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Thermaltake Expands DPS G RGB PSU Lineup, Six Models Incoming

Thermaltake announced six new eco-friendly power supplies at Computex today. Three platinum-rated, and three gold-rated DPS G RGB series units will launch in the coming weeks, featuring RGB lighting, smart power management and a companion mobile app that warns you if there’s a problem with the power delivery system.

Thermaltake launched the Toughpower DPS G RGB modular power supply series in January with a single 1250w model. The company must have enjoyed strong demand for the RGB-lit, energy-efficient power supply, because it decided to expand the lineup with a half dozen more models. The platinum lineup expanded to four models, including newly announced 850w, 1000w and 1500w products. Thermaltake has added a gold series Toughpower DPS G RGB lineup, and it includes 650w, 750w and 850w units.

Thermaltake’s Toughpower DPS G RGB power supplies feature an 140mm RGB fan with digital fan control. Thermaltake’s software allows you to monitor and adjust fan speeds and noise. There are three adjustment modes: Silent, which puts emphasis on keeping volume levels low; Performance, which doesn't; and Smart Zero Fan mode, which leaves the fan idle as much as it can. The fan color can also be adjusted between 256 different options, and the fan color selection will remain even if the power supply is unplugged.

Thermaltake said that all Toughpower DPS G RGB power supplies are built with 100% Japanese capacitors and the company backs its product with a 10-year warranty. Platinum-rated units deliver up to 94 percent efficiency, gold rated units boast 90 percent efficiency.

The main difference between the gold series and the platinum series DPS G RGB power supplies—aside from their efficiency ratings—are the microcontroller units that each series employs. The platinum series features a 32-bit MCU from STMicroelectronics. The gold series features Microchip Technology MCUs. We’re not sure what the differences between the two devices are, but we surmise it comes down to cost. Both MCU devices offer the same functionality.

The entire lineup of Toughpower DPS G RGB power supplies offer Smart Power Management (SPM), which is controlled by the MCU. Thermaltake offers a companion application that you can install on your smart phone to access power usage data from anywhere. The MCU monitors the power delivery system and will warn you if there’s an irregularity. The app will let you reboot or shutdown the system remotely if necessary. SPM is also able to generate power efficiency and usage reports. The Efficiency/Wattage report is presented in a number of graphs that let you determine how much power you are using, and it will help you assess the power supply capacity you need to achieve maximum energy conservation.

Thermaltake has not yet revealed the pricing for each model, but we don’t expect them to be cheap. The 1250w DPS G RGB launched in January for $379. The company said that the new entrants to the DPS G RGB series will be available in Q2, so they should be on store shelves in a matter of weeks.

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  • Casey Jones
    AMD keeping the 1500watt PSU market viable.
    Reply
  • Virtual_Singularity
    I can't imagine ever using a tt psu. Even the ones featured in this article seem to be as tacky looking and, more importantly, will likely be overpriced and mediocre compared to the much of the competition, same as in the past.

    Why any PSU should have rgb lighting is beyond me. I guess some people just love stuff that blinks and is shiny, even if it offers no functionality whatsoever and means the manufacturer gets overcharge as much as they can for it.
    Reply
  • g-unit1111
    18052620 said:
    Why any PSU should have rgb lighting is beyond me. I guess some people just love stuff that blinks and is shiny, even if it offers no functionality whatsoever and means the manufacturer gets overcharge as much as they can for it.

    I don't understand that one either. The PSU fan generally faces downward in your case and newer cases hide the PSU with a cover anyways (NZXT H440, Phanteks Enthoo Pro, etc). That's one item I don't see the point to. Even if you make your system completely RGB, that still seems like a waste.
    Reply