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PS4 Remote Play For PC, Mac Arrives Tomorrow

Starting tomorrow, you can download the latest system update (version 3.50) for the PlayStation 4. Along with more social-based features, Sony provided details on Remote Play for PC and Mac.

After the update is installed on the PlayStation 4, you’ll have to download the Remote Play installer on your computer. For Windows-based PCs, the streaming feature works on Windows 8.1 and 10 systems. For Mac users, you’ll need to have OS X Yosemite (10.10) or El Capitan (10.11).

At launch, you’ll have a maximum resolution of 720p, but the stream will default to a resolution of 540p. In addition, you’ll get to play at 60 frames per second (the default setting is 30 frames per second).

Obviously, you’ll also get to use the DualShock 4 controller, which will need to be plugged in to your PC or Mac device via a USB cable. This means that Sony will finally have an official driver for the controller. In the past, users had to rely on third-party drivers (such as DS4Windows) to use the DualShock 4 on the PC.

As far as social features are concerned, the new update will also show what games are being played by every member of your party, and you can now schedule gameplay events for you and your friends. You can also get notifications when a certain friend is online, or you can choose to appear offline while you play.

The 720p resolution at launch might be distressing to some, but it's important to note that Microsoft didn't have 1080p/60fps support when it initially launched the Xbox One streaming feature on Windows 10 last July. That feature was added one month later. It’s unclear whether or not Sony will follow the same timeline, but with enough feedback, the company could (and should) add 1080p/60fps streaming support in the near future.

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  • iamapizza
    > At launch, you’ll have a maximum resolution of 720p, but the stream will default to a resolution of 540p.

    http://i.imgur.com/qFO5mIZ.gif
    Reply
  • targetdrone
    Can someone explain the point of this to a non-console gamer?
    If I have a PC and a Console why would I play the console version of a game on a PC at a much worse screen resolution and have to deal with streaming lag?
    Reply
  • epobirs
    Can someone explain the point of this to a non-console gamer?
    If I have a PC and a Console why would I play the console version of a game on a PC at a much worse screen resolution and have to deal with streaming lag?

    This is of zero interest to a non-console gamer. Why are you even compelled to comment on something concerning console use?

    It isn't that complicated. Consoles are typically connected to the main TV in the home in a shared location like a living room. Other rooms may have TVs but they are usually of lesser size and/or quality. All too often there is conflict over who gets to use the preferred screen, so remote play allows the console to be used while the attached TV is displaying from a different input. Over a LAN the latency shouldn't be unacceptable and many types of games won't be affected. An end to end wired connection should be sufficient for 1080p but as WiFi is more common in residential console use Sony may have given it a low priority and will deliver it in an an update, as Microsoft did in their Xbox One to PC remote play support.

    I'm currently not getting much use out of my console downstairs in the living room, mainly for lack of time and abundance of stress but if things get calmer I would run into the conflict described above and remote play could be of value, especially since the network is fully wired in my home.
    Reply
  • Zhyr
    Can someone explain the point of this to a non-console gamer?
    If I have a PC and a Console why would I play the console version of a game on a PC at a much worse screen resolution and have to deal with streaming lag?

    This is of zero interest to a non-console gamer. Why are you even compelled to comment on something concerning console use?

    Because they didn't understand, and wanted an explanation?

    On the bright side, your explanation did explain it, because I didn't understand why people would want it either.
    Reply
  • Adilaris
    Can someone explain the point of this to a non-console gamer?
    If I have a PC and a Console why would I play the console version of a game on a PC at a much worse screen resolution and have to deal with streaming lag?

    This is of zero interest to a non-console gamer. Why are you even compelled to comment on something concerning console use?

    It isn't that complicated. Consoles are typically connected to the main TV in the home in a shared location like a living room. Other rooms may have TVs but they are usually of lesser size and/or quality. All too often there is conflict over who gets to use the preferred screen, so remote play allows the console to be used while the attached TV is displaying from a different input. Over a LAN the latency shouldn't be unacceptable and many types of games won't be affected. An end to end wired connection should be sufficient for 1080p but as WiFi is more common in residential console use Sony may have given it a low priority and will deliver it in an an update, as Microsoft did in their Xbox One to PC remote play support.

    I'm currently not getting much use out of my console downstairs in the living room, mainly for lack of time and abundance of stress but if things get calmer I would run into the conflict described above and remote play could be of value, especially since the network is fully wired in my home.

    Also, there are games that are exclusive to the console that you cannot play on pc without emulation. This solves that problem, and I imagine it would also allow for local video capture without needing a capture card; like shadowplay if you use a gtx card.
    Reply
  • wurkfur
    My son has a laptop connected to his flat panel TV in his room. The PS4 is in our living room. He can now stream to his room without taking the bigscreen.

    I'm excited to hear this.
    Reply
  • jfkeenan
    Can someone explain the point of this to a non-console gamer?
    If I have a PC and a Console why would I play the console version of a game on a PC at a much worse screen resolution and have to deal with streaming lag?

    Because the industry is testing the concept of streaming games. Someday your "console" will be dumb device with little memory or graphics power. You'll pay to play and they don't need to worry about the client hardware.
    Reply
  • captaincharisma
    i'm more looking forward to the PS4 drivers to use a the controller on my PC then playing PS4 games on it. i already have a 360 controller for PC games but this will be good if i ever need a second controller
    Reply
  • bwohl
    i'm more looking forward to the PS4 drivers to use a the controller on my PC then playing PS4 games on it. i already have a 360 controller for PC games but this will be good if i ever need a second controller
    Myself also - can I use the PS4 controller for Steam Big Screen now? ;)
    Reply
  • Sublime1027
    I use my Playstation 4 controller with my PC everyday. DS4Windows is no longer being developed. It has turned into InputMapper and works flawlessly for me. I use it in big picture mode in steam and any game that works with the Xbox 360 controller. I'm using it wireless with a Bluetooth adapter. That's the only thing, make sure the dongle works with the ps4 controller. I even use the trackpad on the controller as a mouse on the desktop! InputMapper is an amazing program and I want everyone to at least know it is an option to use your DS4 with your PC
    Reply