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Sapphire's Radeon RX 6600 Listed Weeks Ahead of Launch

Sapphire
(Image credit: VideoCardz)

Portuguese retailer PCDiga accidentally listed the yet-to-be-announced AMD Radeon RX 6600 (non-XT) graphics card from Sapphire. It has since been pulled, but it was up long enough for VideoCardz to make screenshots and save pictures of the board. The expected launch date is October 13, according to Videocardz.

The board in question belongs to the Pulse family, so it has a rather modest design and cooling system. But while AMD's Radeon RX 6600 is supposed to be more or less cheap, the listing had the Sapphire Pulse Radeon RX 6600 priced at €589.90 including VAT (about $560 without VAT). Keeping in mind that the Radeon RX 6600 XT retails for around €550~€630 ($535~$614 without taxes) in Europe, the listing seems to be somewhat inflated.

AMD's Radeon RX 6600 XT is officially priced at $379, but its real-world price tends to be considerably higher. Still, we expect the official MSRP for the non-XT will be lower, possibly going head-to-head with Nvidia's (theoretically priced) $329 RTX 3060. We'll have to wait for the launch to see how the GPU actually performs.

Sapphire

(Image credit: VideoCardz)

Sapphire's Pulse Radeon RX 6600 (11310-01-20G) will reportedly use a cut-down version of AMD's Navi 23 GPU with 28 CUs and 1792 stream processors, a 32MB Infinity Cache, and a 128-bit memory interface that will be used to connect 8GB of 16 GT/s GDDR6 memory. The card will feature a dual-fan dual-slot cooling system, four display outputs (three DP 1.4, one HDMI 2.0), and one 8-pin auxiliary PCIe power connector. 

The graphics card itself looks rather small, smaller than the Sapphire RX 6600 XT Pulse. The XT performed quite well in our testing, with plenty of headroom, so a cut-down design ought to be able to cope with the lower tier GPU. We don't know the exact GPU clocks yet, but it's a safe bet that they won't be any higher than the XT model. It apparently has four CUs disabled, which means its potential performance will likely be around 10% slower than the full-blown Radeon RX 6600 XT, give or take.

Check back in October and we should have a full review of the Radeon RX 6600.

  • gargoylenest
    awesome, cant wait to see some refreshed 3dfx voodoo card for sale at 350$...
    Reply
  • vern72
    No thanks. I like the form factor but PCIe 4.0 x 8 makes it a neutered card in my eyes.
    Reply
  • SSGBryan
    Dr Su, we get it.
    AMD knows how to make an 8Gb RX 480.
    Reply
  • Teeroy32
    Yawn, another overpriced card that won't be replacing my RX480.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    SSGBryan said:
    Dr Su, we get it.
    AMD knows how to make an 8Gb RX 480.
    If it was an RX480, at least it would have full x16 PCIe.

    With some luck, Xe's availability and pricing will at least put the brakes on AMD and Nvidia shaving corners while charging more for the privilege.
    Reply
  • dan1991Ro
    Idk what you guys are saying...
    A 6600 non xt is considerably better than a rx480...
    I have a rx 570, i have my eye on this card if its at msrp opening day.After the first day there will be no chance to get one at msrp if it will be on the first day that iswhich is doubtful.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    dan1991Ro said:
    Idk what you guys are saying...
    A 6600 non xt is considerably better than a rx480...
    If its street price is going to be over twice as much at launch if you can get it at all in the foreseeable future, it would need to be waaaaaaay faster to be remotely comparable value.

    New GPUs are of no value to the value-oriented buyer when the price points are out of budget or the performance-per-dollar isn't improving anywhere near enough to offset the rising price point pain.
    Reply
  • dan1991Ro
    InvalidError said:
    If its street price is going to be over twice as much at launch if you can get it at all in the foreseeable future, it would need to be waaaaaaay faster to be remotely comparable value.

    New GPUs are of no value to the value-oriented buyer when the price points are out of budget or the performance-per-dollar isn't improving anywhere near enough to offset the rising price point pain.

    I agree, but im afraid my gpu will die, so if i can get this for 350 euro at launch, ill probably buy it.
    Reply
  • SSGBryan
    InvalidError said:
    If it was an RX480, at least it would have full x16 PCIe.

    With some luck, Xe's availability and pricing will at least put the brakes on AMD and Nvidia shaving corners while charging more for the privilege.

    4.0 x8 = x16 on 3.0.

    What makes you think Intel won't go for as much as they can? They aren't a charity.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    SSGBryan said:
    What makes you think Intel won't go for as much as they can? They aren't a charity.
    The last time Intel tried launching a dGPU, it was garbage. Intel's IGP drivers are ok-ish as far as gaming is concerned, nothing any enthusiast would be particularly eager to jump onto especially if the prices are anywhere near AMD/Nvidia GPUs, especially if Nvidia and AMD GPU supply gets better in the meantime.

    Intel is in a worse situation for GPU market penetration than AMD was when it launched the RX470/480. If it wants to grab market share, it will need to provide exceptional performance per dollar to offset its nonexistent to somewhat negative reputation handicap in the gaming graphics department.

    Intel's biggest potential customer base for DG2/Alchemist will be people desperate enough for a meaningful upgrade at a reasonable price to take a chance on early hardware and driver maturity.
    Reply