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Sapphire Introduces New Flagship GPU, AMD R9 300 Nitro Series Cards

Sapphire unveiled the new Nitro series of graphics cards based on the latest AMD Radeon R9 300 series of GPUs. In addition, Sapphire also introduced a new flagship outside of the Nitro series.

These long-awaited GPUs feature the latest standards and technologies in gaming. The cards fully support the upcoming DirectX 12 gaming API, in addition to FreeSync, TrueAudio, Liquid VR, VSR scaling and Ultra HD support. Further, all cards in the Nitro series feature long life capacitors and Sapphire's Black Diamond chokes, giving the Sapphire Tri-X R9 390X the potential to last longer.

Sapphire's flagship GPU is the Sapphire Tri-X R9 390X, featuring new dual ball bearing fans that should improve the lifespan and performance relative to the old Tri-X cooler used on the R9 290X. The fans can turn off completely under a light load thanks to Sapphire's Intelligent Fan Control (IFC-II) technology, resulting in silent operation when not gaming or rendering.

Sapphire's AMD R9 390X comes loaded with 2816 Stream Processors clocked at 1055 MHz, and it packs a whopping 8 GB of GDDR5 clocked at 6000 MHz to support gaming on ultra high resolutions.

Next we have the Sapphire Nitro R9 390, which utilizes the same cooler as the faster Tri-X R9 390X. Overall, the Nitro R9 390 should be just marginally slower, featuring 2560 Stream Processors running at 1010 MHz, supported by 8 GB of GDDR5 clocked at 6000 MHz.

In the R9 380 range of cards, Sapphire introduced the Sapphire Nitro R9 380 with a smaller Dual-X cooler that is similar to the Tri-X, also featuring dual ball bearing fans and IFC-II, but with only two fans instead of three. Sapphire did not disclose the size of its Tri-X fans, but the Dual-X cooler utilizes 10 cm fans which appear to be larger than the fans present on the Tri-X cooler.

The Sapphire Nitro R9 380 comes loaded with 1792 Stream Processors clocked at 985 MHz and packing 4 GB of GDDR5 running at 5800 MHz.

Finally, the last GPU introduced in the Nitro series today is the Sapphire Nitro R7 370. This GPU utilizes the same Dual-X fan as the Sapphire Nitro R9 380. The Stream Processor count in this unit takes a dive down to 1024 with the same 985 MHz core clock, but it maintains the 4 GB of GDDR5, operating at a slightly slower 5600 MHz. All of these GPUs are available now.

But Wait, There's More

In addition to the Nitro series of cards and Sapphire's Radeon Tri-X R9 390X, we spotted another four GPUs on Newegg that Sapphire did not send us information on.

Two of the other cards are nearly identical to the Sapphire Radeon Nitro R9 380 and Sapphire Radeon Nitro R9 370, with very subtle changes in clock speed and dropping down to 2 GB of GDDR5 instead of 4 GB.

A third Sapphire Radeon R9 380 is listed also, closer to the non-Nitro variant, but utilizing only a single fan cooling system. This card is targeted towards the ITX cases that often can't fit a GPU with a long dual-fan cooling system.

The last card is completely new and doesn't have a close counterpart in the Nitro series. This is the Sapphire Radeon R7 360, which features 768 Stream Processors, 2 GB of GDDR5 and a single-fan cooling system.

CardCore CountClock SpeedVRAMVRAM ClockCoolerSeriesMSRP
Sapphire Radeon Tri-X R9 390X28161055 MHz8 GB GDDR56000 MHzTri-XN/A$429
Sapphire Radeon Nitro R9 39025601010 MHz8 GB GDDR56000 MHzTri-XNitro$329
Sapphire Radeon Nitro R9 3801792985 MHz4 GB GDDR55800 MHzDual-XNitro$219
Sapphire Radeon R9 380 100384OCL1792985 MHz2 GB GDDR55600 MHzDual FanN/AN/A
Sapphire Radeon R9 380 100384ITXOCL1792980 MHz2 GB GDDR55600 MHzSingle FanN/AN/A
Sapphire Radeon Nitro R7 3701024985 MHz4 GB GDDR55600 MHzDual-XNitro$149
Sapphire Radeon R7 370 100386OCL 1024985 MHz2 GB GDDR55600 MHzDual FanN/AN/A
Sapphire Radeon R7 360 100388OCL7681060 MHz2 GB GDDR56500 MHzSingle FanN/AN/A

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  • redgarl
    Lol... flagship... seriously...

    The Fury is releasing next week...
    Reply
  • Gam3r01
    Well, its still technically* the current flagship card...
    I think it is also worth noting the "flagship" could have been in relation to the cooler itself, and not AMD's flagship cards.
    Reply
  • Gaidax
    So tell me, why exactly should I pay $429 for "390"X if I can get custom cooled 290X for $350 or less already?
    Reply
  • Llemin
    So tell me, why exactly should I pay $429 for "390"X if I can get custom cooled 290X for $350 or less already?
    Well, from what I have read, the 390 is faster than the 290x for cheaper than that, so you should just buy the 390.
    Reply
  • Gaidax
    So tell me, why exactly should I pay $429 for "390"X if I can get custom cooled 290X for $350 or less already?
    Well, from what I have read, the 390 is faster than the 290x for cheaper than that, so you should just buy the 390.

    390 is not faster than 290X, price is the same pretty much. 390X and 290X are nothing more than 290 and 290X with a new sticker and another useless 4 GB of memory.

    Why they would not release 390 and 390X with 4GB VRAM and slash price by like 40 bucks is beyond me.
    Reply
  • KobeIsInnocent
    So tell me, why exactly should I pay $429 for "390"X if I can get custom cooled 290X for $350 or less already?
    Well, from what I have read, the 390 is faster than the 290x for cheaper than that, so you should just buy the 390.

    390 is not faster than 290X, price is the same pretty much. 390X and 290X are nothing more than 290 and 290X with a new sticker and another useless 4 GB of memory.

    Why they would not release 390 and 390X with 4GB VRAM and slash price by like 40 bucks is beyond me.

    Actually, the extra 4GB of memory is pretty useful when playing games in higher resolution. If you look at the benchmarks, the 390X actually outperforms the 290X and GTX 970 in 3840 x 2160. On lower resolutions like 1920 x 1080 it doesn't make much difference, but I think these cards were aimed more towards higher resolution gaming anyway.
    Reply
  • ammaross
    "These long-awaited GPUs feature the latest standards and technologies in gaming."

    No, the Fury fiji-based GPUs next week are the "long-awaited," not silly rebrands with OCed GDDR.
    Reply
  • Llemin
    So tell me, why exactly should I pay $429 for "390"X if I can get custom cooled 290X for $350 or less already?
    Well, from what I have read, the 390 is faster than the 290x for cheaper than that, so you should just buy the 390.

    390 is not faster than 290X, price is the same pretty much. 390X and 290X are nothing more than 290 and 290X with a new sticker and another useless 4 GB of memory.

    Why they would not release 390 and 390X with 4GB VRAM and slash price by like 40 bucks is beyond me.

    Slight correction, the 390 trades blows with the 290x, this was on techspot so look it up if you want to.
    Reply
  • Gaidax
    So tell me, why exactly should I pay $429 for "390"X if I can get custom cooled 290X for $350 or less already?
    Well, from what I have read, the 390 is faster than the 290x for cheaper than that, so you should just buy the 390.

    390 is not faster than 290X, price is the same pretty much. 390X and 290X are nothing more than 290 and 290X with a new sticker and another useless 4 GB of memory.

    Why they would not release 390 and 390X with 4GB VRAM and slash price by like 40 bucks is beyond me.

    Slight correction, the 390 trades blows with the 290x, this was on techspot so look it up if you want to.
    So tell me, why exactly should I pay $429 for "390"X if I can get custom cooled 290X for $350 or less already?
    Well, from what I have read, the 390 is faster than the 290x for cheaper than that, so you should just buy the 390.

    390 is not faster than 290X, price is the same pretty much. 390X and 290X are nothing more than 290 and 290X with a new sticker and another useless 4 GB of memory.

    Why they would not release 390 and 390X with 4GB VRAM and slash price by like 40 bucks is beyond me.

    Slight correction, the 390 trades blows with the 290x, this was on techspot so look it up if you want to.
    So tell me, why exactly should I pay $429 for "390"X if I can get custom cooled 290X for $350 or less already?
    Well, from what I have read, the 390 is faster than the 290x for cheaper than that, so you should just buy the 390.

    390 is not faster than 290X, price is the same pretty much. 390X and 290X are nothing more than 290 and 290X with a new sticker and another useless 4 GB of memory.

    Why they would not release 390 and 390X with 4GB VRAM and slash price by like 40 bucks is beyond me.

    Slight correction, the 390 trades blows with the 290x, this was on techspot so look it up if you want to.

    It does not trade blows and not anything... 390X and 290X are virtually the same card and 390 and 290 are also virtually the same card.

    The only difference is that 390 and 390X come slightly overclocked out of the box, but if you compare third party 390X with third party 290X you will find that they are bloody same thing as you can see in Tom's review: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-radeon-r9-390x-r9-380-r7-370,4178-6.html

    The only real difference is 4k resolution, but really... both of those cards suck there anyway.
    Reply