Thermaltake View 71 TG EATX Case Review

8/25/2017 Update: The value analysis in this article was updated to reflect a last minute price reduction by Thermaltake.

The market rush towards tempered glass cases often puts form ahead of function, with some models suffering dire thermal consequences after hours of heating up. But case designers also know that tempered glass does a good job of reflecting noise back into the case, and that good airflow can more than make up for the poor thermal properties of glass. The trick has always been figuring out how to configure the vents to achieve maximum airflow with minimum noise.

As we often see in the gaming case market, Thermaltake builds onto the outside of its 19” chassis to create full-tower external dimensions from mid-tower internals. Yet a 19”-tall chassis is really at the limit of what’s traditionally been labeled a mid-tower. The case does make some practical use of the extra height after all, placing just over 1.1” of fan space above its top-panel radiator mount, while still leaving 2.3” of space beneath that panel for a radiator and fans. If we look at a sandwiched radiator configuration as today’s alternative to a top-mounted drive rack, Thermaltake might have even earned its full-tower label. Or maybe we’re just being a little bit charitable.

Regardless of how Thermaltake reached the View 71 TG’s full-tower height, it certainly has full-size depth. Around 19.8” of internal depth makes enough space for an EATX motherboard and a drive rack in front of it and even a 42mm radiator in front of that. The included 140mm front fan is mounted between the front of the chassis and the front panel glass, inside the plastic fascia.

Front-panel connectors are located neither on the front or top panels, but on a corner filler section that goes between these facades. Two USB 3.0 ports, two USB 2.0 ports, headphone and microphone jacks are all tilted forward to ease access from under a desk. Oh, and if it’s not apparent, the white plastic edge of the power button lights up when the finished system is powered on.

The right panel is glass, just like the left, and both are hinged to ease access to internal components. This is particularly useful since both panels are extra heavy 5mm glass that would have easily been dropped, though if you need to remove the panels you can carefully lift them off their hinge pins. The only question the design left us with was where to hide our cables.

A full-length, slide-out filter covers the power supply inlet and a slotted bottom grill large enough to hold up to two 120mm fans if you’re power supply is short enough (up to around 7” with the second fan), or a single fan in various fore-to-aft positions. It’s not as convenient as a front-pull filter, however.

The front and top faces have filter sheets with magnetic surrounds and tabs. The magnets stick, which probably means there’s at least some metal within the plastic panels, but the tabs that are meant to prevent pealing also complicate installation. It took me at least three minutes to get the filter pictured above/left under its last three tabs without putting creases in the filter sheet.

With the outer panels removed, we can more easily see the front fan mounts, the top fan bracket, the two removable/repositionable hard drive cages, and the riser bracket designed for Thermaltake’s flexible PCIe x16 riser cable (not included).

Plastic trays within the drive cages are designed to hold both 3.5” and 2.5” drives, with the connectors facing out the opposite (motherboard tray) side.

Even without the riser cable, the View 71 TG has an eighth slot to support both XL-ATX motherboards and the installation of a double-slot graphics card in the bottom slot of an ATX motherboard. This is a key feature for buyers seeking the ultimate installation flexibility, and mandatory for those who want to run four large graphics cards within the motherboard’s slots.

Also visible from the rear ¾ angle are the View 71’s three dual-drive 2.5” trays and 1.5” recess for cable and drive clearance. Each metal tray alternatively supports a single 3.5” drive turned lengthwise, and a side-panel spacers extends total internal clearance to 1.75”.

Being slightly longer than the front-panel height, the top-panel radiator mount supports both 3x 120mm and 3x 140mm models. Four thumb screws provide easy removal, while open sides make it easier for builders of “fan sandwich” radiator configurations to place cables.

MORE: Best Cases

MORE: All Case Content

This thread is closed for comments
24 comments
    Your comment
  • dstarr3
    Okay, I like tempered glass, but this went too far.
  • veiledcas
    The comment about build quality is enough to see me look elsewhere.

    It's not the first time I've heard that about Thermaltakes newer cases either which should give anyone pause for thought.
  • apleming66
    Still love my Level 10 GT Thank you!
  • sillynilly
    I love the hinged glass - great to see that since I have dropped a glass panel before.
  • drwho269
    How many 3.5 hard drives does it fits?
  • JamesSneed
    If they did a version with aluminum top, front and back side piece so the only glass panel shows off the insides, I would think about it. I like how they did the bezels on the front and top that should keep cooling efficient and noise down just not sure I would love showing off the dust bunnies on the filters.
  • Crashman
    2536666 said:
    How many 3.5 hard drives does it fits?

    A total of seven if you have no 2.5" drives. Due to the way those other three are laid out, it made it difficult to document in the features table.
  • Brian_R170
    42 lbs !?!?
  • balearic
    3.5" drives... stupid case
  • Crashman
    1696401 said:
    42 lbs !?!?

    A hair over that. Not recommended for 98-pound-weaklings.
  • elbert
    On one side I dont like glass but the other side a step toward mineral oil cooling tanks. Why didn't they make this a full dip tank case.
  • drwho269
    7 drives? No thank you.
    I got one that fits 10 3.5 drives, 1 optical, 4 2.5 drives plus another 2.5 drive slot.

    Now that's a full tower.
  • dstarr3
    2536666 said:
    7 drives? No thank you. I got one that fits 10 3.5 drives, 1 optical, 4 2.5 drives plus another 2.5 drive slot. Now that's a full tower.


    What case is that?
  • krb1945
    I purchased a 750W thermaltake, one of the gold units, from a regular computer store in the south east and it failed after 6 months. I gave Thermaltake all the pertinate information and a copy of the receipt which clearly showed the vendor and other info and asked for a return authorization from their customer service. They sent me a real nice email telling me... that I had not purchased this from NewEgg or one of their other dealers, and they refused to honor the warranty. Now this PS was a new unit, in a factory sealed box with all the factory information for this PS. I then contacted the store where I purchased this PS, told them what Termaltake had said and they promptly replaced it with a different brand of the same quality. Fortunately for me I found this out with just one part from them, because I manage and repair 150 systems, and I also purchase for a large government agency, and I know the taxpayers would not want me to purchase from a company that does not honor warranties. I know that neither I nor my friends will purchase anything they manufacturer after my personal experience.
  • Rob1C
    drwho269 said:
    Quote:
    "7 drives? No thank you. I got one that fits 10 3.5 drives, 1 optical, 4 2.5 drives plus another 2.5 drive slot. Now that's a full tower."
    dstarr3 said:
    Quote:
    "What case is that?"
    Assuming you're not asking about a different Manufacturer it's the "Core WP100".

    http://www.thermaltake.com/Chassis/Super_Tower_/Core/C_00002803/Core_WP100/Specification.htm
  • krb1945
    Don't make it any bigger than 42 lbs. I still remember the old 180 lb printers that government use to use. They were real spine loaders and not made for weaklings to move.
  • Larmo-Ct
    I have a thermaltake full tower computer that I purchased from iBUYPOWER, four years ago. It has a plastic side panel with a 7(?) inch fan. (Sorry but I'm not comfortable converting inches into millimeters for fans). The system has a 4-1/2 inch, in the rear and front of the case. I also have a Corsair liquid cooler for my CPU. I have EVGA GTX-980ti and 1200 watt PSU. My point is that, with that cooling arrangement. I haven't had any heat problems. I question the need for, and the wisdom of adding a lot glass to a case. Basically, cases that have been available for years, seem to have been fine. Granted liquid cooling can be an important factor. I prefer the cooling system that I have. Rather than a case with a lot of fragile, and heavy glass.
  • AnarchoPrimitiv
    Would have been nice if they had taken this case, aimed at watercooling, and maybe see what thickness radiators would fit in a multi-radiator loop....I specifically came here for that information
  • Crashman
    2164868 said:
    Would have been nice if they had taken this case, aimed at watercooling, and maybe see what thickness radiators would fit in a multi-radiator loop....I specifically came here for that information
    Check "space above motherboard". Now check what it says about 42mm empty space between the front panel and removable drive cage. I guess you didn't read the article?

    The entire space above the motherboard is also above the front-panel radiator space, so you can at least fit a 58mm-thick 420mm radiator on top and a 42mm-thick 360mm radiator on front, given the information provided. Of course you can't find a 58mm radiator, but you could do a 25mm radiator with a fan sandwich, or a 38mm radiator...some consideration of what's available to you must always be made by you.
  • wojda.john
    Did you reach out to the manufacturer to see if the quality issues were a fluke? Have other reviewers seen this as well (I've looked but didn't notice anybody else mention quality problems).

    I've been looking at a new case for a while, and I keep coming back to this one as my top pick, though I won't be doing any of that water cooling stuff (outside of an AiO for the CPU). Minimal, if any overclocking...
  • Crashman
    2540755 said:
    Did you reach out to the manufacturer to see if the quality issues were a fluke? Have other reviewers seen this as well (I've looked but didn't notice anybody else mention quality problems). I've been looking at a new case for a while, and I keep coming back to this one as my top pick, though I won't be doing any of that water cooling stuff (outside of an AiO for the CPU). Minimal, if any overclocking...
    What answer do you think I would get from any manufacturer concerning manufacturing quality? A better question is, what answer would a manufacturer expect me to give if I represented it?

    We only assume that mundane issues are production issues because they usually are, as indicated by buyers. Major flaws on the other hand are typically worked out during production. The business consideration here is "how much money will this cost us", and returns are a major expense.
  • phobicsq
    I just got this case, the RGB one, and no defects at all. Great case and if you're water cooling it is not very noisy at all.
  • lieutenantfrost
    If you are using a large GPU, 1080 etc you will not be able to mount it vertically with a large air cooler. Very disappionting, also no psu shroud? only room for 120's in front? this case should be a step up from view 31 instead it feels rushed
  • Crashman
    322940 said:
    If you are using a large GPU, 1080 etc you will not be able to mount it vertically with a large air cooler. Very disappionting, also no psu shroud? only room for 120's in front? this case should be a step up from view 31 instead it feels rushed


    By vertically you mean within the side bracket? Well considering it doesn't even come with a riser for the side bracket, and those who opt for one will probably have the money to cool the CPU with a radiator, I think most buyers are relatively safe :)