics cards configurations anymore. However, Nvidia's brand and perception are exposed with every card that is sold and it is understandable that the company wants to make sure that it is represented in the way it wants. Extreme designs that go overboard are unlikely to meet the specifications of Nvidia's marketing promises and are likely to be shot down.

It's not exactly what the enthusiast's heart desires and it most certainly impacts the creativity of vendors, which will have an even tougher time to differentiate its parts from the competition. But if you argue from Nvidia's point of view, then - if the Green Light report is true - the company surely has a case.

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  • dutchling
    Is this a response to the MSI overvolting fiasco?
    Reply
  • virtualban
    Intel is reportedly cracking down on graphics card designs that do not meet the company's approval.
    *scratches head*
    Reply
  • memadmax
    Screw you Nvidia, you just christened a new market: Video card mods at the board level.
    Now we will have tons of chinese bastard companies selling garbage ware to mod the boards and what not.

    Congrats!
    Reply
  • phishy714
    Yeah this is bullsh*t. While I do understand the need for them to protect their brand, this just imposes wayy too much power to Nvidia. Sure, for now its going to be "you can't give this too much voltage in fear that it will explode." But what keeps them from saying:

    "Wow, Asus, that is a great card and falls within all limits - however it is TOO good, too fast compared to future cards, too quiet compared to competition. We can't let you make it."

    I mean, damn. They could make EVERYONE use blower style cards because it "doesn't fall within specs" if they wanted. This is a bad move, Nvidia. Very disappointing.
    Reply
  • EDVINASM
    I am very happy with this move because to me as a consumer it means only one - better quality and more hard work from vendors. Great news. Nobody said the modding is gone - NVidia just wants to be sure it makes sense and does not ruin the card within few years. Way to go.
    I am sure there is a lot of controversy (just like there always was) but at the end of the day NVidia is here for one - profit. They won't go crazy on every manufacturer because they don't want to sell less they just want to make sure the brand is represented right and there is nothing wrong with it.
    Free market has never worked - fact. Everything needs regulation to certain extent. We will have to wait and see how this project will be carried out.
    Reply
  • SnickerSnack
    Maybe this is where my MSI GTX 690 went - I've been waiting for a lightning extreme version of the card, but they haven't even released a regular one yet. Earlier this week I was ecstatic to see the 690 finally listed on MSI.com, but no vendors are stocking it. Now, as of yesterday, it no longer exists on MSI's website whatsoever. This is probably why.
    Reply
  • lamorpa
    What's Intel got to do with it?
    Reply
  • A Bad Day
    memadmaxScrew you Nvidia, you just christened a new market: Video card mods at the board level.Now we will have tons of chinese bastard companies selling garbage ware to mod the boards and what not.Congrats!
    Counter-measure: Invest in better RMA process and add a record chip to the GPUs, one that is designed to catch more shenanigans (sneaky mods, software OC) than regular.
    Reply
  • EDVINASM
    A Bad DayCounter-measure: Invest in better RMA process and add a record chip to the GPUs, one that is designed to catch more shenanigans (sneaky mods, software OC) than regular.
    Sounds good however, then NVidia will be blamed for spying on your PC :-) PR has to be sure their proposal will work. A lot of PC component buyers and users are empty headed drones with Fisher Price tools and they are first to spread all the controversies. NVidia must be sure that these drones are not gone rogue to do what they are best at - spread false information. While there is always a better way - usually the one that satisfies most people is chosen. Sadly in some cases as alternatives are as good or better.
    Reply
  • alidan
    you know those cards that overclock to preform as good as non oc versions of cards out of their price range...

    well it was fun while that lasted...
    Reply