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Coolers for Intel's Alder Lake CPUs Spotted

Rego
(Image credit: Rego)

Intel's codenamed Alder Lake processors for desktops in the LGA1700 socket are set to be unveiled sometime later this year year. But eager cooler manufacturers already claim to have products ready for these upcoming CPUs. Rego appears to be among the first to announce a lineup of entry-level coolers for Intel's 12th Generation Core processors, as discovered by blogger @momomo_us

Rego on Monday stated that it had developed a lineup of RGD-3000-series cooling systems designed specifically for Intel's Alder Lake-S processors in LGA1700 packaging. The family includes different models that can handle energy-efficient processors with a 35W TDP, high-end enthusiast-grade CPUs with a 125W TDP, and everything in between.  Note, though, that the image above is of previous Rego models. The company hasn't released any images yet of its full set of LGA 1700 coolers.

Rego does not disclose many details of its RGD-3000-series coolers, but notes they will weigh between 234 and 592 grams. Typically, high-end air coolers weigh considerably more these days, so Rego is probably announcing entry-level devices aimed primarily at OEMs and ODMs here. 

Intel's LGA1700 socket is significantly different when compared to existing mainstream Intel CPU socket models. While the new form-factor retains the 37.5-mm width, it extends its length to 45 mm. Even more importantly, the z-height of the new CPUs will be 1 mm lower compared to today's processors (6.5 mm vs. 7.5 mm). One millimeter may seem as a miniscule difference, but it is important to attach a cooler very tightly to the CPU surface, so a millimeter difference is very important here. 

While Intel's Alder Lake processors are not yet available to the consumers, last week Intel said that it would ship Alder Lake processors to its customers in the second half of 2021. 

"Our future client roadmap remains strong and we expect to ship several million units of Alder Lake to customers in the second half," said Pat Gelsinger, CEO of Intel (via SeekingAlpha). 

While several million of units is not exactly a high volume and the vast majority will likely be laptop chips, desktop PC makers will still need to get ready for the launch, which means procuring new coolers and other components. 

One thing to note is that formally Rego positions its RGD-3000 coolers for various special-purpose systems that are 1U, 1.5U, 2U, and 3U. But keeping in mind that Intel typically announces regular desktop processors ahead of their embedded, workstation and server versions, it's likely that Rego's RGD-3000-series will be used for consumer desktops first.

  • Eximo
    First sentence. " later this year year. "
    Reply
  • gargoylenest
    gratz on some of the ugliest cooler out there!
    Reply
  • BillyBuerger
    The picture of the coolers there look primarily like server coolers. Especially the shorter ones. Looks alot like the ones I used on some SuperMicro 2U and 3U servers. Those don't need to be pretty.
    Reply
  • InvalidError
    gargoylenest said:
    gratz on some of the ugliest cooler out there!
    The vast majority of people don't care how pretty the HSF looks, they only care that it works. OEMs may also care about ease of installation, which doesn't get much easier than four pre-installed and easily accessible screws or push-pins for a 5-10 seconds install.
    Reply
  • spongiemaster
    gargoylenest said:
    gratz on some of the ugliest cooler out there!
    They're clearly designed for rackmount cases which don't have windows and no one will ever see them.
    Reply